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Non tamen pigebit vel incondita ac rudi voce memoriam prioris fervitutis, ac

teftimonium præsentium bonorum compofuiffe. Tacit. Agricola.

LONDON:
Printed for JAMES RIVINGTON and James Fletcher, at the
Oxford-Theatre; and R.BALDWIN, at the Rose, in Paternosier-row.

MDCCLIX.

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T

un- An account

liaments.

mehr den min non maut

HE old Whig principle was not yet wholly A.C. 1693. expelled from the lower house. The u

due influence of the court was exerted in of the placesuch an open scandalous manner, as gave offence to that for trithe majority of the commons. In the midst of all eanial para their condescension, Sir Edward Hussey, member for Lincoln, brought in a bill touching free and impartial proceedings in parliament. It was intended to disable all members of parliament from enjoying places of trust and profit, and particularly leveiled against the officers of the army and navy, who had insinuated themselves into the house in such numbers, that this was commonly called the officers parliament. The bill passed the house of commons, and was sent up to the lords, by whom

it

B 2

A. C. 1692. it was read a second time, and committed; but the

ministry employing their whole strength against it, on the report it was thrown out by a majority of two voices. The earl of Mulgrave again distinguished himself by his elocution, in a speech that was held in great veneration by the people; and among those who entered a protest in the journals of the house, when the majority rejected the bill, was prince George of Denmark, duke of Cumberland. The court had not recollected themselves from the consternation produced from such a vigorous oppofition, when the earl of Shrewsbury pro.. duced another bill for triennial parliaments, provided that there should be an annual session ; that if, at the expiration of the three years, the crown should not order the writs to be issued, the lord chancellor, or keeper, or commissioner of the great feal, should iffue them ex officio, and by authority of this act, under fevere penalties. The immediate object of this bill was the diffolution of the present parliament, which had already fat three sefsions, and began to be formidable to the people, from its concessions to the ministry. The benefits that would accrue to the constitution from the establishment of triennial parliaments were very well understood, as these points had been frequently discussed in formier reigns. The courtiers now objected, that frequent clections would render the freeholders proud and infolent, encourage faction among the electors, and intail a continual expence upon the member, as he would find himself obliged, during the whole time of his sitting, to behave like a candidate, conscious how soon the time of election would revolve. In spite of the ministerial interest in the upper house, the bill passed, and contained a proviso, that the present parliament should not continue any longer than the month of Jan, Hary next ensuing. The court renewed its efforts

against

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