Scribner's Magazine ..., Volume 34

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C. Scribner's sons, 1903
 

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Page 554 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans, fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations, who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment, we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 205 - Till he melted like a cloud in the silent summer heaven ; But Sir Richard bore in hand all his sick men from the land Very carefully and slow, Men of Bideford in Devon, And we laid them on the ballast down below: For we brought them all aboard, And they blest him in their pain, that they were not left to Spain, To the thumb-screw and the stake, for the glory of the Lord.
Page 536 - When a member shall be called to order, he shall sit down until the president shall have determined whether he is in order or not...
Page 205 - ... fiftythree. Ship after ship, the whole night long, their high-built galleons came, Ship after ship, the whole night long, with her battle-thunder and flame; Ship after ship, the whole night long, drew back with her dead and her shame.
Page 554 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans, through which the produce of threeeighths of our territory must pass to market...
Page 204 - AT Flores in the Azores Sir Richard Grenville lay, And a pinnace, like a flutter'd bird, came flying from far away; " Spanish ships of war at sea ! we have sighted fifty-three !" Then sware Lord Thomas Howard : " 'Fore God I am no coward ; But I cannot meet them here, for my ships are out of gear, And the half my men are sick. I must fly, but follow quick. We are six ships...
Page 204 - Four galleons drew away From the Spanish fleet that day, And two upon the larboard and two upon the starboard lay, And the battle-thunder broke from them all.
Page 536 - EVERY bill shall receive three readings previous to its being passed ; and the President shall give notice at each, whether it be the first, second, or third ; which readings shall be on three different days, unless the Senate unanimously direct otherwise...
Page 134 - Which leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in the dust, And forgetteth that the foot may crush them, or that the wild beast may break them.
Page 536 - President having taken the chair, and a quorum being present, the journal of the preceding day shall be read, to the end that any mistake may be corrected that shall have been made in the entries.

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