An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans

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Allen and Ticknor, 1833 - African Americans - 232 pages
 

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An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans

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Published in 1833 and 1808, respectively, these volumes were among the earliest examples of abolitionist literature. Child presents a full-scale analysis of slavery in historical, political, economic ... Read full review

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Page 37 - And if a man smite the eye of his servant, or the eye of his maid, that it perish ; he shall let him go free for his eye's sake. 27 And if he smite out his manservant's tooth, or his maidservant's tooth; he shall let him go free for his tooth's sake.
Page 177 - The air was sweet and plaintive, and the words, literally translated, were these. "The winds roared, and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him milk; no wife to grind his corn.
Page 206 - And he arose and went: and, behold, a man of Ethiopia, an eunuch of great authority under Candace queen of the Ethiopians, who had the charge of all her treasure, and had come to Jerusalem for to worship, was returning, and sitting in his chariot read Esaias the prophet.
Page 16 - The parent storms, the child looks on, catches the lineaments of wrath, puts on the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to the worst of passions, and thus nursed, educated, and daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped by it with odious peculiarities.
Page 32 - JjETTER is a dry morsel, and quietness therewith, than an house full of sacrifices with strife. 2, A wise servant shall have rule over a son that causeth shame, and shall have part of the inheritance among the brethren.
Page 32 - Now I say, That the heir, as long as he is a child, differeth nothing from a servant, though he be lord of all ; but is under tutors and governors until the time appointed of the father.
Page 96 - Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to servitude for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons.
Page 25 - I know nothing that could, in this view, be said better, than " do unto others as ye would that others should do unto you...
Page 164 - Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou hast great allies; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.

About the author (1833)

Lydia Maria Child was born in Medford, Massachusetts on February 11, 1802. She was educated at home, at a local dame school, and at a nearby women's seminary. Her first novel, Hobomok, was published in 1824. Her other novels include The Rebels or Boston before the Revolution, The First Settlers, Philothea, and Romance of the Republic. She wrote advice books including The Frugal Housewife, The Mother's Book, The Little Girl's Own Book, and The Freedmen's Book. She was an abolitionist, women's rights activist, and Indian rights advocate. She wrote books about these causes including An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans, Anti-Slavery Catechism, and An Appeal for the Indians. She was also the author of Over the River and Through the Wood (A Boy's Thanksgiving Day). She died on October 20, 1880.