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Books Books 1 - 10 of 95 on I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion: but for my own part, I would rather....
" I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion: but for my own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure... "
An analytical inquiry into the principles of taste - Page 9
by Richard Payne Knight - 1805
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1729
...Opinion, but, for my own part, I would rather look upD z an on a Tree in all its Luxuriancy and Diffufion of Boughs and Branches, than when it is thus cut and...into a Mathematical Figure; and cannot but fancy that art Orchard in Flower looks infinitely more delightful, than, all the little Labyrinths of the more...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1767
...We fee the marks of the, fciflars upon every plant and bum. I do not know whe-. ther I am fingular in my opinion, but for my own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffufion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure ;...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1778
...fcifiars upon every plant and bufh. I do not know whether I am fmgular in my opinion, but for rr.y own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffufion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure ;...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - English language - 1793
...srcing along -with nature, was to have been uied. " I do not know whether I am fmgular in my " opinion j but, for my own part, I would rather ^' look upon a tree, in all its luxuriancy and diftu" fion of boughs and branches, than when it is *' thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure...
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which the Common Improprieties in Reading and ...

John Walker - Rhetoric - 1801 - 392 pages
...scene of imagery, and awakens numberless ideas that before slept in the imagination. Sped. N 417. I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion,...diffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure. Ib. N 415. Correct reading would admit of a pause in...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 2

Hugh Blair - English language - 1801 - 370 pages
...following, ov going along with nature , was to have been ufed. " I do not know whether I am fmgular in "my opinion, but, for my own part, I would "rather look upon a tree, in all its luxuriancy " and diffufion of boughs and branches , than . " when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathe" matical figure;...
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Select British Classics, Volume 16

English literature - 1803
...trees rise in cones,_globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars upon every plant or bush. I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion,...would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy anddiffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure;...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - English language - 1807
...beautiful. It carriestall the characteristics of our Author's natural, graceful, and flowing language. A tree, in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, is a remarkably happy expression. The Author seems to become luxuriant in describing an object which...
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The Spectator, Volume 138

1927
...trees rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars upon every plant and bush. I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion, but, for *<ny own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches,...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volume 4

Joseph Addison - 1811
...trees rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars upon every plant and bush. I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion,...its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, thafi when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure; and cannot but fancy that an orchard...
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