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THE

ANNUAL REGISTER

18 20.

GENERAL INDEX.

THE Proprietors of the ANNUAL REGISTER , respectfully announce that a GENERAL Index to this work is prepared, and will be committed to the press immediately. It will comprise a period of sixty-two years, from 1758 to 1819 inclusive, during which time the Annual Register, begun by the late Mr. Dodsley, has upheld its reputation, and received the unvarying support of the public.

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As the object of the publishers in preparing an Index to

this very voluminous work is not profit, but to render complete sets more useful to their possessors, it is intended that the price to Subscribers shall be as low as possible, and that the Impression shall very little exceed the number which may be subscribed for. Subscribers will therefore be pleased to give in their names as early as possible to their respective booksellers, as the lists will be closed on the first of August.

It is presumed that the Subscribers to DODSLEY'S ANNUAL REGISTER will be pleased with the plan, now first adopted, of giving a copious İndex in each volume ; which, though it may add to the size, will not enhance the price of future volumes.

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PRINTED FOR BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY;
OTRIDGE AND RACKHAM; J. CUTHELL; LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME,
AND BROWN; E JEFFERY AND SON; LACKINGTON AND CO.; J. BELL;
SHER WOON), NEELY, AND JONES; R. SAUNDERS; W. REYNOLDS; AND
SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL.

1822.

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IN giving to the world a volume of DodSLEY's AnnuaỊ Register, which has to set out with recording the commencement of a new reign, we naturally look back on the great political changes of the long series of years over which we have already passed. We began our career at a very interesting epoch. The popular administration of the elder Pitt; the exploits of Frederick the Great; the expulsion of the French from America; the acquisition of a vast empire in India-afforded us the materials of our early volumes. The events which succeeded, though less dazzling to the imagination, were scarcely less interesting to the subjects of a free government the çabals and contentions of parties at home, and the plans of internal administration adopted by the different countries of Europe. Then came the struggle between Great Britain and her colonies, and the various vicissitudes of war and negotiation, which led ultimately to the establishment of a free, independent, prosperous nation, on the other side of the Atlantic, English in everything except in their refusal of obedience to English authorities; and, by this very circumstance of apparent difference, proving more surely their genuine British descent. Scarcely was peace restored to the world, when the contest between popular factions and the old government of France began to attract notice ; a series of changes of administration and of system ended in the annihilation of the monarchy; all the horrors of the Revolution followed ; and a military despotism sprung up, which, under the successive names of Directory, Consul, and finally of Emperor, oppressed France herself, swallowed up Holland and the minor states of Italy, subverted the Germanic empire and the Papal dominions, seated upstarts on the thrones of

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