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3. The aflidavit of Mr. Patrick Began, setting forth the birth, baptism, citizenship, and arentage of said John H. Rogers, and o. certificate of the clerk of the city and county of ew York, thereto annexed.

4. My o\vn affidavit setting forth my citizenship, the owning of real estate, which I could not own unless a citizen, or had declared my intention of becoming such; the birth and citizenship of, and the exercise of the elective franchise by, my son John H. Rogers.

5. The aflidavit of William I. Bnnnell, an inspector of election in the election held in the first district of the fifteenth ward of the city of Brooklyn, November, 1866, setting forth the citizenship, registry of, and exercise of the elective franchise by, John H. Rogers thereat.

6. The afidavit of John Pettin er to the same effect, together with a certificate of the clerk of the county of Kings that the o cer administering the oaths was authorized to act.

7. A certificate from the clerk of the city of Brooklyn to the effect that the names of said William I. Bnnnell and George Pettinger appear as inspecfors of said election, and that the name of John H. Rogers is on the oll-list as a voter.

I may be permitted to state that it is scarcely possible to make out aclearer case of American citizenship, under like circumstances, than that developed and proven in the enclosed papers. You will confer a favor by sending to me your acknowledgment of their receipt by you, and by making such demands for his release, of those in whose custody my son is imprisoned, as the laws of this glorious republic and the honor of our flag demand.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, -
PATRICK ROGERS.

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Be it remembered, that on the eleventh day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, Patrick Rogers, at present of the city of New York, ap cared in the marine court of the city of New York, (the said court being a court of record, raving a common law jurisdiction and a clerk and seal,) and applied to said court to be admitted to become a citizen of the United States of America, pursuant to the directions of the act of Congress of the United States of America, entitled “An act to establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on that subjcct;” and also to an act entitled “An act in addition to an act entitled ‘An act to establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on that subiect;’ " and also to an act entitled “An act supplementary to the acts heretofore passed on the subject of a uniform rule of naturalization,” passed 30th day of July, 1813; and to the act relative to evidence in cases of naturalization, passed 22d March, 1816; and an act in further addition to an act to establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on that subject, passed May 26, 1824 ; and an act entitled “An act to amend the acts concerning naturalization,” passed May 24, 182.8; and the said Patrick Rogers having thereupon produced to the court such evidence, made such declaration and renunciation, and taken such oaths as are by said acts required:

Thereupon, it was ordered by the said court that the said Patrick Rogers be admitted, and he was accordingly admitted by the court a citizen of the United States of America.

In testimony whereof, the seal of the said court is hereunto affixed this eleventh day of April, in the sixty-third year of the independence of the United States.

Per curiam: JOHN BARBERIE, Clerk. |_Marine court of the city of New York, L. s.]

No. 2.

Marine court of the city of New York.

STATE on NEW Yonx,
City and County of New York, ss:

Patrick Bagan, being duly sworn, saith that be, this deponent, knows and is well acquainted with Patrick Rogers, and that he, the said Patrick Rogers, has resided within the United States five years at least, and within the State of New York one year at least ; and further, that during that time he has behaved as a. man of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and

appiness of the same. PATRICK BAGAN.

Sworn in open court the 11th day of April, 1839.
JOHN BARBERIE, Clerk.

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I, Patrick Rogers, do declare on oath, before the marine court of the city of New York, that I will support the Constitution of the United States; and that I do absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty whatever, and particularly to the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great

Britain and Ireland, of whom I was before a subject. hi :1

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I, Lawrence Clancy, clerk of the city of New York, do hereby certify that the above is a true copy of the original on file in said court, and that the said Patrick Rogers was there

upon duly admitted a citizen of the United States. . In witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said court

this 15th day of March, 1867. LAWRENCE CLANCY, Clerk

Sworn in open court the 11th day of April, 1839.

[Marine court of the city of New York, L. S.]

No. 3.

UNITED STATES or AMERICA,
State of New York, City and County of New York, as :

Patrick Began, being duly sworn, says that he resides at Locust Grove, in the town of Newtown, county of Queens, and State of New York, and that he well knows John H. Rogers, now imprisoned in Mountjoy rison, at or near Dublin, Ireland; that deponent knows said

John H. Rogers from his birt , which took place at the city of New York on the 15th day

of March, 1839 : and that deponent acted in the capacity of godfather at the baptism of said John H. R0 ers, within a few days after his birth as aforesaid; that Patrick Rogers, the father of said John H. Rogers, also well known to deponent, is and has been for upwards of twenty-five years a duly naturalized citizen of the United States, and for many years an owner of real estate in the county of Kings, in said State, and a. voter; and that said John H. Rogers is, and since the 15th day of March, 1860, has been, a native-born citizen of the Unite States, and has exercised the elective franchise as such. PATRICK BAGAN. Sworn before me this 15th day of March, 1867. HUGH G. CONNELL, Commissioner of Deeds.

STATE on NEW YORK,
City and County of New York, ss :

I, William C. Connor, clerk of the city and county of New York. and also clerk of the supreme court for the said city and county, being a court of record,-do hereby certify that Hugh G. Connell, before whom the annexed deposition was taken, was at the time of taking the same a commissioner of deeds of New York, dwelling in said city and county, duly appointed and sworn, and authorized to administer oaths to be used in any courts in said State and for general purposes, and that his signature thereto is genuine, as I verily believe.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and aflixed the seal of the said city and county the 15th day of March, 1867.

[New York, L. s.]
WM. C. CONNOR, Clerk.

No. 4.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
State of New York, County of Kings, City of Brooklyn, so .'

Patrick Rogers. being dul sworn, says that he resides at No. 275 Grand street, in said city, county, and State ; an that he is, and for twenty-seven years has been, a duly naturalized citizeu of the United States, and an owner of real estate in said county for fifteen years past; and that he is the father of John H. Rogers, nowimprisoned in Mountjoy rison, at or n r Dublin, Ireland; and that said John H. Rogers was born in the city 0 New York on the fifteenth day of March, 1839, and on the fifteenth day of March, 1860, became, and now is, a citizen of the United States of America; and that at every election in said city, since the said fifteenth day of March, 1860, the said John H. Rogers exercised the elective franchise

by voting thereat, as became his duty as a good and faithful citizen. PATRICK ROGERS.

JOHN M. FLYNN Commissioner of Deeds, Kings County, City of Brooklyn.

Sworn before me this 13th day of March, 1867.

No. 5.

UNITED Srrrrns or AMERICA,
State of New York, County of Kings, City of Brooklyn, as :

William I. Bunnell, being duly sworn, says that he resides at No. 241 South First street, in the fifteenth ward of the city of Brooklyn, and that he knows John H. Rogers, now imprisoned in Mountjoy prison, at or near Dublin, Ireland ; and that said John H. Rogers was, and is, a citizen of the United States of America, is duly registered as a voter according to law, and voted at the election held in said city in November, A. D. 1866; and that at said election deponent was a citizen and voted and acted in the capacity of inspector, having been thereto duly appointed to receive votes deposited by citizens in the exercise of the elective franchise, and personally received the vote of said John H. Rogers thereat.

WILLIAM I. BUNNELL.

JOHN M. FLYNN, Commissioner of Deeds, Kings County, City of Brooklyn.

Sworn before me this 14th day of March, 1867.

No. 6.

Unrren Srirres or Amnmcs,
State of New York, County of Kings, City of Brooklyn, as :

George W. Pettinger, being duly sworn, says that he resides at 276 South Second street in the fifteenth ward of the city of Brooklyn, and that he knows John H. Rogers, now im prisoned in Monntjoy prison, at or near Dublin, Ireland ; and that said John H. R0 era was, and is, acitizen of the United States of America, is duly registered as a voter accor in to law, and voted at the election held in said city November, A. D. 1866 ; and that at sli election deponent was an inspector of election, duly appointed to receive votes deposited by citizens in the exercise of the elective franchise.

GEORGE W. PETTINGER.

JOHN M. FLYNN, Commissioner of Deeds, Kings County, City of Brooklyn.

Sworn before me this 14th day of March, 1867.

STATE or New Yonx, County of Kings, ss .

I, John J. White, clerk of the county of Kings, and clerk of the supreme court of the State of New York in and for the said county, (said court being a court of record,) do hereby certify that John M. Flynn, before whom the annexed deposition was taken, was, at the time of taking the same, a commissioner of deeds in and for the city of Brook] 11, in said county, dwelling in said city, commissioned and sworn and duly authorized to ta e the same; and further, that I am well acquainted with the handwriting of such commissioner, and verily believe the signature to said deposition is genuine.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and atfixed the seal of said county and court, this 15th day of March, 1867.

[sun] JOHN J. WHITE, Clerk.

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CITY CLERK'S OFFICE, Brooklyn, March 15, 1867.

I, Henry McCloskey, clerk of the city of Brooklyn, do hereby certify that the names ot William I. Bunnell and George W. Pettinger appear on the poll-list of the first district of

the fifteenth ward of the city of Brooklyn, now on file in this oflice, as inspectors of the election held November 6, 1866.

And I further certify that on the said poll-list the name of John H. Rogers, residing at 275 Grand street, Brooklyn, appears as a voter as having voted the State, assembly, judiciary, city, and ward ballots, respectively, at said election.

[SEAL] HENRY MCCLOSKEY, City Clerk.

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward.

No. 1343.] LEGATION or THE UNITED STATES, London, March 27, 1867. SIR : I have to acknowledge the reception of despatches from the department numbered 1941 and 1942. '

I likewise received yesterday morning a telegram with instructions for Judge Redfield, which I communicated at once to him.

I transmit herewith copies of the Times containing a report of the debate in the House of Commons on the second reading of the bill for the extension of the franchise. The concessions made by the ministry will now carry the measure into committee of the whole on the 8th of the next month, where it must undergo extensive modifications before it can be made acceptable to the opposition. In that event the course which the government will take is not altogether clear. In view of the speeches made by some of the members it is more than doubtful whether they couldconsent to keep on with it beyond that point.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. WILLIAM H. SnwARn, ' Secretary of State, Washington, D. G.

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SIR: I acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 8th of March, No.

1334, in which you give me, briefly, what is evidently very accurate, as it is

important, information concerning the recent disturbances in Ireland. I avail myself of that information for the purpose of conferring with you informally and confidentially upon the condition of affairs between this government and that of Great Britain. _ . Y

I think myself not only entitled to assume, but bound to assume, thata chronic sedition is existing in. Ireland; that, as occasion shall offer, the late disturbances are not unlikely to be renewed, especially if there shall be a continued agitation of political questions in Great Britain. I assume it to be possible that somewhere and at some time a seditious party in Ireland may proclaim an organized insurrection with a show of delegated authority from some portions of the Irish people. Such a proceeding is intensely expected by many citizens of the United States. That expectation excitesa profound sympathy among adopted citizens of Irish birth and their descendants. It is equally manifest that the sympathy of the whole American people goes with such movements, for the reason that there is a habitual jealousy of British proximity across our northern border, and especially for the reason that this nation indulges a profound sense that it sustained great injury from the sympathy extended in Great Britain to the rebels during our civil war. The country has hoped and expected that in some way our complaints against Great Britain in that respect would be satisfactorily adjusted. It has been content to wait until now for that consummation.

But there are, on the other hand, important classes of our people whose patience in this respect is becoming exhausted. The House of Representatives, in the first session of the late Congress, with entire unanimity passed a bill to alter our

neutrality laws so as to accommodate them to the standard of neutrality which .

they understood was maintained during our civil war by Great Britain. The Senate did not concur, and so the bill failed. There are, however, unmistakable indications that the sentiments which controlled the action of the House of Representatives are now gaining favor in the other branch of Congress, as well as among the people.

It is to be expected that time will add to the strength of the interest which demands that projected modification of our neutrality laws; because, first, the sense of injury is intensified by the delay of negotiations; and because, secondly, many ship-builders and other merchants of the United States are now earnestly taking part in the question. I give you copies of certain resolutions just now

adopted in the House of Representatives bearing upon our relations with Great Britain.

Lord Stanley proposes an arbitration of the Alabama claims, with a preliminary condition that technical definitions shall be first given to the questions to be submitted.

In that form his ofl'er cannot be accepted, because it would permit a belief here that what are deemed just claims, absolutely entitled to redress, might be defeated by forms obstructive of a fair and full examination. On the other hand, what had been offered on our side is as fair and as liberal as Congress or the nation could be expected to sustain.

Time seems to me to have already become an important element in the question of adjustment. If delays are continued, it may perhaps pass beyond the reach of settlement by a friendly correspondence.

While writing this I am not to be understood as insisting that my views in regard to the situation in Great Britain are altogether correct. I may, indeed, entirely misunderstand the situation there. Nor am I unmindful of the critical nature of the political debates which are now occupying the attention of her Majesty’s ministers. It is not the President's desire to do anything which would be or would even seem to be unfriendly to Great Britain. At the same time I think it important that the ministry shall understand the increasing delicacy of the question as it stands in the United States. Your excellent judgment will enable you to determine whether any and what part of what I have said can be made known to Lord Stanley, with a hope of good effect. If such a communication in any form shall be expedient, then the selection of the time and manner in which it shall be made is also left to your discretion. Will you take the matter in hand and act in regard to it as shall seem best, giving me at least the result of your reflections.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

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Mr. Banks, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the following, which was adopted: ' Resolved, That this House extends its sympathy to the people of Ireland and of Candia in

all their just efforts to maintain the independence of states, to elevate the people, and to extend and perpetuate the principles of liberty.

JOINT RESOLUTION concerning the payment of claims made by foreign governments against the United States for property destroyed by the armies of the United States.

Be it resolved, 8rc., &c., That, in the opinion of this Congress, no claim made by other governments, or by citizens or subjects of other governments, for losses of property sustained by such governments, citizens, or subjects, during the recent rebellion, should be recognized or allowed by the executive departments of this government until the same shall have been submitted to Congress, with all the facts relating thereto.

Passed the House of Representatives of the United States March 27, 1867.

JOINT RESOLUTION respecting the proposed confederation of provinces on the northern frontier of the United States. ‘

Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, &c., Sm, That the people of the United States cannot regard the proposed confederation of the provinces on the northern

' frontier of this country without extreme solicitude. A confederation of states on this conti

nent, extending from ocean to ocean, established without consulting the people of the

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