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Wheat

Criblings

Pease ...
Oats ...
Barley ...

Indian corn

Hayseed

Flour

Biscuit

Pork

Ditto - -

Beef

Oak timber

Pi ne ditto

Maple walnut

Staves and heading - 1

Ditto ends

Boards and planks

Oak planks

Handspikes

Oars

Masts

Bowsprits

Yards

Spars ■ - '

Hoops

Lath wood

Scantling

Punch- and Mid. packs

Madeira do. «

Cod fish

Salmon

Ditto - -

Mertings

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6 60 0

1612 15 0

215500 120 0

130215 pieces 250 0

2426 $ 0

1469 15 O

2026 15 0

2949 quintals .... 14 0

♦794 tierces 80 0

61 barrels 50 0

519 ditto 12 C

381,974

0

10

17

18

0

8

0

5

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

15

4

6

0

0

.0

0

0

0

10

10

10

6

0

10

7

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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Add expence of the military department, which lias? been more this year than usual. $

[table]

334 vessels cleared at the Custom-house.
70275 tons.
3330 men.

To illustrate more fully the above tonnage in 1808, as increased by the natural amelioration of the country, and by the embargo in America, let us compare it with the tonnage of the shipping of the years 1806—33,996. 1807—42,293. The increase is conspicuous.

No. XL

To the Right Hon. Lord Hobart, one of His

Majejly's principal Secretaries of State,

8$c. #c.

The Memorial and Petition of the Merchants and other Inhabitants of New Brunswick,

Humbly sheweth,

THAT after the settlement of this province by the American loyalists in the year 1783, its inhabitants eagerly engaged in endeavouring to supply with fish and lumber the British possessions in the West Indies, and by their exertions they had, within the first ten years, built ninety-three square-rigged vessels, and seventy-one sloops and schooners, which were principally employed in that trade. There was the most flattering prospect that this trade would have rapidly increased, when the late war breaking out, the Governors of the West India islands admitted, by proclamation, the vessels of the United Slates of America to supply them with every thing they wanted; by which means the rising trade of this province has been materially injured, and the enterprising spirit of its inhabitants severely checked. For the citizens of the United States, having none of the evils of war to encounter, are not subject to the high rates of insurance on their vessels and cargoes, nor to the great advance in the wages of seamen, to which, by the imperious circumstances of the times, British subjects are unavoidably liable. And being admitted by proclamation, they are thereby exempt from a transient and parochial duty of two and a half to five per cent- exacted in the West India islands from British subjects.

Admission into the British ports in the West Indies having been once obtained by the Americans, their government has spared neither pains nor expence to increase ihelrjisheries, so essential to that trade. By granting a bounty of nearly 20*. per ton on all vessels employed in the cod fishery, they have induced numbers to turn their attention to that business, and now the principal part of the cod fishery in the Biy of Fundy is engrossed by them.

c c

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