The Poetical Works of William Cowper: With Life, and Critical Notice of His Writings. Eight Engravings on Steel

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Gall & Inglis, 1870 - English poetry - 516 pages
 

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Page 234 - OH ! for a closer walk with God ; A calm and heavenly frame ; A light to shine upon the road That leads me to the Lamb...
Page 242 - E'er since, by faith, I saw the stream Thy flowing wounds supply, Redeeming love has been my theme, And shall be till I die.
Page 390 - Kempenfelt is gone , His last sea-fight is fought, His work of glory done. It was not in the battle ; No tempest gave the shock ; She sprang no fatal leak ; She ran upon no rock His sword was in its sheath, His fingers held the pen, When Kempenfelt went down With twice four hundred men.
Page 165 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And, while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups That cheer, but not inebriate, wait on. each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 133 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; * if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free, They touch our country, and their shackles, fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then, And let it circulate through every vein Of all your empire ; that where Britain's power Is felt, mankind may feel her mercy too.
Page 298 - For saddle-tree scarce reached had he, His journey to begin, When, turning round his head, he saw Three customers come in. So down he came; for loss of time, Although it grieved him sore, Yet loss of pence, full well he knew, Would trouble him much more. 'Twas long before the customers Were suited to their mind, When Betty screaming came down stairs, "The wine is left behind!" "Good lack!" quoth he — "yet bring it me My leathern belt likewise, In which I bear my trusty sword When I do exercise.
Page 234 - Return, O holy Dove, return, Sweet messenger of rest ! I hate the sins that made thee mourn, And drove thee from my breast. 5 The dearest idol I have known, Whate'er that idol be, Help me to tear it from thy throne, And worship only thee.
Page 211 - One song employs all nations ; and all cry, " Worthy the Lamb, for he was slain for us !" The dwellers in the vales and on the rocks Shout to each other, and the mountain tops From distant mountains catch the flying joy ; Till, nation after nation taught the strain, Earth rolls the rapturous, hosanna round.
Page 298 - My sister and my sister's child, myself and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride on horseback after we." He soon replied, "I do admire of womankind but one, And you are she, my dearest dear, therefore it shall be done. I am a linen-draper bold, as all the world doth know, And my good friend the calendrer will lend his horse to go.
Page 120 - Witness a joy that thou hast doubled long. Thou know'st my praise of nature most sincere, And that my raptures are not conjured up To serve occasions of poetic pomp, But genuine, and art partner of them all.

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