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PORTRAIT OF GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN................................................................ Ficrúspiece.

MOBILE BAY-FLEET PASSING THE FORTS AND OBSTRUCTIONS................................... Wagnette Title.

P012TRAIT OF GENERAL BUELL ................................................................................. To Face 6

BATTLE OF MILL SPRINGS, KY—DEATH OF GENERAL ZOLLICOFFER................................. -- 20

PORTRAIT OF CAPTAIN F00TE.................................................................................. -- 26

CAPTURE OF FORT DONELSON..................... ......................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “ 34

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL BURNSIDE..................................................................... . . . . . . . . #4 59

CAPTURE OF ROANOKE ISLAND.—CHARGE OF ZOUAVES............................... .................. -- 65

NAVAL ENGAGEMENT IN HAMPTON ROADS.–THE MERRIMAC AND THE MONITOR.................. -- 95

B0MBARDMENT OF ISLAND No. 10............................................................................... “ 135

BATTLE OF SHILOH, TENN.—CHARGE OF GENERAL GRANT............................................... * 150

PORTRAIT OF ADMIRAL FARRA GUT'............................................................................ “ 174

CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEAN.S.–FLEET PASSING FORTS ON THE MISSISSIPPI......... ................ “ 181

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL KEARNEY............................................................................. “ 224

MAP OF RICHMOND AND ITS DEFENCES.................. .................................................... “ 237

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL T. J. JACKSON....................................................................... “ 264

NEW ORLEANS, LA., AND ITS WICINITY....................................................................... “ 287

BATTLE OF MALVERN HILL, VA.—UNITED STATES GUN-BOATS ON THE JAMES RIVER COVER-

ING THE RETREAT........................................ ................................................. “ 320

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE. ................................ ................................... “ 339

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL POPE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. . . . . . . . . . . . ......................... “ 348

MAP OF THE SOUTHWESTERN PART OF THE UNITED STATES.......................................... “ 359

GENERAL KEARNEY's CHARGE AT THE BATTLE of CHANTILLY, WA.......................". . . . . . . . . “ 413

MAP OF VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, DELAWARE, AND PART OF PENNSYLVANIA........................ “ 420

MAP OF ANTIETAM, SHARPSBURG, AND WICINITY.......................................................... “ 426

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL ROSECRANS............................. ............................................. “ 495

MAP OF SOUTHERN STATES BORDERING ON THE GULF OF MEXICO................................... “ 558

MAP OF WICKSBURG AND ITS DEFENCES...... ................... ........................................... “ 567

[graphic]

THE WAR WITH THE SOUTII:

A HISTORY OF THE

GREAT AMERICAN REBELLION,

CHA PTE R I.

Position of Kentucky.—A great Battle-field.—Expectations of both Antagonists.-The Secessionists balked by a

1861

Loyal Legislature.—The Secessionists form an independent Government.—Meeting of Secessionists at Russellville.— Declaration of Grievances.—A Convention called.—Meeting of Convention.—Declaration of Independence and Ordinance of Secession.—Provisional Government.—Commissioners to Southern Confederacy.—Kentucky admitted as a Confederate State.-The only solution through Civil War.—The United States prepared.—Position of its Forces.—Don Carlos Buell.—Life of Buell.—Military Education and Services.-Gallantry and Promotion.—A Brigadier-General.—Noticed by McClellan.—In command of the Department of the Cumberland.—Buell busy in organizing.—The Position of the Enemy. —Invasion of Kentucky.—Zollicoffer at Cumberland Gap.–General Buckner at Bowling Green.—General Johnston —Life of A. Sydney Johnston.—Military Education and Services.—Resigns his Commission.—A Private in the Texan War.— Secretary of War in Texas.-In the Mexican War.—Retirement.— Paymaster in the United States Army.—Appointed Colonel of Cavalry by Pierce on the recommendation of Jefferson Davis.-Chief of the Expedition to Utah. —Johnston exciting to Rebellion in California — Escape.—In command under the Confederacy.—Character of Johnston.—The Struggle begun in Kentucky.—Zollicoffer's attack on Camp Wild Cat.—His Defeat.—The hopes of the Unionists of East Tennessee.—Flight of Zollicoffer.—Difficulties of pursuit.—Disappointment.—General Position in Kentucky of opposing Forces.—Engagement at Ivy Mountain.—The Enemy driven from Eastern Kentucky.—Position of Buell and Johnston.—Advance of Forces by Buell. —Retirement of the Enemy.—The Engagement at Green River.—The Results.-Feeble attempt of Humphrey Marshall.—Success of Colonel Garfield.—A forced Retreat acknowledged, but a success claimed by the Enemy. Comparative Losses.

course between the northern lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. Both antagonists, conscious of the importance of holding the supremacy in a State thus situated,

KENTUCKY was destined to become the chief battle-field from its position as a border State—bounded on the

north by the loyal States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, and on the east, south, and west by Virginia, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri, more or less within the power of the enemy—from the conflict of opinion among its own citizens and its relation geographically to the

Mississippi, the great channel of inter

made great efforts to secure it.
The secessionists, balked in their at-
tempts at disunion by the firm loyalty
of the Legislature, resolved upon the ex-
pedient of substituting for the legal au-
thorities of the State an independent

government. The insurrectionary lead

ers accordingly met at Russellville, a 0ct, small town in the southern part of 29, Kentucky, and after drawing up a declaration of grievances, and denouncing the loyal action of the Legislature, called a convention, “to be chosen, elected, or appointed in any manner by the people of the several counties of the State,” to meet at the same place. This hybrid convention, composed of some 200 persons, accordingly met at Now, Russellville at the time appointed. 18. They immediately proceeded to pass a “Declaration of Independence and an Ordinance of Secession,” to establish a provisional government consisting of a governor with a legislative council of ten, and to appoint three commissioners to the Southern Confederacy.” The Congress of the Confederate States eagerly welcomed the arrival of the representatives of Kentucky secession, and without delay passed an act by which that State was admitted a member “on an equal footing with the other States of the Confederacy.” The great question, however, was not to be settled in Kentucky by conventions and political manifestoes. The only solution was through war, and both parties now prepared to wage it with the utmost vigor. The Federal Government had not only,

° The following were the officers of this new State government:

Gover Nor. —George W. Johnson.

LEGISLATIVE Council.—William B. Machen, John W. Crockett, James P. Bates, James S. Critman, Philander R. Thompson, I. P. Burnside, H. W. Bruce, I. W. Moore, E. M. Bruce, and George B. Hodge.

by the possession of Cairo, in Illinois, Bird's Point, in Missouri, and Paducah, secured important bases of operations upon the Mississippi and Ohio from which to command these rivers and the western part of Kentucky, but had concentrated a large army at Louisville, to operate within the interior of the State. The command was given to General Don Carlos Buell, who succeeded, as will be recollected, General Sherman, the successor of General Anderson, of Fort Sumter fame. Don Carlos Buell was born in Ohio in 1819. He was admitted into the West Point Military Academy as a cadet in 1837, and in graduating in 1841 was appointed a second lieutenant of the Third Infantry. In June, 1846, he was promoted to a first lieutenancy, and on the 23d of September, 1846, was brevetted a captain for his services at Monterey. During 1847 and 1848 he acted as adjutant of his regiment, and bore a distinguished part in the battle of Cerro Gordo. His gallant conduct subsequently at Contreras and Churubusco won for him the brevet rank of major. In 1848 he was appointed assistant adjutantgeneral. In 1851 he relinquished his rank in line, but continued to act as assistant adjutant-general until the commencement of the war, when he was at once promoted to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Congress soon after created him a brigadier-general of volunteers. His first service in the present conflict was as the commander of a division under General McClellan, who was so impressed by his soldierly qualities that he induced the

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