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and other kindred subjects, beg leave to offer the following as a substitute, and recommend their adoption by this meeting:

Resolved, That, in the opinion of this meeting, it is a matter of vital importance to the interests of the people of Arkansas, that a Journal should be immediately established, at some central point in the State, to be exclusively devoted to the encouragement of all industrial pursuits, in fostering and developing the commercial, agricultural, mineral, and manufacturing resources of our conntry, in advancing the great cause of education, literature, the arts and sciences, amongst us; and to advocate the consolidation of the Internal Improvement and Seminary Funds, under the control of Boards of Internal Improvement and Education executed, in such form, and with such authority, as will give full life and vigor to those purposes, and tend to the permanent social and moral advancement of the condition of our people. And, also, that it shall be one of the primary objects of the Journal, to cultivate the spirit of peace, and to seek, with earnestness, to eradicate from the minds of our people all ancient animosities, and to dissipate all political, social, commercial and sectional jealousies, and, in a word, to pursue such a course as shall prove the initial point from which to mark a new era in the history of our State, and from which her people may march proudly onward and upward to the fulfillment of her glorious destiny.

Resolved, That we call upon our people, everywhere, to come up, and, as we now do, to pledge themselves to aid in finally establishing and liberally sustaining a journal, conducted by men of acknowledged ability, for the objects above set forth.

Mr. Newton introduced the following resolution :

Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to receive subscriptions to a Journal of the character indicated by the resolutions adopted by this meeting; and, whenever a sufficient number of copies shall be subscribed, to warrant the establishment of such a press, to make such arrangements as will speedily carry into effect the objects sought to be obtained.

Which was read and adopted; and Messrs. Caleb Langtree, John M. Ross, Col. A. Fowler, Gen. Wm. E. Ashley, and Geo. C. Watkins, appointed such committee.

Mr. Newton introduced the following resolution :

Resolved, That the chairman of this meeting appoint, at his leisure, some suitable person in each county in this State, to receive subscriptions to the Journal to be established under resolutions of this body.

(Fro.n the Arkansas State Gazette and Demoerat.)

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT.

VALUE OF BREADSTUFFS, ETC., EXPORTED FROM THE

UNITED STATES. Statement, exhibiting the aggregate value of Breadstuff's and Provisions, exported annually, from 1821 to 1850, inclusive.

Year3. Value. Years. Value. | Years. Value. 1821...$12,311,901 1831... $17,538,2:27 1811......$17,196,102 1822... 13.886,856 1832.... 12,424,703 1812...... 16,902,876 1823... 13,767,847 1833.... 14,209,128 1813*..... 11,204,123 1824... 15,059,4811834.... 11,524,021814...... 17,970,135 1825... 11,634,149 1835.... 12,009,399,1845...... 16,743,421 1826... 11,303,196 1836.... 10,614,130 1846...... 27,701,121 1827... 11,685,556 1837.... 9,588,359 1847...... 68,701,921 1828... 11,461,1441838.... 9,636,659 1848...... 37,472,751 1829... 13,181,858 1839.... 14,147,779 1849...... 39,155,507 1830... 12,075,0301810.... 19,067,535 1850...... 26,051,373

1851...... 21,918,653 Total........

........$557,155,938

.

· We have been induced to publish the following statistics of British and American Shipping, for the purpose of correcting an erroneous opinion, which prevails to a considerable extent in this country, that our Mercantile marine is now greater than that of Great Britain. We have not examined the official documents from which the following tables have been made up; but the source whence we obtain them:-the “MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE”—is good authority for their correctness.

Tonnage of the United Kingdom and the United States compared.

In compliance with the request of a correspondent, we have compiled with great care, from official documents, British and American, for the pages of the Merchants' Magazine, the subjoined comparative statement of the tonnage of Great Britain and her colonies, and the United States. The tonnage of the United

) For nine months ending June 30th, 1813.

Kingdom, for want of the official data, we have only brought down to 1876, while that of the United States embraces the year 1850:

A TABLE, SHOWING THE TONXAGE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM AND COLONIES,
FROM 1821 To 1816, AND THAT OF THE UNITED STATES FROM 1821 TO

NCLUSIVE.
United States.

United Kingdom and Colonies. Years. Registered. Enrolled & licensed. Total. United K'gd'in. Colonies. Total Tons.

Tons.

Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons. 1821 619396 40 679062 30 | 1298958 70 | 2355853 | 204350 2560-203 1822

628150 41 696548 71 1321699 172315408 203611 2519044 1823 639920 76 696644 87 1336565 68 2302867 | 203893 2506760 18241 669972 60 719190 37 1389163 02 2348314 | 211273 / 2559587 1825 700787 08 722323 69 1423110 77 | 2328307 | 214875 2543682 1826 737978 15 796210 68 1534189 83 2411461 224183 2635614 1827 747170 44 873437 34 1620607 78 | 2181138 279362 2460500 1828 8126 19 34 928772 52 1741391 87 | 2193300 324891 2518191 1829 650112 88 610654 88 1260797 81 21999.59 317041 2517000 1830 576675 33 615311 10 1191776 43 2201592 330227 2531819 1831 620451. 92 617394 32 1267846 29 2224356 357608 2581964 1832 686989 77 752460 39 1439150 21 2261860 356008 2618088 1833 750126 72 856123 22 1606149 94 2271301 363276! 2634577 1831 8574438 42 901468 67 1758907 14 2312355 | 403745 2716100 1835 885821 60 939118 49 1824910 14 2360303 423458 2783761 1836 897774 51 98 1328 14 1882102 65 2349749

439897 | 27926-16 1837 i 810447 29 1086238 40 1896685 69 2333521 457497 2791018 1839 822591 86 | 1173047 89 1995639 80 24207594698422890601 1839 834244 54 1262234 27 2096478 81 2401346 497798 2899114 1840 899761 74 1280999 35 2180764 16 2584408 543276 3127684 1811 815803 42 1184940 90 2130744 37 2935399 577081 3512480 1842 975358 74 | 1117031 90) 2090390 69 3041420 578430 3619850 1813 1009305 01 1149297 92 2158601 93 3007581 580806 3588387 1841 1068761 91 1211330 11 2280095 07 3044392 59.28393637231 18-15! 1095172 44 1321829 57 2417002 06 3123180 5908813714061 1846 / 1131286 49 | 1431798 32 2562084 81 3199785 | 617327 3817112 1847 | 1241312 92 | 1597732 80

2839045 77 1848 1360886 85 1793155 00 3154011 85 1849 1438911 53 1895073 71 333-1015 29 1830 / 1585711 22 1949743 01 | 3535454 23.......

From the above table it will be seen that the increase of the tonnage of the United Kingdom and colonies in 1846 over 1821 was 1,259,900; while the increase of tonnage in the United States during the same time—that is, from 1821 to 1846- amounted to 1,263,126, and from 1821 to 1850, the increase of our tonnage appears to be 2,236,496 tons.

The Mercantile Marine of England and the United States.

From the annual report of the “Trade and Navigation” of the United Kingdom presented to both Houses of Parliament for the year ending January 5th, 1851, and from the annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury, on “Commerce and Navigation," for the year ending June 30th, 1850, we are enabled to lay before

.............

the readers of the Merchants' Magazine the subjoined comparison of the mercantile marine of England and the United States:UNITED KINGDOM-ENTERED INWARD AND CLEARED OUTWARD.

Entered inward. Cleared outw'd. Total.
Tons.

Tons. Tons. Unit. K'gd'm and its dependencies 4078544 3960764 8039308 Foreign.......

.... 2035151 1946214 3981866 Total..

...6113696 5906978 12020674 UNITED STATES-ENTERED INWARD AND CLEARED OUTWARD.

Entered inward. Cleared outw'd. Total.
Tons.

Tons. Tons. American ships .....

.... 2573016 2631788 5205804 Foreign ships ........

..........1775623 1728214 3483837 Total...........................43486394361002 8689641 It will be seen, by the preceding statement, that the entrances and clearances of the United Kingdom exceeded those of the United States by 3,331,033 tons. Should the United States continue to gain on the United Kingdom in the same ratio they have for the last ten years, before 1855 the commercial supremacy will be transferred to the United States. It is clear that the repeal of the British Navigation Laws has not diminished the freights of the United Kingdom.

un

LOUISIANA BANKS. Cendition of the Banks of New Orleans on 30th of August 1851, as published by the Louisiana Board of Currency. Extracted from the Merchants' Magazine.'

CASH LIABILITIES.

CASH ASSETS.
Circulation. Total. Specie. Total.
Specie paying-
Louisiana Bank ............ $1,063,089 $4,219,259 $1,992,766 $5,913,836
Canal Bank .............. 931,755 2.122,712 837,618 3,270,483
Louisiana State Bank ...... 1,109,400 3,604,799 1,167,326 3,734,711
Mecbanics' & Traders' Bank 818,845 2,238,868 986,964 2.903,613
Union Bank ..............

25,565
27,452

9,733

361,200 Non-Specie payingCitizens' Bank ............

10,781 11,786 4,159 11,059 Consolidated .............. 7,234 9,314 2,318 2,318

Total ............ ...... $3,968,670 $12,234,193 $5,000,386 $16,197,221

TOTAL MOVEMENT AND DEAD WEIGUT.

Liabilities exclusive of capital. Assets.
Specie paying-
Louisiana Bank ...................... $1,219,259 38

$8,993,551 26 Canal and Banking Co. ................ 2,122,712 64

6,356,298 15 Louisiana State Bank .................. 3,604,799 88

5,917,682 99 Mechanics' and Traders' Bank .......... 2,238,968 85

4,289,565 92 Union Bank ........

27,152 64

4,358,432 05 Non-Specie payingCitizens' Bank ........................ 6,595,941 31

5.942,697 35 Consolidated Association ................ 1,566,747 15

1,217 049 78

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LITERARY DEPARTMENT.

SPIRIT GLORY,

(Conclusion.) 'Grandeur of spirit is derived from patience. Boldness is as requisite in bearing as in daring trials. Unpopular patience is one of the sublimest virtues. Pollok says that Lord Byron

"Soared untrodden hights and seemed at home,

Where Angels bashful looked!' And Byron said in his conversation with Capt. Medwin: 'I had an idea of writing a "Job,' but I found it too sublime. There is no poetry to be compared with it!' Byron had too much of the 'earth earthy' in his nature. He would not devote himself to spirit culture. His brilliant life swaled away, like a burning candle in a draft. With melancholy sincerity he himself acknowledges his weakness on this point. Alas,' he says:

Alas! our young affections run to waste,

Or water but the desert, whence arise
But weeds of dark luxuriance, tares of haste,

Rank at the core, though tempting to the eyes,
Flowers whose wild odors breathe but agonies,

And trees whose gums are poison, such the plants
That spring beneath her steps, as passion flies

O’er the world's wilderness, and vainly pants

For some celestial food, forbidden to its wants!' Byron had not spirit-power enough—he could not bear to be patient. He had no patience with his mother. He had no patience with his wife. Ho had no patience with his neighbor. He had no patience with his God.

Though gifted with the most radiant mental brilliancy — with a food of intellectual light — he groped in moral darkness. “The light within him was darkness.' His idea of morality, like that of many respectable intellects of the present day, was only a "dream of darkness.' Men of bright intellects are sometimes called stars, but, too often, like the stars he saw, as he himself confesses:

'I had a dream which was not all a dream!' they "wander darkling in the eternal space.' Byron won a mental --but lost a spirit-glory, and they who follow in his track, chasing the ignes fatui of worldly glory, will likely find them being extinguished in a slough.

The man of Uz was the greatest of all the men of the East. His Fordly estate was prince-like. His mental resource star-like. His

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