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For March a faithless smile discloses.
If thou wouldst bloom securely here
Let Phoebus first oertake the steer:

Thou'rt like the seaman, who reposes

On one fair day—one favouring wind, Weighs anchor, and the future braves: But sighs, when on the ocean waves,

For that calm port he leaves behind, .. ,

As with an anxious ere he sees
His shattered hull and shivered sail
Borne at the mercy of the gale,

Wherever winds and waters please;

And deems, as he is sinking fast,
The sands and brine and foam beneath,
That every wave contains a death,

That every plunge will be his last.

Thou'rt like the courtier, who, elate
When greeted first by favour's ray,
Begins to make a grand display :—

But, ah! it is a fickle state.

A court is like a garden-shade;
The courtiers and the flowers that rise
Too suddenly 'neath changeful skies,

Oft sink into the dust and fade.

In short, we all are like thy flower,

And ever, both in weal and woe,

With strange perverseness we bestow Our thoughts on time's swift-fleeting hour. And 'tis the same with those who pine,

And deem that grief will never flee,

And those who, bred in luxury, Think the gay sun will always shine; For every joy brings sorrow tooi

And even grief may herald mirth 5'

And God has mingled life on earth
With bitterness and honey-dew.
Thus winter follows summer's bloom,

And verdant summer winter's blight;

Thus reign by turns the day and night;—
Change is the universal doom.
Then floweret! when thy charms have fled,

All withered by a fate unkind,

Call wisdom's proverb to thy mind—
Soon green, soon gray,soon ripe, soon dead.

Bowring.

ON HEARING THAT

THE AUSTRIANS HAD ENTERED NAPLES.

Aye—down to the dust with them, slaves as they are—
From this hour, let the blood in their dastardly veins,
That shrunk at the first touch of Liberty's war,
Be sucked out by tyrants, or stagnate in chains I

On, on, like a cloud, through their beautiful vales,

Ye locusts of tyranny, blasting them o'er—

Fill, fill up their wide sunny waters, ye sails,

From each slave-mart of Europe, and poison their shore—

May their fate be a mock-word—may men of all lands
Laugh out, with a scorn that shall ring to the poles,
When each sword, that the cowards let fall from their hands,
Shall be forged into fetters to enter their souls!

And deep, and more deep, as the iron is driven,
Base slaves! may the whet of their agony be
To think—as the damned haply think of that heaven
They had once in their reach—that they might have been
free!

Shame, shame—when there was not a bosom, whose hent,

Ever rose o'er the zero of 's heart,

That did not, like echo, your war-hymn repeat,
And send all its prayers with your Liberty's start—

When the world stood in hope—when a spirit, that breathed
Full fresh of the olden time, whispered about,
And the swords of all Italy, half-way unsheathed,
But waited one conquering cry to flash out!—

When around you, the shades of your mighty in fame,
Filicajas and Petrarchs seemed bursting to view,
And their words and their warnings—like tongues of

bright flame,
Over Freedom's apostles—fell kindling on you!

Good God! that, in such a proud moment of life,
Worth ages of history—when, had you but hurled
One bolt at your bloody invader, that strife
Between freemen and tyrants that spread through the
world—

That then—O disgrace upon manhood—e'en then,
You should falter—should cling to your pitiful breath,
Cower down into beasts, when you might have stood men,
And prefer the slave's life of damnation to death!

It is strange—it is dreadful!—Shout, Tyranny, shout
Through your dungeons and palaces, 'Freedom is o'er'—
If their lingers one spark of her light, tread it out,
And return to your empire of darkness once more.

For, if such are the braggarts that claim to be free,
Come, Despot of Russia, thy feet let me kiss—
Far nobler to live the brute bond-man of thee,
Than to sully e'en chains by a struggle like this.

Anon.

INVITATION TO THE YOUNG.

Ye hearts with youthful vigour warm,

In smiling crowds draw near,
And turn from every mortal charm,

A Saviour's voice to hear.

He, Lord of all the worlds on high,

Stoops to converse with you;
And lays his radiant glories by,

Your friendship to pursue.

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