Memoirs of the Life and Times of the Rt. Hon. Henry Grattan, Volume 5

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Page 478 - Ireland have severally agreed and resolved, that, in order to promote and secure the essential interests of Great Britain and Ireland, and to consolidate the strength, power, and resources of the British Empire, it will be advisable to concur in such measures as may best tend to unite the two kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland...
Page 95 - I know the difficulty the honorable gentleman labored under when he attacked me, conscious that on a comparative view of our characters, public and private, there is nothing he could say which would injure me. The public would not believe the charge. I despise the falsehood. If such a charge were made by an honest man, I would answer it in the manner I shall do before I sit down. But I shall first reply to it when not made by an honest man. The right honorable gentleman has called me "an unimpeached...
Page 154 - We spent them not in toys, or lust, or wine; But search of deep philosophy, Wit, eloquence, and poesy; Arts which I loved, for they, my friend, were thine...
Page 168 - Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath. Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty: Thou art not conquer'd; beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks. And death's pale flag is not advanced there.
Page 97 - I was the parent and the founder, from the assassination of such men as the honorable gentleman and his unworthy associates. They are corrupt, — they are seditious, — and they, at this very moment, are in a conspiracy against their country ! I have returned to refute a libel...
Page 95 - traitor," unqualified by any epithet ? I will tell him ; it was because he dare not! It was the act of a coward, who raises his arm to strike, but has not courage to give the blow ! I will not call him villain, because it would be unparliamentary, and he is a privy councillor.
Page 97 - I have returned, not as the right honorable member has said, to raise another storm; I have returned to discharge an honorable debt of gratitude to my country, that conferred a great reward for past services, which, I am proud to say, was not greater than my desert. I have returned to protect that Constitution, of which I was the parent...
Page 512 - I cannot conclude without expressing the gratification I should feel, if some of those persons with whom the early habits of my public life were formed, would strengthen my hands, and constitute a part of my government.
Page 154 - ... course. I would add, that if he had seemed to hesitate, it was but for a moment ; that his hesitation was like the passing cloud that floats across the morning sun, and hides it from the view, and does so for a moment hide it, by involving the spectator, without even approaching the face of the luminary. And this soothing hope I draw from the dearest and tenderest recollections of my life ; from the remembrance of those attic nights and those refections of the gods which we have partaken with...
Page 425 - That this house will, early in the next session of parliament, take into its most serious consideration the state of the laws affecting his Majesty's Roman Catholic subjects in Great Britain and Ireland ; with a view to such a final -and conciliatory adjustment, "as may be conducive to the peace and strength of the united kingdom ; to the stability of the protestant establishment ; and to the general satisfaction and concord of all classes of his Majesty's subjects.

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