Demokratisierung als Ziel der amerikanischen Besatzungspolitik in Deutschland und Japan, 1943-1947

Front Cover
LIT Verlag Münster, 2001 - Democratization - 315 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Demokratisierungspolitik und die populären Bilder der Feinde
31
Die Arbeit in den Planungsstäben für die Deutschlandpolitik
66
Die Arbeit in den Planungsstäben für die Japanpolitik
98
Das Mitspracherecht der Alliierten bei der Demokratisierungsplanung
126
Die amerikanische Demokratie als Vorbild für die Demokratisierung
138
Totalitäre Systeme als Gegensatz von Demokratie
158
Demokratisierungspolitik als Handlungsanweisung und Methode
195
Demokratisierungspraktiken in Deutschland und Japan
218
Die Befreiung des öffentlichen Raumes eine Zusammenfassung
254
Ausblick Demokratisierung und der Kalte Krieg
262
Quellen und Literaturverzeichnis
264
Anhang
294
Orts Personen und Sachregister
306
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - Genealogy does not resemble the evolution of a species and does not map the destiny of a people. On the contrary, to follow the complex course of descent is to maintain passing events in their proper dispersion; it is to identify the accidents, the minute deviations — or conversely, the complete reversals — the errors, the false appraisals, and the faulty calculations that gave birth to those things that continue to exist and have value for us...
Page 26 - Genealogy does not pretend to go back in time to restore an unbroken continuity that operates beyond the dispersion of forgotten things; its duty is not to demonstrate that the past actively exists in the present, that it continues secretly to animate the present, having imposed a predetermined form to all its vicissitudes. Genealogy does not resemble the evolution of a species and does not map the destiny of a people.
Page 135 - We call upon the government of Japan to proclaim now the unconditional surrender of all Japanese armed forces, and to provide proper and adequate assurances of their good faith in such action. The alternative for Japan is prompt and utter destruction.
Page 120 - We hereby undertake for the Emperor, the Japanese Government and their successors to carry out the provisions of the Potsdam Declaration in good faith...
Page 129 - We are resolved upon the earliest possible establishment with our Allies of a general international organisation to maintain peace and security. We believe that this is essential, both to prevent aggression and to remove the political, economic and social causes of war through the close and continuing collaboration of all peace-loving peoples.
Page 135 - The Japanese Government shall remove all obstacles to the revival and strengthening of democratic tendencies among the Japanese people. Freedom of speech, of religion, and of thought, as well as respect for the fundamental human rights shall be established.
Page 12 - • / the spirit which is not too sure that it is right...
Page 26 - ... identify the accidents, the minute deviations - or conversely, the complete reversals the errors, the false appraisals, and the faulty calculations that gave birth to those things that continue to exist and have value for us; it is to discover that truth or being do not lie at the root of what we know and what we are, but the exteriority of accidents.
Page 36 - No nation in all the world that is free to make a choice is going to set itself up under the Fascist form of government, or the Nazi form of government, or the Japanese warlord form of government. Such forms are the offspring of seizure of power followed by the abridgement of freedom. Therefore, the United Nations can properly say of these forms of government two simple words: "Never again.
Page 120 - We hereby proclaim the unconditional surrender to the Allied Powers of the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters and of all Japanese armed forces and all armed forces under Japanese control wherever situated.

Bibliographic information