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$109,267 $ 66,531 $ 284,815 47,860 29,281

119,084 51,021 2,500,000 568,899 348,307 2,000,000 5,943,678 1,147,104 500,000 1,500,000 115,917 50,972

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3,378,132 945,508 508,625

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1,500,000 296,500 153,600 4,500,000 934,124 477,655

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1,000,000 114,498 44,898 1,330,960 173,542 76,079

Miles
State.
Name.

in

Length. Va. Clover Hill,

114 Manassa Gap (M. Gap to Franklin),

38 Appomattox (City Point to Petersburg), 10 South Side (Petersburg to Lynchburg), open

122 Virginia & Tenn.(Lynch. to Knoxville),open 106 Seaboard & Roanoke (Portsmouth to Weldon) 80

Greenesville & Roanoke(Hicksford toGaston) 21 N. C. Gaston and Raleigh,

97 Wilmington and Weldon,

162 Wilmington and Manchester, S.C.,.

171 S.C. South Carolina (Charleston to Augusta, Ga.), 136

Columbia Branch (Branchville to Columbia), 68
Camden Br. (from Col. Br. road to Camden), 37
Charlotte &S. Carolina (Col. to Charlotte, Va.) 109
King's Mountain (S.Carol, R. to Yorkville), 22
Greenville and Columbia, .

143
Abbeville Branch, .

12 Anderson Branch,

10 S Ga. Central (Savannah to Macon),

192 Milledgeville and Gordon,

17 Waynesboro' and Augusta,

51 Macon and Western (Macon to Atlanta), 101 Georgia (Augusta to Atlanta),

171
Athens Branch,

40
Branch (Camak to Warrenton),
West. &Atl'c (Atlanta to Chattanooga, Ten.) 140
Rome (to Kingston on the West. & Aul. R.), 20
E. Tenn. & Ga. (Dalton to Knoxville), open 82
Southwestern (Macon to Columbus),

99
Muscogee (Columbus to Butler on S. W.R.), 50
Lagrange (Atlanta to West Point),

87 Ala. Montgomery and West Point,

88 Selma and Tennessee (Selma to Ġunter's Landing), now open

55 Mobile and'Ohio (open to Citronelle),

33 Tuscumbia and Decatur,

46 Fa. Tallahassee and St. Marks,

26 Miss. Vicksburg, Jackson, and Brandon,

60 Raymond,

7 La. Clinton and Port Hudson,

24
Mexican Gulf (N. Orleans to Proctorsville), 27
West Feliciana (Bayou Sara to Woodville), 26
Pontchartrain (N. Orleans to Lake Pontch.),
Carrollton (New Orleans to Carrollton),

New Orleans, Opelousas, and G. West, open 60 Tenn. Nashville and Chattanooga (28 miles by steamboat on Tennessee River),

151 Shelbyville Branch,

16 East Tennessee & Georgia. (See Georgia.) Memphis and Charleston, open to Lagrange,

50 Ky: Lexington and Frankfort,

29 Louisville and Frankfort,

65 Covington and Lexington,

96 Ohio, Ohio and Pennsylvania. (See Pennsylvania.)

Little Miami (Cincinnati to Springfield), 84
Columbus and Xenia,

55
Mad River and Lake Erie,

129 Findlay Branch (from Carey),

16 Dayton and Springfield,

24 Sandusky, Mansfield, and Newark, .

116 Iron (fronton to Centre Station),

13
Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati,

135
Cleveland and Pillsburg (open to Wellsville), 100
Hanover Branch,
Akron Branch to Hudson,

14
Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton,

60 Dayton and Greenville (to Union),

40 Dayton & Western (open to Ind. State line), 40 Central Ohio (Zanesville to Columbus),

59 Hillsboro' and Cincinnati,

37

130,000

3,150,000 106,732 97,882

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Miles

Gross Expen State. Name.

in Cost. Receipts ses Length

1852-3. 1852-3. Ohio, Cleveland, Zanesville, and Cincinnati,

61 Cincinnati, Wilmington, and Zanesville,

77 Columbus, Piqua, and Indiana,

102 Hamilton, Eaton, and Richmond,

45 Scioto and Hocking Valley,

20 Toledo, Norwalk, and Cleveland,

87

$ 1,351,714 Cleveland and Erie,

95 Ind. Madison, Indianapolis, and Peru,

159 2,400,000 $516,414 $248,319 Lafayette and Indianapolis,

64 Jeffersonville (to Edinburgh),

77 1,111,970 Shelbyville Branch,

16 Shelbyville and Knightstown,

27 Rushville and Shelbyville,

20 New Albany and Salem, open

136 5,000,000 Crawfordsville and Wabash,

26

105,914 Terre Haute & Richmond (to Indianapolis),

73 1,263,019

71,446
Indianapolis & Bellefontaine(open to Union), 81
Bellefontaine and Indiana (Galion to Union), 123 1,966,682
Lawrenceburg and Upper Mississippi, open 894
Evansv. & Crawfordsv. (open to TerreHaute),

108
Martinsville and Franklin,

25 Northern Indiana. See Southern Michigan. Ill. Galena & Chicago Union (open to Freeport),

145

2,500,000 472,109 187,396 St. Charles Branch,

8 Aurora Branch,

13 Chicago and Rock Island,

182 4,500,000 Chicago and Mississippi,

195 Great Western, Long Point to Naples,

82 Illinois Central (Chicago to Mobile), open

115 6,000,000 Mich. Central (Detroit to Chicago),

278

8,856.834 1,145.537 566,721 Southern Mich.& N. Ind. (Monroe to Chicago), 247

6,000,000 1,100,000 770,000 Erie and Kalamazoo (Adrian and Toledo),

33 Tecumseh Branch,

10 Detroit and Pontiac,

25 Wisc. Milwaukee & Mississippi, open

100 2,000,000
Rock River Valley
Union,

15
Total out of New England and New York, 9,8134
Total in the United States,

17,1461

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XXVI. PUBLIC LANDS. The public lands belonging to the General Government are situated, 1st. Within the limits of the United States, as defined by the treaty of 1783, and are embraced by the States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and that part of Minnesota east of the Mississippi River, all of which have been formed out of the Northwestern Territory, as conveyed with certain reservations to the United States by New York in 1781, by Virginia in 1784, by Massachusetts in 1785, and by Connecticut in 1786; also the lands within the boundaries of the States of Mississippi and Alabama north of 31° north latitude, as conveyed to the United States by Georgia in 1802. 2d. Within the Territories of Orleans and Louisiana, as acquired from France by the treaty of 1803, including the portion of the States of Alabama and Mississippi south of 31°; the whole of Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, and that portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; the Indian Territory; the district called Nebraska; the Territory of Oregon, and the region lying between Oregon and Minnesota, north of 42° and south of 490 north latitude. 3d. Within the State of Florida, as obtained from Spain by the treaty of 1819. 4th. In New Mexico and California, as acquired from Mexico by the treaty of 1848.

Within the limits recognized by these treaties and cessions, the public lands covered an estimated area of 1,584,000,000 acres. In this is not included any territory acquired from Mexico by the treaty of 1853. Exclu

sive of the lands in Oregon, California, New Mexico, Utah, the Indian and Nebraska Territories, the entire area of the public domain is stated, after a careful examination, to have been 471,892,439 acres. Up to June 30, 1853, $ 142,283,478 had accrued from sales of land to thai date. The aggregate outlay of every kind upon these lands to the same date, including cost of purchase, of surveying, and of selling, was $ 88,994,013, leav. ing as net profit to the government $ 53,289,465, or an annual average of nearly a million of dollars for the last fifty years. If there should be added to this, at the rate of $ 1.25 per acre, the value of the land granted for bounties, schools, internal improvements, &c., it would amount to more than double the above sum. There yet remain of the surveyed lands 96,940,709 acres, worth (net, after deducting cost of selling) $ 116,018,641, and of the unsurveyed lands 137,635,629 acres, worth (net) $ 161,873,263. Total, $ 277,891,904. The average cost per acre to the government of acquiring title, &c. to the lands is 14.41 cents; of survey, 2.07 cents; of selling and managing, 5.32 cents; in all 21.80 cents; while it receives $ 1.25 per acre, or a net profit on each acre sold of $ 1.032.

The following table shows the sales of public lands and the proceeds thereof from the year 1833 to 1853, inclusive. The sales, however, by no means show the amount of public lands disposed of during the year; for there were during the year ending June 30, 1853, located with military bounty land warrants and other certificates, 6,151,787 acres, donated for railroads, 1,427,457 acres, and selected by the States as swamp lands, 16,684,253 acres. Full details of the present condition of the public lands, and of the various grants and donations thereof for purposes of education and of internal improvement, are given in the American Almanac for 1850, pp. 180 et seq.

The Secretary of the Interior states “ that the principle of granting alternate sections, and selling those reserved at double ihe ordinary price, has been found by experience to be most salutary." Quantity of Public Land sold, and the Amount paid for it, in each Year,

from 1833 to 1853, inclusive. Years. Acres. Dollars. Years. Acres.

Dollars. 1833

3,856,227.56 4,972,284.84 1844 1,754,763.13 2,207,678.04 1834 4,658,218.71 6,099,981.04 1845 1,843,527.05 2,470,303.17 1835 12,564,478.85 15,999,804.11 1846 2,263,730.81 2,904,637.27 1836 20,074,870.92 25,167,833.06 1847 2,521,305.59 3,296,404.08 1837 5,601,103.12 7,007,523.04 1848 1,887,553.04 2,621,615.26 1838 3,414,907.42 4,305,564.64 1849 1,329,902.77 1,756,890.42 1839 4,976,382.87 6,464,556.79 1850* 769,364.48 998,841.26 1840

2,236,889.74 2,789,637.53 18517 1,846,847.49 2,390,947.45 1841 1,164,796.11 1,463,364.06 18521 1,553,071.00 1,975,658.54 1842 1,129,217.58 1,417,972.06 18531 1,083,495.21 1,804,653.24 1843 1,605,264.06 2,016,044.30|| Total, 178,135,917.45 100,212,193.20

The following table shows the number of land-warrants issued under the acts of 1847, 1850, and 1852; the number located; and the number now outstanding

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Number

Number

Acres. located.

Outstand'g

Acres. 79,286 | 12,040,760 6.311

838,520 116,523 8,376,600 55,034 3,615.720 3,236

189,160 5.602 323,ASO 199,095 20,606.520 66,947 4,778,120

† For year ending June 30th.

* From January 1st to June 30th.

XXVII. BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES. The following abstract of the condition of the State Banks throughout the Union is taken from a letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, dated May 6, 1854, which is printed as House Document No. 102. The information was obtained in compliance with a resolution of the House adopted as long since as July 10, 1832. The following statement of the method of preparing the tables is taken from the Letter."

“ In all the tables prepared in the Treasury Department, the following general rules have been observed :

“1. The net amount of the capital of the banks has been given whenever it could be ascertained. So, whenever a bank appears to have bought shares of its own stock, that amount has been deducted from its gross capital. Bank stock thus bought in stands on the same footing as bank stock not paid in.

“2. The capital is placed first, and next to it loans and discounts, stocks, real estate, and other investments,' to show at one view the whole investments of each bank supposed to yield income, and the ratio these investments bear to the capital paid in.

“3. The next four columns, ósums due by other banks, notes of other banks on hand, specie funds, and specie,' comprise all the immediate means of the banks.

“4. The next three columns, circulation, deposits, and sums due to other banks, comprise all the immediate liabilities of the banks.

“Under the head of deposits' are included dividends unpaid,' and all other sums due on demand, as far as could be ascertained.

“5. The four columns, circulation, deposits, sums due to other banks, and other liabilities,' include all the liabilities of the banks, excepting what is due to their own stockholders for capital paid in, and profits acquired.

“6. From these general tables the items 'profit and loss, surplus and contingent funds,' &c., &c., are excluded; partly because they are, as Mr. Gallatin observes, merely balancing accounts, and partly because they cannot be conveniently introduced on a sheet of the size of that on which the public documents are printed.”

In the following statements are included, it is believed, all the incorporated banks that were in operation in the beginning of 1851 and the beginning of 1854, a few scattering ones excepted, and these consisting chiefly of banks that had but lately commenced business.

In the State of Texas there is one bank doing a small business, from which no returns have been received.

In the States of California, Florida, Arkansas, and Iowa, and in the Territories of New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and Minnesota, there are no incorporated banks.

In the returns from some of the banks of Pennsylvania, and those of some other States, a considerable amount of specie is believed to be embraced under the head of “specie fund,” but the exact amount cannot be ascertained.

No.

paid in.

1. Comparative View of the Condition of the Banks in the different Slates in

1850-51, und 1853 - 54.

No.

of Capital Loans and
Date.
State.

of
Bran-

Discounts.

Stocks. B’ks.

ches. Maine, Oct., 1850 32

$3,248,000 $5,830,230 Jan., 1854

60

5,913,870 11,166,519 New Hampshire, Dec., 1850 22 2,375,900 3,821,120

Dec., 1853 35 3,376,000 6,518,188 Vermont, Aug., 1850 | 27 2,197,240 4,423,719 $ 40,500 Aug, 1853 | 33 2,914,040

6,840,932 117,125 Massachusetts, Sept., 1850 126

36,925,050 63,330,024 Sept., 1853 137

43,270,500 | 77,172,079 Rhode Island, Sept., 1850 63

11,645,492 15,492,547

151,277 Sept., 1853 77

15,917,429 22,844,911 121,414 Connecticut, April, 1850 41 2 9,907,503 15,607,315

April, 1853 53 2 13,164,594 24,601,165 644,962 New York, Sept., 1850 197

1 48,618,762 107,132,38913,177,944
Feb., 1854 312 1 79,018,980 203,008,077 21,453,585
New Jersey,
Jan., 1851 26

3,754,900 7,158,977
Jan., 1854 38
5,147,741 10,663,627

974,895 Pennsylvania, Nov., 1850 53 5 17,926,222 39,430,145 1,428,354

Nov., 1853 61 5 19,768,864 48,656,884 1,141,649 Delaware, Jan., 1851 6 3 | 1,293,185 2,264,313 52,986 Jan., 1854 6

3 1,343,185 2,915,602 62,681 Maryland, Jan., 1851 23 28,123,881 14,900,816 760,417 Jan., 1854 | 25

9,558,409 18,358,441 825,339 Virginia, Oct., 1850 6 31 9,824,545 | 19,646,777 269,914

Jan., 1854 16 North Carolina, Nov., 1850

39 12,796,466 24,913,789 2,259,812 5 13 3,789,250

6,056,726 150,000 Dec., 1853

9

16 4,818,565 10,366,247 64,175 South Carolina, Jan., 1851 12 2 13,213,031 23,312,330 963,611 Mar., 1854 16

2 16,073,580 24,365,690 2,775,059 Georgia,

Dec., 1850 11 10 13,482,198 11,421,626 1,574,349

Dec., 1853 7 12,957,600 13,567,469 2,193,848 Alabama, Jan., 1851 2 1,800,580 4,670,458 70,361 Jan., 1854 3

2,100,000 5,865,142 471,156 Louisiana, Jan., 1851 5

20 12,370,390 19,309,108 Jan., 1854 9

842,000

10 17,359,261 29,320,582 Mississippi, April, 1851 1

118,460 112,275 Jan., 1854 1

240,165 362,585 Tennessee, Jan., 1851 19 6,881,568 10,992,139 432,902

Oct., 1853 9 19 6,599,872 11,846.879 538,042 Kentucky, Jan., 1851 5 21 7,536,927 12,536,305 694,962

Jan, 1854 9 26 10,869,665 21,398,386 802,124 Missouri,

Jan., 1851 1 5 1,209,131 3,533,463

Jan., 1854 5 1,215,405 3,958,055 Illinois,

Jan., 1851

No ne. None. None. None. April, 1853 23

1,702,456 586,404 1,780,617| Indiana,

Nov., 1850 1 13 | 2,082,950 4,395,099

Dec., 1853 31 135,554,552 7,247,366 3,257,064 Ohio,

Nov., 1850 57 8,718,366 17,059,593 2,200,891

Feb., 1854 68 8,013,154 17,380,255 2,808,337 Michigan, Jan., 1851 5 1 764,022 1,319,305

420,521 Jan., 1854 6

1 | 1,084,718 2,199,093 637,725 Wisconsin, Jan., 1851

None. None. None. Jan., 1854 10

600,000 1,163,066 578,721

No ne.

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