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road Hotel, and give the word to the others. and immediately afterwards the van came in sight. Two of the men, whom he is able to identify, he saw drawing a revolver each, and they appeared so deliberate that he said to a neighbor, “ Good God, these men are going to fight a duel." He observed Allen, who was dressed in a light coat, with a pistol in each hand, and when he was not firing he was hammering away at the van. He saw him fire the shot into the van. ,

Edwin Walton, japanner, in Mr. Port’s employ, Ancoats, besides observing Allen, gave much of his attention to another man, who appeared to be an officer of the gang. He was well dressed, wore a hat, and the la pels of his coat were bordered with worked silk. He also had alight mustache. After t e rescue this witness joined in the pursuit. and while others chased Allen, he went after the well-dressed man. He came up with him at the wall near Ashton road, and helped to capture him. He also identified three others

James Mayer, a barman, identified Allen and two others. When Sergeant Brett came headlong out of the van, Allen, who had been off a little distance exchanging his discharged revolver for a fresh one, rushed to the front and swore he would shoot anybody dead who came near. After the fight the witness followed them. Kelly and Deasy were in liandcuffs.

When they got to a. wall Allen jumped up and got hold of Kelly’s arms to pull him after him, '

while some men below hoisted him at the same time. The other ofiicer tried to hel one of the other men over in the same way, but he could not and he ran away. This ot er man was captured. '

William Hughes, a locomotive fitter, in the employ of Boyer and Peacock, identified six of them. He saw Allen fire three times hile the constables were kept at bay. One of his shots took effect in Prowsen’s heel, whld cried, “My God, I'm shot!” (Prowsen was a bystander.) He also saw the other ofiicer, the man with the lappelled coat. He noticed that while they were waiting for the ,va.n to come up this man seemed to be receiving news and giving'orders. _

Thomas Sperry, in the employ of the Midland Railway Company, identified three as the men he saw running across the line, pursued and pelted by some platelaycrs. He did not know what had occurred at the time, but, as he said, the platelayers “ were making it so hot for them” that he could not help noticing it.

John Hayes, master brickburner, was in his croft during the melee. He saw the whole affair. Two of the men, whom he now identified, were trying to turn their horses’ heads towards Manchester, and, as they plunged 21. good deal, one of the men fired his revolverinto the animal’s nostrils, and then both of the men tried to pull the brute on his haunches. Allen at this time was keeping guard, daring the crowd to interfere. After Allen had fired several shots witness saw him go to a man on the other side of the arch and change pistols. Two other men, whom the witness identified, took a leading part. One of them, cautioning his comrades, said, “ Don’t shoot, or you’ll hit Allen.” (At this time Allen was in the van.) Larkin seemed to be taking charge of Deasy in the same way Allen was attending to Kelly. Witness followed the crowd as far as Beswick, and was present when Allen was

captured. Allen had then twenty rounds of cartridge for breech-loaders, but had been so hard pressed that he had not time to load.

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The two men who it was stated in yesterday’s paper were believed to be the Fenian leaders, known as Colonel Kelly and Captain Deasy, were again brought before the city

magistrates during the morning, for the purpose of a formal remand only; and it would _

appear that their friends, on learning of the capture, had determined not to let slip the opportunity of a rescue which might occur during the conveyance of the prisoners between the police court and the city jail. We regret to have to relate the success of this enterprise, attended with a scene of latal outrage which has naturally created the most painful excitement and smprise in the neighborhood where it occurred, so little accustomed are the inhabitants of this part of the kingdom either to see or to apprehend the triumph of an armed band of desperadoes over the agents of the law. The police van was stopped and broken open in the Hyde road, the captives were set free, and their guards were shot, one of them fatally. Some of the leading perpetrators of the crime were promptly secured, and it was probable that further arrests would be made last ni ht after this account was written. The affair seems to have been thoroughly organized be orehand, and carried out by a msolute commander. It is most unfortunate that the police were not prepared to resist such an attack, and that no report of the preparations made for it should have reached the authorities in time.

The account of the apprehension of the two men last week, and the report we published of the suspicion that they might turn out to be connected with the Fenian Inovement, would probably not attract as much attention as the event proves it to have merited. The circum

stances under which the were apprehended seemed to prove that they were prepared for violence, even iftbev di not contemplate it. The police had observed four men loiteringabout in a manner that might indicate that a robbery was being planned. It was between three and four o’clock on Wednesday morning. Two of them were accordingly taken into custody, while the others made their escape. The prisoners made a great resistance, but were overpowered. It had been noticed that they tried very hard to get their hands in their pockets. On being searched, each was found to have in his pocket a loaded revolver. The two men who spoke with an Irish-American accent, and said they were American citizens, were brought up and remanded by the city magistrates on the representation of Superintendent Maybury that he had reason for thinking it might prove that they were Fenian refugees. The subsequent communications with the Irish olice have led to their identification.

When the men were again placed in the dock yester ay, Superintendent Maybury, of the Manchester detective department, said he believed Inspector Williams, of London, had a communication to make to the bench. Mr. Williams said he had been instructed by the authorities at Scotland-yard to apply to the magistrates for a remand.‘ He had reason to believe that the two prisoners, who ave their names as John Wright and Martin Williams, were Colonel Kelly and Captain easy, both of whom were notorious leaders in the attempted Fenian rising in Ireland in March last. He produced the warrants which had been out for their arrest since that date. Mr. Nuttall, solicitor, who appeared on behalf of Mr. Ernest‘Jones, (who was said to have been retained for the defence,) acceded to the remand, and the prisoners were accordingly removed to the cells below. The court, especially the gallery, was densely crowded, and it 'as observed that the greater number of

those present appeared to take an intense interest in the proceedings. A considerable num

ber of strangers crowded the corridors and the open rooms below the court. After the court adiourned, which was about one o'clock, these same persons were still hoverin about, as if with the intention of waiting to see.the prisoners removed in the prison van. y the time the van arrived, which was not before three o’clock, the narrow street in the rear of the court-house was filled by an excited throng. A considerable force of police was told off to keep the van clear. Meanwhile, the attention of Superintendent Gee had been called to two men of soldierly appearance, who had been seen lounging about all the morning. He saw that they observed him, and from their suspicious and impudent inanner—they were humming Fenian airs—he infornied Inspector Garner that he thought they ought to be arrested. Inspector Garner and Constable Shaw went forthwith to arrest them. One of them made off and escaped. The other, a tall, powerful man, made a desperate resistance. He drew from his breast a long-handled, loose-springed knite, which on the blade being thrown forward became a formidable dagger, the spring tightening with a click. Inspector Garner seized his prisoner by the wrist, _and while he was in the act of wrenching the weapon out of his right hand, the fellow aimed a fearful blow with his left, which caught Constable Shaw full in the eye. Some more constables came upon the scene and completed the capture. The man was searched and handcufied. A few minutes afterwards the prisoners, including the “colonel" and the “ captain," were marched between a double row of C0nSl’&bllt]3t~§ to thés steps 0ft]h8\(718.I|. dA raiurmgr 1rose from the crowd as the prisoners, who were in andcu ,we-re ace insi et eve ice. The prison van then pirjoceeded through the city-in the direction of the jail. The van is dividid intohseparate compartmdeiits, eacgh intendedh for a pris0n<=i_r.h Ttile two genians, oget er wit several women an roun o s, weret e occu antso t eve icle, w ich was accompanied by eleven policemen? B€V9% be}sides the river ulpon it, and four following in a cab behipfii. b P0ll(i§-(‘0I1EItt(li)l(O:S Shalw and galrwréod, vgigh Detectigves Bromley dam}, Taylor, were on e ox: nox an onne were 0 tin an er eant rett was insi et e van in the middle compartment. The names of the four bflicers ingthe cab were Sergeant Hartley and Constables Trueman, Schofield, and Thompson. With the exception of Brett, who is said to havehad a cutlass, none of the police were armed otherwise than with their ordinary

. truncheons. The van proceeded quietly until they arrived at the railway arch, on the Hyde

road, near the clay pit=, not far from Messrs. Higginbottom &. Heywood’s paper works. The

oflicersin front, when they got to the arch, noticed acrowd of men, consisting ofaboutfifty "

or sixty, the majority of whom were armed with revolvers. - This crowd was composed of men dressed some in cloth and some in fustian; but there were not many in the garb of workingmen ; the majority seemed better dressed. They appeared to be acting in concert, and one man, who was known to be a Fenian, named William O’Meara Allen, appeared to be at-.ting_as the leader. The moment the van approached the arch Allen shouted to the driver to stop. This was followed immediately after bya volley of pistolshots. One of the policemen in the rear called to the driver to drive on. Simultaneously, however, the Fenians in front fired at the near horse and shot it through the neck, and the driver was knocked off his box with a, large stone. Some one then presented a pistol at Bromley and ‘shot him through the fleshy part of the thigh. Taylor was also knocked on the chest by a large stone. A moment afterwards the other horse was also shot. Several of the other ofiicers narrowly escaped being shot, and only saved themselves by ducking their heads as they were aimed at. The progress of the van was, of course, effectually prevented, and the mob set to work to liberate the occupants. About twenty of the assailantsI formed a cordon round the van, and kept the police at bay. Several bystanders joined with the police, and made arusli;

but, as they were unarmed, they could do nothing against a score of des erate men with loaded pistols. In the mean time the remainder of the gang had attacked t e van, and were trying to open it. They were armed with hatchets, hammers, and stones, with which they tried to force an entrance. The van, which is a very strong one, appeared to resist their efforts, till at last a party of men managed to haul a very large stone upon the roof, where they began to use it with great execution. They had soon pounded the top of the van into chips. The door was by this time nearly forced open, when _the leader, who had a pistol in each hand, put one to the lock, fired it, and burst the door open. The gradually increasing crowd of spectators had in the meantime made several rushes, but were easily defeated by the occasional fiiing of pistol shots. The police are of opinion that some of the pistols were not loaded with ball, for several times when they were fired point-blank, no effect followed. This might, however, have been the consequence of hasty aim. One of the bystanders, named Sproom. was shot through the ankle, and one of the policemen, Truenian, who was in the cab, and who came up to assist the others, receiveda shot in the back, which did no more than graze the skin. In addition to this several bullet marks were found on the arch. Theleader, Allen, was seen to fire five shots at the van before it was burst open. When the I}a'rty at the door had forced an entrance, the leader called to the prisoners to come out. hey were, of course. locked up invtheir separate compartments The leader then asked ‘Brett for the keys, but he refused to give them, upon which Allen fired. Brett was shot in the head, the ball entering at the eye and coming out near the top of the hat. Brett staggered out of the van as soon as Allen had possessed himself of the keys. Allen then released the two Fenians. The whole party then decainped across the fields in the direction of the Ashton road. Besides the two Fenians, four of the female prisoners took the opportunity to escape, their compartments having been unlocked.

Allen was seen going along in the company of Kelly, and was heard by the bystanders to say, “Kelly, I Wlll die for you.” Some young men in the crowd, in the employment of Messrs. Heywood and Higginbottom, gave chase. Allen, with one or two others. continued their flight over the fields. At Ashton road a police constable named Bradley joined in the chase and captured one of the party, named Michael Larkin, of Eliza street, City Road, Hulme. Another young man, named'Hunter, of Pendlebury, ran down Allen, and laid hold of him. He resisted violently, and threatened to shoot his pursuer with a revolver. Hunter, . however, who isa powerful young fellow, closed with him, wrested the pistol from him, and struck him with _it several blows on the head, causing a very ugly wound. Other assistance then came up, and the two we have named with a third, who was afterwards captured, were taken to Fairfield street station. Allen was identified by twenty or thirty witnesses as the leader of the gang, and the man who entered the van and shot Brett.

From the statements of eye-witnesses of all that took place on the Hyde road, we are enabled to add further details of some portions of what is related above. A very acute lockeron, who lives near the railway arch, had noticed a number of strange, suspicious-looking men loitering in the neighborhood all the morning. Some of them visited t e neighboring inn, the Railway Hotel, from time to time, and then went across the road into the unenclose field alon the line of railway. They were stifily built men, and some of them looked as if they had een soldiers. One of them was rather taller than the rest. He wasa fair~complexioned man, with a black coat and cap. He appeared to be the leader. Our informant felt sure that “ something was going to happen.” About four o'clock he was so occupied with watching the men that he did not see the prison van when it was coming up the road. He saw the tall man standing with ten or twelve others on a bank of clay on the opposite side of the road. He put up his hand, and. several other men who had been loitering about joined those on the bank, making the number from fifteen to twenty. The tall man, who acted as captain, then drew a revolver, which looked like a new one, and it shone in the light. The other men at once did the same. All the pistols were quite bright. At this moment the rumble of the van was heard, and the leader, as he seemed to be, stepped into the middle of the road, raised his revolver, and fired. At the firing of the shot, the constables were seen clambering down from the van as fast as they could. The other barrels of his revolver the same man then discharged at the horses. One of the animals plunged about a great deal, and it was afterwards found that it was shot in the back. In the mean time ot er shots were being .fired behind the van. and the oflicers driven off. By this time a great crowd of people had gathered together. A neighbor ran into his house to fetch a poker, and while he was inside a constable followed him and asked him if he had any arms. This constable (A 76) had been shot at, the ball passing through a portion of his uniform at the left side. As above stated, while some of the assailants kept back the constables and the crowd, others surrounded the van and began to break away into it. This they tried to do, Qome with hammers, others with an axe head, and others with stones. As soon as one of the panels gave way, the man who from the first had been set to act as captain presented his pistol through the opening, and was heard to demand the keys from somebody inside. The answer could not be heard through the din caused by the batterin of the stones and the hammers, and the shrieks of the women who were also in the van. he next thing observed was a captain firing a shot into the van. At this time the constables and some of the crowd made a rush at the van, but fell back on being fired at. Wheneveran attempt of this kind was made, there were always some men to jump to the front, so as to keep the way clear

between the constables and the van. On one of these occasions a bystander said to aneighbar of his, “They've fired all their shots: let’s make another rush.” They did so, and the next moment one of them exclaimed he was shot. When the van was broken open, the first thing seen was a constable with keys in his hand (Sergeant Brett) tumbling from the inside down the steps. He was bleeding from the temples, and his head looked as if it had been hit by some of the stones. The captain and some of his men stood at the door, calling out to the prisoners, "Come out.” A woman was among the first to get out. Afterwards a tall man with a dark moustache (“ Captain" Deasy) came out. and then followed a short, thickset man. ("Colonel" Kelly.) Both of the men looked as if they were still handcufijed. Nearl all the assailants crowded round, and whilst some of them hurried across the unenclose fields others remained behind, and fired more shots. The firing seemed quite at random, as if there were now no wish to wound, but only to keep the police atbay. Sergeant Brett was helped into a cab. He was speechless, and seemed dying. Other wounded men were attended to in the same way. The walls of the railway arch were found studded with shot marks. One of our informants saw the mortar fly off in flakes while the firing was going on. He afterwards counted nearly thirty of these marks. He also found a revolver in a neighbor's coal grid. It was quite new, with the exception of all the chambers having been fired off once, or perhaps twice. The injured menwere removed to the Royallnfirmary, where Brett died shortly after his arrival. The other persons wounded are expected to' recover.

Immediately on the receipt of the intelligence in town, the mayor and several of the city council, with the heads of the police department, assembled together, and consulted,as to the steps to be immediately taken for the recapture of the prisoners. A telegram was despatched to the Home Ofiice, and the cavalry regiment in Hulme barracks were called upon to be in readiness to defend any of the police stations if they were attacked. A strong force of police was on duty at each station.

In reply to the mayor’s telegram, the Home Ofiicehas ofi'ered areward for the recapture or Kelly and Deasy.

The prisoners first captured, including Allen, were removed during the evening, under a strong escort of the 8th Hussars,_from Fairfield street station to the central station in Albert street, where fifty of the 57th Foot, under Captain Halstead, remained on duty all night. The revolver which was found on Allen is perfectly new, and similarto the one in possession of Kelly when he was taken last week.

The country was scoured in all directions during the night, and before ll o'clock twelve to fifteen arrests had been reported from different places in the neighborhood. Some of those who offered resistance-got severely punished in the struggle. The last that was seen of Kelly and Deasy was near Clayton bridge. They were seen by some brickrnakers to go into a cottage, they then being in handcutfs. When they came out their hands were free. At 7.20 a porter at Heaton Norris saw two men run across the line into the 0 en country. He challenged them, but they did not stop. Inspector Gill and Constable Sc ofield took train to Stockport, and thence to Hazel Grove, but failed to fall in with them. In the meantime, a hot pursuit was kept up after Allen and others. When the constable overtook Allen he was already in custody, and had already been severely stoned about the head and body by some young men who said they saw him fire the shot that killed Sergeant Brett. Several other arrests were made about the same? time. Among the captured are two desperadoes who give the names of Martin and Gould. These men were conveyed in the first instance to the city jail, where they were so violent that it became necessary to put leg irons as well as handcuffs on them. Thus heavily chained and guarded by a military escort, they were taken in a cab to the station of the division, (Albert street,) where a large and excited crowd remained until a late hour last night. The man who shot at Constable Yarwood, and who was also among those arrested, has been identified by that ofiicer.

Sergeant Brett, who had been nearly thirty years in the force, is highly spoken of as an eflicient and trustworthy oflicer.

It is ascertained that the prison van was preceded on its way from the court in the afternoon towardsthe jail by a cab containing several of the assailants, who joined those who had previiously been seen loitering about the railway arch, and who appeared to take the comman . . - .

IDENTIFICATION OF ALL THE PRISONERS.

_An exoitin scene took place yesterday morning at the A division police station, on the occasion of t e prisoners eing placed in line for identification. A great crowd of people blocled Albert street, and manifested an intense eagerness to secure a good stand-point whence they could view the probable removal of the prisoners to the city court.

In the rear of the station the military were drawn up in line, each man having twenty rounds of ammunition. The risoners were arrayed along the main corridor, and as witness after witness passed up and own the line, the expression on the prisoners‘ countenances showed in _most cases that the men had something like the “courage of despair.” Occasionally some of the witnesses would have to repeat their walk up and down more than once. Not a word was spoken during each single progress. The several witnesses, after the inspec

tion, communicated their knowledge to a sergeant in charge. 1

Charles Thomas, a plumber and glazier, identified Allen, Larkin, and two others. He had observed them before, during, and after the affray. Before the attack he was watching them from over a wall, standing on a dog-kennel. He saw one of them run from the Hyderoad hotel and give the word to the others, and immediately afterwards the van came in sight. Two of the men, whom he is able to identify, he saw drawing a revolver each, and they appeared so deliberate that he said to a neighbor, “ Good God,. these men are going to fight a duel” He observed Allen, who was dressed in a light coat, with a pistol in each hand, and when he was not firing he was hammering away at the van. He saw him fire a shot into the van. ‘

Edwin Walton, a japanner, in Mr. Port‘s employ, Ancoats, besides observing Allen, gave much of his attention to another man, who appeared to be an officer of the gang. He was well dressed, wore a hat, and the lappels of his coat were bordered with worked silk. He also had alight moustache. After the rescue this witness joined in the pursuit, and while others chased Allen he went after the well-dressed man. He came up with him at the wafl near Ashton road, and helped to capture him. He also identified three others.

James Mayer, a barman, identified Allen and two others. When Sergeant Brett came headlong out of the van, Allen, who had been a little distance exchanging his discharged revolver for a fresh one, rushed to the front, and swore he would shoot anybody dead w 0 came near. After the fight the witness followed th'ern. Kelly and Deasy were in han¢k:ufl's. When they got to the wall, Allen jumped up and got hold of Kelly’s arms to pull him after him, while some men below hoisted him at the same time. The other officer tried to help one of the other men over in the same way, but he could not, and he ran away. This other man was captured.

William Hughes, a locomotive fitter, in the employ of Boyer & Peacock, identified six of them. He saw Allen fire three times while the constables were kept at bay. One of his shots took efi"ect in Prowsen’s heel, who cried, “My God, I’m shot!" He also saw the other oflicer, the man with the lapelled coat. He noticed, while they were waiting for the van to come up, this man seemed to be receiving news and giving orders.

Thomas Sperry, in the employ of the Midland Railway Company, identified three as the men he saw running across the line, pursued and pelted by some platelayers. He did not know what had occurred at the time, but, as he said, the platelayers “were making it so hot for them” that he could not help noticing it.

John Hays, master bricklayer, was in his croft during the mélée. He saw the whole affair. Two of the men whom he now identified were trying to turn the horses’ heads towards Manchester, and as they lunged a good deal one of the men fired his revolver into the animal’s nostrils, and then bot of the men tried to pull the brute on his haunches. Allen at this time was keeping guard, daring the crowd to interfere. After Allen had fired several shots, witness saw him go to a man on the other side of the arch and change pistols. Two other men, whom the witness identified, took a leading part. One of them, cautioning his comrades, said, “Don’t shoot, or you'll hit Allen.” (At this time Allen was in the van.). Larkin seemed to be taking charge of Deasy in the same way Allen was attending to Kelly. Witness followed the crowd as far as Beswick, and was present when Allen was captured. Allen had than twenty rounds of cartridge for breech-loaders, but had been so hard pressed that he had no time to load. '

The following are the names of the prisoners captured and the charges against them:

For wilful murder, William O’Meara Allen and Michael Larkin. . I

For riot and murder, William Martin, clerk, aged 35 years; William Gould, clerk, 30; Louis Moore, joiner, 56; Patrick Hogan, laborer, 26; John Carroll, laborer, 23; Charles Moorehouse, clerk, 22; John Gleeson, laborer, 42; Patrick Barragan, laborer, 49; Henry ‘Wilson, clothes dealer, 28, at whose house Kelly and Deasy were first apprehended; Michael Joseph Boyland, schoolmaster, 37 ; William Wells, laborer, 29; Mich l Corcoran, laborer, 29; Edward Shore, alias Short, traveller, 26; John Butler, weaver, 4; Patrick Oloney, scavenger, 69; Patrick Kelley, laborer, 35; Michael McGuire, clothes dealer, Smithfield market, 32; Patrick Dailey, tailor, 36; William Luther, striker, 19; James Woods, hackler, '22.

In the afternoon the prisoners were brought up at the city police court, and after some formal evidence had been given they were remanded for a week.

, The two Fenian leaders, at the time of writing, are still at large.

Mr. Adamsgto Mr. Seward.

No. 1457.] » LEGATION or THE UNITED STATES. ' ' London, September 23, 1867.

SIR : I have received information that Colonels Nagle and Warren have been transferred from Kilmainham jail, where they have been exposed to the rather

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