Practical Jurisprudence: A Comment on Austin

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The University Press, 1883 - Jurisprudence - 403 pages

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Page 143 - I authorize and give up my right of governing myself, to this man, or to this assembly of men, on this condition, that thou give up thy right to him, and authorize all his actions in like manner.
Page 143 - This is the generation of that great leviathan, or rather, to speak more reverently, of that mortal god, to which we owe under the immortal God, our peace and defence.
Page 107 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 401 - The Pointed Prayer Book, being the Book of Common Prayer with the Psalter or Psalms of David, pointed as they are to be sung or said in Churches. Embossed cloth, Royal 141110, is. The same in square 32mo. cloth, 6d. The Cambridge Psalter, for the use of Choirs and Organists. Specially adapted for Congregations in which the "Cambridge Pointed Prayer Book
Page 403 - An Analysis of the Exposition of the Creed, written by the Right Rev. Father in God, JOHN PEARSON, DD, late Lord Bishop of Chester. Compiled for the use of the Students of Bishop's College, Calcutta, by WH MILL, DD late Regius Professor of Hebrew in the University of Cambridge.
Page 402 - Greek and English Testament in parallel columns on the same page. Edited by J. SCHOLEFIELD, MA late Regius Professor of Greek in the University. New Edition, with the marginal references as arranged and rev'sed by DR SCRIVENER.
Page 143 - This is more than consent, or concord; it is a real unity of them all, in one and the same person, made by covenant of every man with every man...
Page 104 - Civil law is to every subject those rules which the commonwealth hath commanded him, by word, writing, or other sufficient sign of the will, to make use of, for the distinction of right and wrong; that is to say, of what is contrary and what is not contrary to the rule.
Page 266 - Inveterata consuetudo pro lege non immerito custoditur, et hoc est ius quod dicitur moribus constitutum. nam cum ipsae leges nulla alia ex causa nos teneant, quam quod iudicio populi receptae sunt, merito et ea, quae sine ullo scripto populus probavit, tenebunt omnes: nam quid interest suffragio populus voluntatem suam declaret an rebus ipsis et factis?

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