Page images
PDF
EPUB

lowing passage will show that the editor has not made his Venus entirely out of the froth of the sea, or manufactured his ivory without a little fragment of the elephant's tooth.

« We saw Hawkestone, the seat of Sir Rowland Hill, and were conducted by Miss Hill over a large tract of rocks and woods; a region abounding with striking scenes and terrific grandeur. We were always on the brink of a precipice, or at the foot of a lofty rock; but the steeps were seldom naked: in many places, oaks of uncommon magnitude shot up from the crannies of stone; and where there were no trees, there were underwoods and bushes.

“ Round the rocks is a narrow path cut upon the stone, which is very frequently hewn into steps; but art has proceeded no further than to make the succession of wonders safely accessible. The whole circuit is somewhat laborious ; it is terminated by a grotto. cut in the rock to a great extent, with many windings, and supported by pillars, not hewn into regularity, but such as imitate the spots of nature, by asperities and protuberances. i " The place is without any dampness, and would afford an habitation not uncomfortable. There were from space to space seats cut out in the rock. Though it wants water, it excels Dovedale by the extent of its prospects, the awfulness of its shades, the horrors of its precipices, the verdure of its hollows, and the loftiness of its rocks: the ideas which it forces upon the mind are, the sublime, the dreadful, and the vast. "Above is inaccessible altitude, below is horrible profundity. But excels the garden of Ilam only in extent.

“ Ilam has grandeur tempered with softness; the walker congratulates his own arrival at the place, and is grieved to think he must ever leave it. As he looks up to the rocks, his thoughts are elevated; as he turns his eyes on the valleys, he is composed and soothed.

“ He that mounts the precipices at Hawkestone, wonders how he came thither, and doubts how he shall return. His walk is an aď. venture, and his departure an escape. He has not the tranquillity, but the horrors, of solitude; a kind of turbulent pleasure, between fright and admiration.

Îlam is the fit abode of pastoral virtue, and might properly diffuse its shades over nymphs and swains. Hawkestone can have no fitter inhabitants than giants of mighty bone and bold emprise; men of lawJess courage and heroic violence. Hawkestone should be described by Milton, and Ilam by Parnel.” (P. 38-43.)

Mr. Duppa will pardon us if we dismiss him with an assurance that this is the only occasion on which we shall

his time and talents to such an employment as that which has given birth to this publication.

spare

[ocr errors]

Art. XI.-Statements respecting the East India College, with an

Appeal to Facts, in Refrstation of the Charges lately brought against it, in the Court of Proprietors. By the Rev. T. R. Malthus, Professor of History and Political Economy in the East India College, Hertfordshire. 8vo. pp. 105. Murray. Lon

don, 1817. The attention of the public has recently been directed, in a very pointed manner, to the subject which is here discussed by Mr. Malthus. We have perused, not without surprise, the statements 'made in the East India Court of Proprietors, and the comments which have been inserted in some of the daily papers. It is a good and approved rule to hear both sides of a question, and we readily embrace the opportunity afforded us by the pamphlet announced at the head of this article, to bring the case distinctly before our readers. To those who are disposed to form their judgment of the East India College from the warm and unqualified assertions which have lately been advanced, the question would seem to admit of a very simple and easy solution. If it be true that, after every experiment which the nature of a collegiate establishment will admit, the East India Seminary, contrary to all analogy and to uniform experience in every other institution for the education of youth, be remarkable only for profligacy and disorder, for neglect in the governors and insolence in the governed ; if it be justly represented as the pest of the neighbourhood, and the disgrace of the country, where is the individual who would plead for its continuance? And if it be further true that the young men who proceed to India have no need of other instruction than such as may qualify them 'to weigh tea, count bales, and measure muslins;” what need is there, we would ask, of a liberal education at all? The elements of common arithmetic, and a smattering of the oriental languages, must in all reason be a sufficient qualification for the duties of the East; and the happiness of 60,000,000 of our fellow subjects may safely be trusted to the discretion of those, whom the aristocratical maxims of European policy would consign to the traffic cf the counter or the business of the warehouse. In the and statements which have been adopted by the

vien persons to whom we now allude, Mr. Malthus declares that he can by no means concur; he believes their notions of policy to be erroneous, and to the best of his knowledge maintains their accusations to be unfounded. It has not been our good fortune always to coincide in opinion with the Author of the Essay on Population; but we readily acknowledge that he comes forward with the authority of a name, than which few are more respected, and that his situation at the College gives him a strong title to be heard. It has indeed been affirmed that the pamphlet before us is full of misrepresentations, but we have hitherto seen no attempt to prove the truth of the charge. Of the seven sections into which the work is divided, the first five bear generally upon the question; and, with regard to these, every intelligent person in the kingdom is as well qualified to judge as any member of the Honourable Company. They appeal plainly to the good sense of the reader, and unless the quotations be false, we really cannot see on what principle the charge of misrepresentation can be made out in reference to these sections, even with the shadow of probability. The two last sections relate more immediately to the state of the College: for the truth of these statements the character of Mr. Malthus stands pledged, so far as he has the means of information; the facts which he mentions are few, and every director of the court must of his own knowlege be competent to decide upon their correctness or inaccuracy;—if true, they are perfectly conclusive.

“ The whole subject," Mr. Malthus observes, “ may, perhaps, be advantageously resolved into the following questions; and the answers to them

are intended to furnish some materials for the determination of the important points to which they refer.

“1. What are the qualifications at present necessary for the civil service of the East India Company, in the administration of their Indian territories ?

“ 2. Has any deficiency in those qualifications been actually experienced in such a degree as to be injurious to the service in India?

" 3. In order to secure the qualifications required for the service of the Company, is an appropriate establishment necessary ?-and should it be of the nature of a school, or a college?

66 4. Should such an establishment be in England or in India? or should there be an establishment in both countries ?

5. Does it appear that the college actually established in Hert, fordshire is upon a plan calculated to supply that part of the appropriate education of the civil servants of the Company which ought to be completed in Europe?

6. Are the disturbances which have taken place in the East India College to be attributed to any radical and necessary evils inherent in its constitution and discipline; or to adventitious and temporary causes, which are likely to be removed ?

“ 7. Are the more general charges which have lately been brought against the college in the Court of Proprietors founded in truth or are they capable of a distinct refutation, by an appeal to facts ?" (P. 2, 3.)

answer to the first inquiry concerning the qualifica, tions necessary for the civil servants of the Company, we are referred to the " Minute of Council ” of the Marquis Wellesley,

1

In

dated Aug. 18, 1800. It would be difficult to point out any individual better qualified to speak on this subject; and there is none to whose judgment the British public will, on such a question, more readily defer. The whole passage, as cited by Mr. Malthus, bears so directly upon the argument, that we cannot deny ourselves the satisfaction of adducing the opinions of that eminent statesman in his own language.

'« « The British possessions in India now constitute one of the most extensive and populous empires in the world. The immediate admi. nistration of the government of the various provinces and nations composing this empire is principally confided to European civil servants of the East-India Company. Those provinces, namely, Bengal, Behar, Orissa, and Benares ; the Company's Jaghire in the Carnatic, the Northern Circars, the Baramhal, and other districts ceded by the peace of Seringapatam in 1792, which are under the more immediate and direct administration of the civil servants of the Company, are acknow. ledged to form the most. opulent and flourishing part of India ; in which property, life, civil order, and religious liberty, are more secure, and the people enjoy a larger portion of the benefits of good governments than in any other country in this quarter of the globe. The duty and policy of the British government in India require that the system of confiding the immediate exercise of every branch and department of the civil government to Europeans educated in its own service, and subject to its own direct controul, should be diffused as widely as possible, as well with a view to the stability of our own interests, as to the happiness and welfare of our native subjects. This principle formed the basis of the wise and benevolent system introduced by Lord Cornwallis, for the improvement of the internal government of the provinces immediately subject to the presidency of Bengal.

Hilfe In proportion to the extension of this beneficial system, the duties of the European civil servants of the East India Company are become of greater magnitude and importance. The denominations of writer, factor and merchant, by which the several classes of the civil service are still distinguished, are now utterly inapplicable to the nature and extent of the duties discharged and of the occupations pursued by the civil servants of the Company.

" To dispense justice to millions of people of various languages, man. ners, usages, and religions; to administer a vast and complicated system of revenue, through districts equal in extent to some of the most considerable kingdoms in Europe ; to maintain civil order in one of the most populous and litigious regions in the world; these are now the duties of the larger portion of the civil servants of the Company, The senior merchants, composing the Courts of Circuit and Appeal ûnder the presidency of Bengal, exercise in each of these courts jurisdiction of greater local extent, applicable to a larger population, and occupied in the determination of causes infinitely more intricate and numerous, than that of any regularly constituted courts of justice

any part of Europe. The senior or junior merchants employed in the several magistracies and Zillah courts, the writers or factors filling

[ocr errors]

and that his situation at the College gives him a strong title to be heard. It has indeed been affirmed that the pamphlet before us is full of misrepresentations, but we have hitherto seen no attempt to prove the truth of the charge. Of the seven sections into which the work is divided, the first five bear generally upon the question ; and, with regard to these, every intelligent person in the kingdom is as well qualified to judge as any member of the Honourable Company. They appeal plainly to the good sense of the reader, and unless the quotations be false, we really cannot see on what principle the charge of misrepresentation can be made out in reference to these sections, even with the shadow of probability. The two last sections relate more immediately to the state of the College: for the truth of these statements the character of Mr. Malthus stands pledged, so far as he has the means of information; the facts which he mentions are few, and every director of the court must of his own knowlege be competent to decide upon their correctness or inaccúrácy;--if true, they are perfectly conclusive.

“ The whole subject,” Mr. Malthus observes, 6 may, perhaps, be advantageously resolved into the following questions; and the answers to them are intended to furnish some materials for the determination of the important points to which they refer.

“1. What are the qualifications at present necessary for the civil service of the East India Company, in the administration of their Indian territories ?

2. Has any deficiency in those qualifications been actually experienced in such a degree as to be injurious to the service in India?

" 3. In order to secure the qualifications required for the service of the Company, is an appropriate establishment necessary ? --and should it be of the nature of a school, or a college?

6 4. Should such an establishment be in England op in India? or should there be an establishment in both countries ?

5. Does it appear that the college actually established in Hert, fordshire is upon a plan calculated to supply that part of the appropriate education of the civil servants of the Company which ought to be completed in Europe ?

" 6. Are the disturbances which have taken place in the East India College to be attributed to any radical and necessary evils inherent in its constitution and discipline; or to adventitious and temporary causes, which are likely to be removed?

7. Are the more general charges which have lately been brought against the college in the Court of Proprietors founded in truth or are they capable of a distinct refutation, by an appeal to facts 3" (P. 2, 3.)

In answer to the first inquiry concerning the qualifica, tions necessary for the civil servants of the Company, we are referred to the 4 Minute of Council.” of the Marquis Wellesley,

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »