Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Instruction

Front Cover
List of members included in each volume, beginning with 1891.

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Page 105 - If all the heavenly quintessence they still From their immortal flowers of poesy, Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive The highest reaches of a human wit; If these had made one poem's period, And all combined in beauty's worthiness, Yet should there hover in their restless heads One thought, one grace, one wonder, at the least, Which into words no virtue can digest.
Page 75 - That our sons may be as plants Grown up in their youth ; That our daughters may be as corner-stones, Polished after the similitude of a palace...
Page 14 - In truth, the ministry now accomplishes little for want of that early intellectual and moral discipline, by which alone a community can be prepared to distinguish truth from falsehood, to comprehend the instructions of the pulpit, to receive higher and broader views of duty, and to apply general principles to the diversified details of life.
Page 9 - The true end of education, as we have again and again suggested, is to unfold and direct aright our whole nature. Its office is to call forth power of every kind, power of thought, affection, will, and outward action ; power to observe, to reason, to judge, to contrive ; power to adopt good ends firmly, and to pursue them efficiently ; power to govern ourselves, and to influence others ; power to gain and to spread happiness.
Page 138 - ... gives no prophetic pledge, to the eye, of the beauty that will bloom from it. A dull, sober, quakerish clay shoots up " the splendid hues of the hypoxis," and the lupine spreads its soft azure petals over the sharp yellow sand. The fringed gentian, " Blue, blue as if the sky let fall A flower from its cerulean wall," smiles over the blackest mud.
Page 118 - A noble and attractive every-day bearing comes of goodness, of sincerity, of refinement. And these are bred in years, not moments. The principle that rules your life is the sure posture-master. Sir Philip Sidney was the pattern to all England of a perfect gentleman; but then he was the hero that, on the field of Zutphen, pushed away the cup of cold water from his own fevered and parching lips, and held it out to the dying soldier at his side ! Such civility implies self-sacrifice, and it has reached...
Page 25 - In the elder days of Art, Builders -wrought with greatest care Each minute and unseen part ; For the gods see everywhere. Let us do our work as well, Both the unseen and the seen; Make the house, where gods may dwell, Beautiful, entire, and clean.
Page 105 - Had fed the feeling of their masters' thoughts, And every sweetness that inspir'd their hearts, Their minds, and muses on admired themes; If all the heavenly quintessence they still From their immortal flowers of poesy, Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive The highest reaches of a human wit; If these had made one poem's period, And all combin'd in beauty's worthiness, Yet should there hover in their restless heads One thought, one grace, one wonder, at the least, Which into words no virtue can digest.
Page 122 - s the wealth of wealth, the toiler's hope, The poor man's piecer-out, the art of nature, Painting her landscapes twice; the spirit of fact As matter is the body ; the pure gift Of Heaven to poet and to child ; which he Who retains most in manhood, being a man In all things fitting else, is most a man, Because he wants no human facutty, Nor loses one sweet taste of the sweet -world.
Page 126 - The tempest did not create the vigor which it tried and proved, and left erect as ever. Test these general positions, in their practical bearing, on your employments, as before, by a familiar example. It is in the experience of most teachers, I presume, that on certain days, from first to last, as if through some subtile and untraceable malignity in the air, the school-room seems to have fallen under the control of a secret fiend of disorder. There is nothing apparent to account for this epidemic...

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