The American Constitutional System: An Introduction to the Study of the American State

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Page 274 - The records and judicial proceedings of the courts of any State or Territory, or of any such country, shall be proved or admitted in any other court within the United States, by the attestation of the clerk, and the seal of the court annexed, if there be a seal, together with a certificate of the judge, chief justice, or presiding magistrate, that the said attestation is in due form.
Page 79 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 48 - ... ordained and established' in the name of the people; and is declared to be ordained 'in order to form a more perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, and secure the blessings of liberty to themselves and to their posterity.' The assent of the States in their sovereign capacity is implied in calling a convention, and thus submitting that instrument to the people. But the people were at perfect liberty to accept or reject it, and their act was final. It required not the affirmance,...
Page 80 - ... and I hereby command the persons composing the combinations aforesaid to disperse, and retire peaceably to their respective abodes within twenty days from this date.
Page 314 - Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer, Daniel Carroll. VIRGINIA — John Blair, James Madison, Jr. NORTH CAROLINA — William Blount, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Hugh Williamson. SOUTH CAROLINA — John Rutledge, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Charles Pinckney, Pierce Butler. GEORGIA — William Few, Abraham Baldwin. Attest: William Jackson, Secretary.
Page 260 - Spanish subjects, natives of the Peninsula, residing in the territory over which Spain by the present treaty relinquishes or cedes her sovereignty, may remain in such territory or may remove therefrom, retaining in either event all their rights of property, including the right to sell or dispose of such property or of its proceeds; and they shall also have the right to carry on their industry, commerce, and profession, being subject in respect thereof to such laws as are applicable to other foreigners.
Page 132 - that the laws of the several States, except where the Constitution, treaties, or statutes of the United States shall otherwise require or provide, shall be regarded as rules of decision in trials at common law in the courts of the United States, in cases where they apply.
Page 248 - States, whose fathers were or may be at the time of their birth citizens thereof, are declared to be citizens of the United States; but the rights of citizenship shall not descend to children whose fathers never resided in the United States.
Page 283 - Having no absolute right of recognition in other States but depending for such recognition and the enforcement of its contracts upon their assent, it follows, as a matter of course, that such assent may be granted upon such terms and conditions as those States may think proper to impose. They may exclude the foreign corporation entirely ; they may restrict its business to particular localities, or they may exact such security for the performance of its contracts with their citizens as in their judgment...
Page 119 - Under this article of the constitution it rests with congress to decide what government is the established one in a State. For as the United States guarantee to each State a republican government, congress -must necessarily decide what government is established in the State before it can determine whether it is republican or not.

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