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Communications between the Collector of Customs at Liverpool

and Messrs. Klingender and Co. respecting shipment of Guns on board the “Gibraltar.”

No. 1.

Mr. Hammond to Mr. Hamilton.

Sir,

Foreign Office, February 24, 1864. IN the letter from Messrs. Klingender and Co. of Liverpool, to Captain T. A. Blakeley, in London, dated Liverpool, June 26, 1863, which was published at page 8 of the Papers headed “ Vessel Gibraltar,'” presented to the House of Commons in the month of July 1863, the following passage occurs :-" This action on the part of Her Majesty's Government is based upon the suspicion that ultimately your fort guns may find their way into the Southern Confederacy; the Collector” (i.e., the Collector of Her Majesty's Customs at Liverpool), “in reply to our question, having informed us that, if the fort guns were for the Federal or Northern Government, no obstacles would be placed in the way of their being shipped; stating, at the same time, that such shipments to New York were of common occurrence.”

As this passage has been twice quoted in the House of Commons, and has received no contradiction, Lord Russell requests that you will move the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury to have the goodness to ascertain from the Collector of Customs of Liverpool whether this statement correctly represents what he said to Messrs. Klingender and Co., and if not, what he really did say.

I am, &c. (Signed) E. HAMMOND.

No. 2.

Mr. Hamilton to Mr. Hammond.-(Received February 29.)

Sir,

ers

Treasury Chambers, February 29, 1864. WITH reference to your letter of 24th ultimo, I ain commanded by the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury to transmit to you herewith a copy of a Report dated 27th ultimo, from the Commissioners of Customs, and of a letter from Mr. Price Edwards, Collector of Customs at Liverpool, dated 26th ultimo, relating to a statement alleged to have been made by him in regard to the shipment of guns on board the ship “Gibraltar,” and I am to request that you will state to Earl Russell, with reference to Mr. Edwards's letter, that it appears to this Board to correct the wrong interpretation put upon Mr. Edwards' statement by Mr. Klingender.

I am to observe that at the time of the conversation a clearance had been refused to the “Gibraltar,” because it was supposed that guns were about to be placed in her, not as merchandize, but as part of her armament, and intended to be used by her in hostilities; the refusal of the clearance being, however, only maintained pending further explanation.

In this state of things Mr. Klingender inquired from Mr. Edwards whether there would be any objection to the shipment of such guns to New York.

The meaning attached to this question by Mr. Edwards appears to have been that it related to guns shipped as merchandize, and not as part of an armament of a vessel of war, and he accordingly replied that there would be no objectîon, adding, that such shipments to New York were of common occurrence.

not and could not be intended to form part of the armament of the “ Gibraltar," the clearance was immediately granted.

I am, &c.. (Signed) GEO. A. HAMILTON.

Inclosure 1 in No. 2.

Mr. Gardner to Mr. Hamilton.

Sir,

Cusiom-House, February 27, 1864. WITH reference to your letter of the 25th instant, I am desired to transmit to you herewith, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury, copy of a Report, with its inclosure, which the Board have received from their Collector at Liverpool with respect to a statement alleged to have been made by him concerning the shipment of guns in the “ Gibraltar,” and referred to in page 8 of the Parliamentary Return dated 20th July, 1863, No. 461.

I am, &c. (Signed) F. G. GARDNER.

Inclosure 2 in No. 2.

Mr. Edwards to the Commissioners of Customs. Honourable Sirs,

Custom-House, Liverpool, February 26, 1864. I HAVE this morning received your order of the 25th instant, inclosing the copy of a letter from the Foreign Office dated the 24th instant, respecting a statement alleged to have been made by me concerning the shipment of guns on the “Gibraltar,". and directing me to report whether the statement correctly represents what I said to Messrs. Klingender and Co., and if not, what I really did say.

I beg to report that, pursuant to your order of the 15th June last, I called upon Messrs. Klingender and Co. for an explanation as to the necessity of and reason for placing the guns and gun-carriages on board the ship in question, and placed a stop in the clearing of the ship until further orders. In consequence of this, Mr. Klingender and his solicitor called upon me, and, in the course of conversation, inquired whether there would be any objection to the shipment of such guns to New York; before replying to the question, I sent for the principal Office Searcher, whose Report I annex, and ascertained from him that shipment of all kinds of arms and guns to New York was continually going on, and I then answered there would be no objection to the exportation of such guns to New York.

I may add that shipments of this kind to New York have been continually going on since the commencement of the war between the Federal and Confederate States, and that on the 16th last February I transmitted to Sir Thomas Fremantle, for the information of the War Office, an account of the shipment of arms, &c., to America, showing the quantity, description, and value. No opinion was given by me as to the facility of shipping arms, either for the Federal or Confederate Government, as I had nothing to do with reference to the ultimate destination of the goods, but merely to reply to an inquiry whether they could be shipped to New York; nevertheless the inference was a very natural one, that if arms were forwarded to New York, they would be for the use of the Federal Government; and hence, possibly, Mr. Klingender, whom I have not scen since, and of whom I had no knowledge previously, may have formed his conclusions. I herewith return the copy of the letter from the Foreign Office.

(Signed) S. PRICE EDWARDS.

Inclosure 3 in No. 2.

Mr. Goold to Mr. Edwards.

Sir,

Searcher's Office, February 26, 1864. I BEG to state that I remember being asked by you, in the presence of Mr. Hall, Attorney, who had called to make inquiries respecting the shipment of two guns on board the vessel “Gibraltar,” whether arms were shipped to New York, to which I replied that they were.

An account of the number and value of rifles exported to ports in the United States of America during the year 1862, and openly cleared as arms, was forwarded to the Board on the 16th February, 1863.

I beg to add that arms and other munitions of war are still being shipped to the United States.

(Signed) H. GOOLD, Assistant Surveyor.

NORTH AMERICA.

No. 4. (1864.)

Communications between the Collector of Customs

at Liverpool and Messrs. Klingender and Co. respecting Shipment of Guns on board the “Gibraltar."

(In continuation of Papers respecting the vessel “Gibraltar," presented to Parliament in July 1863.)

Presented to both Houses of Parliament ly Com

mand of Her Majesty. 1864. ·

LONDON PRINTED BY HARRISON AND SONS.

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