The Theological and Miscellaneous Works of Joseph Priestley, Volume 25

Front Cover
G. Smallfield, 1780 - Theology

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 103 - Cherish, therefore, the spirit of our people, and keep alive their attention. Do not be too severe upon their errors, but reclaim them by enlightening them. If once they become inattentive to the public affairs, you and I, and Congress and Assemblies, Judges and Governors, shall all become wolves. It seems to be the law of our general nature, in spite of individual exceptions...
Page 58 - Remove far from me vanity and lies : give me neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food convenient for me : lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the Lord 1 or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.
Page 79 - Dearly beloved, I beseech you as strangers and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul...
Page 21 - In his pleading he abhorred those too common faults of misreciting evidences, quoting precedents or books falsely, or asserting things confidently, by which ignorant juries, or weak judges, are too often wrought on. He pleaded with the same sincerity that he used in the other parts of his life, and used to say it was as great a dishonour as a man was capable of, that for a little money he was to be hired to say or do otherwise than as he thought.
Page 89 - Mankind will never be in an eminent degree virtuous and happy, till each man shall possess that portion of distinction, and no more, to which he is entitled by his personal merits.
Page 145 - The Unitarian Society for promoting Christian Knowledge and the practice of Virtue, by the distribution of books.
Page 326 - Lusts of the Flesh, the Lusts of the Eye, and the Pride of Life,' must be watched against and conquered.
Page 7 - Could I but get over some nice points, and conform to the practice and opinion of those about me, I might stand as fair a chance as others for dignities and preferment.
Page 392 - This I have heard him say many times. It was at his request, enforced by that of Dr. Fothergilj that I wrote an anonymous pamphlet, calculated to show the injustice and impolicy of a war with the colonies, previous to the meeting of a new parliament. As I then lived at Leeds, he corrected the press himself, and, to a passage, in which I lamented the attempt to establish arbitrary power in so large a part of the British empire, he added the following clause, " to the imminent danger of our most valuable...
Page 351 - A philosopher ought to be something greater and better than another man. The contemplation of the works of God should give a sublimity to his virtue, should expand his benevolence, extinguish every thing mean, base, and selfish in his nature, give a dignity to all his sentiments, and teach him to aspire to the moral perfections of the great Author of all things.

Bibliographic information