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COMPARATIVE STATEMENT,

Showing the monthly arrivals of Steamboats at the Port of St. Louis, from New Orleans, the Ohio River, Illinois River,

Upper Mississippi, Missouri River, Cairo, and other points, during the past five years, viz: 1847, ’18, ’19, '50 and '51.

New Orleans.

Ohio River.

Ilinois River.

Upper Mississippi. Missouri River.

Cairo.

Other Points.

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51

Total 502 446 313 301 300 430 429 406 493 457 658 690 686 788 634717697 806 635 639 314 327 355 390 301 146 194 122 75 119 201 396 217 215 175

A TABLE

Showing the monthly arrivals of Steamboats and Barges, Keel and Flat Boats, with their respective Tonnage,

Wharfage, Harbor Master's fees, &c., for the years 1850 and 1851.

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2 14129 23942 $683 80 $1777 52| $54 70 $106 65 $629 10 $1670 87
1 37241 29013 1825 50 2002 17 146 04 120 13 1679 46 1882 04
4 | 81969 718194091 90 5630 49 327 35 337 83 3764 55 5292 66
5 79505 73069 3865 75 5048 94 309 26 302 94 3556 49 4746 00
13 71825 98371 3566 15 6974 421 285 29 418 46) 3280 86 6555 96
2 72984 57938! 4048 92 3066 851 232 01 184 01 3839 71 2882 84
0 43196 40273 3137 10 2493 91 188 22 149 63 2948 88 2344 28
1 51789 62842 3518 87 4819 99 211 13 288 601 3907 74 4520 39
7 54610 59066) 3870 48 4132 721 232 23 247 96 3638 25 3884 76

58268 57729 4267 15 4132 49 250 03 249 95 3917 12 3884 54
7 | 82980 73441 5718 46 5159 09 343 11 309 54 5375 35 4849 55
0 34756 35637 2601 00 2927 45 156 06 175 651 2444 94 2752 80

Arrivals of
steamboats

and barges.
1850. 1851.

MONTHS.

January..

64 112
February ....173 154
March .400 354
April

..349 315
May 312 414
June ..334 210
July

218 162
August ...

..276 269
September... 259 258
October......274 244
November ...412 347
December 168 164

Total...2339 3003

115

43 681256 683140$41195 08 $48156 04 $27354382892 35438382 44 $45266 69 FOREIGN IMPORTS AT ST. LOUIS.

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Statement of foreign merchandize imported, and duties paid at St. Louis, during the year ending 31st of December 1851-made from the report of W. W. Greene, surveyor of the port of St. Louis.

......

Foreign merchandize imported into St. Louis in the

year 1851 and entered here, the foreign value of which amounts to

$757,509 00 Foreign merchandize entered at other ports in 1851,

and now in transportation, under bond for the payment of duties at St. Louis, the entries being received, the foreign value of which is

107,902 00 Amount of duties on foreign merchandize collected in 1851

239,318 68 Amount of duties unpaid for on merchandize in store 31st December, 1851,

8,261 89 Amount of duties unpaid on merchandize in transit from other ports destined to this port,

32,679 20 Amount of duties paid and accruing on mdz. imported for this port in 1851

280,259 77

Of the above, exclusive of the said merchandize in

transit, there was imported from England mer

chandize, the foreign value of which ..... From France,...

Germany and Holland “ Spain and Dependencies,.. 66 Brazil, ..

406,113 00 38,404 00 23,239 00 220,770 00 68,983 00

Total foreign value,

$757,509 00 The general description of merchandize imported, entered for consumption and warehoused in the year, and foreign value thereof, is as follows, viz : Sugar and Molasses,

$289.753 00 Hardware, etc.,

133,101 00 Railroad Iron,

100,211 00 Earthenware,

98,786 00 Tin plates, Tin, Iron, Copper, etc.,

81,482 00 Brandy, Wines, Gin, Cordials, etc.,

24,712 00 Dry Goods and Fancy Goods,

24,287 00 Burr Stones,

2,259 00 Drugs and Medicines,

2,618 00

Total........

$757,509 00

$2,941 00

Hospital money collected at this port in 1851,...... Hospital money expended at this port in 1851, for relief of sick and disabled boatmen,

$3,441 44

Commerce between the United States and Mexico.

Statistical view of the commerce of the United States with Mexico, exhibiting the value of the exports to and imports from Mexico from the year 1829 to 1850-derived from official documents. Years. Exports. Imports. Years. Exports. Imports. 1829, $2331151 $5026761 | 1840, $2515341 $4175001 1830,

4837458 5235241 1841, 2036620 3284957 1832, 3467541 4293954 1812, 1531233 1995696 1833, 5408091 5452818 | 1844, 1794833 2387002 1834, 5265053 8066068 1945, 1152331 1702936

9029221 9490446 | 1846, 1531180 1836621 1836, 6041635 5615819 i 1847, 692428 746818 1837, 8880323 5654202 1848, 4058436 1581247 1838, 2164097 3500709 1819, 2090868 2216719 1839, 2787362 3127153 | 1850, 2012827 2135366

1835,

LITERARY DEPARTMENT.

TRIBUTE TO LABOR.

1

Labor is creator. To it we owe our devotion, our life. We were born in and to labor, and without labor we cannot live. Food and honor even come from labor. "He who does not work, neither shall he eat.'

"Honors best thrive, When rather from our acts we them derive

Than our foregoer:' The merchant works for money, the thinker works for glory. He who inherits only the name, without accumulating and benevolently diffusing either the wealth or the honor of his sires, is less worthy than he who, springing from the stream of ordinary blood, wins both by his own heroic energies. That is society's slave. This is nature's noble man.

Claude Melnotte sprang from an humble origin, but the soul of & hero was in him. By the light of his midnight lamp, with patient toil, he gathered treasures of knowledge, from the works of those who had gone before him. Knowledge gave him power. Firmly fixed on his own self-reliance, continually progressing in the wealth and the power of knowledge, he built himself up with the mass of information and standard materials around him, which he combined with his own intrinsic elements. He became a finished scholar. His reason and his polished arts maintained a graceful proportion with his strong understanding and common sense beneath, and his brilliant fancy and luxuriant imagination above. Claude Melnotte was a laborer, he was a self-made man. He won wealth and honor, and what is more he won, and still keeps winning the hearts of all worth having.

The Serf in 'Love' is another instance of the wealth and honor that awaits the man of labor.

But the inert lounger may smile and say that Claude Melnotte and the Serf are merely fancy sketches. But is Fancy to be scorned, when like an Angel of mercy she descends from her home in the skies, to take the honest workman by the hand, and lead him in the way of fame and fortune? Every man of sense, who has the happiness of the people and the honor of his country at heart, will not only admire, but will entertain an emotion for Fancy amounting almost to reverence, when he sees her thus engaged in

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