The history of England from the Revolution to the death of George the second. Designed as a continuation of mr. Hume's history, Volume 1

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Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1848 - Great Britain - 2 pages

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Page 333 - That no person who has an office or place of profit under the King, or receives a pension from the crown, shall be capable of serving as a member of the house of commons.
Page 464 - An Act for the effectual securing the Kingdom of England from the apparent dangers that may arise from several Acts lately passed in the Parliament of Scotland.
Page 334 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, judges commissions be made quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established; but upon the address of both houses of parliament it may be lawful to remove them. That no pardon under the great seal of England be pleadable to an impeachment by the commons in parliament.
Page 333 - That in case the Crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person, not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the Crown of England, without...
Page 196 - And they went to bury her : but they found no more of her than the skull, and the feet, and the palms of her hands.
Page 376 - An act for the further security of his Majesty's person and the succession of the crown in the Protestant line, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and all other pretenders, and their open and secret abettors...
Page 487 - An Act for the security of Her " Majesty's Person and Government, and of the " succession to the Crown of Great Britain in the
Page 118 - ... that upon the trial of any peer or peeress either for treason or misprision all the peers who have a right to sit and vote in Parliament shall be duly summoned twenty days at least before every such trial to appear at every such trial, and that every peer so summoned and appearing at such trial shall vote in the trial...
Page 333 - That in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the crown of England without the consent of Parliament.
Page 493 - An act for the further limitation of the crown, and the better securing the rights and liberties of the subject. The Scottish commissioners, in order to comply in some measure with the popular clamour of their nation, presented a proposal, implying, that the succession to the crown of Scotland should be established upon the same persons mentioned in the act of king William's reign : that the subjects of Scotland should for ever enjoy all the rights and privileges of the natives in...

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