Songs from Books

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Doubleday, Page, 1912 - Children's poetry, English - 247 pages
Preface: I have collected in this volume practically all the verses and chapter-headings scattered through my books, with the exception of the Jungle Books and the Just So Stoires. In several cases where only a few lines of verse were originally used I have given in full the song, etc., from which they were taken.

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Page 119 - If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too...
Page 120 - And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!
Page 48 - You forget our mirth, and talk at the tables, The kine in the shed and the horse in the stables To pitch her sides and go over her cables! Then you drive out where the storm-clouds swallow: And the sound of your oar-blades falling hollow Is all we have left through the months to follow. Ah, what is a Woman that you forsake her, And the hearth-fire and the home-acre, To go with the old grey Widow-maker?
Page 80 - T"*HE Stranger within my gate, He may be true or kind, But he does not talk my talk — I cannot feel his mind. I see the face and the eyes and the mouth, But not the soul behind. The men of my own stock They may do ill or well, But they tell the lies I am wonted to, They are used to the lies I tell. And we do not need interpreters When we go to buy and sell.
Page 213 - Five and twenty ponies Trotting through the dark Brandy for the Parson, 'Baccy for the Clerk; Laces for a lady, letters for a spy, Watch the wall, my darling, while the Gentlemen go by!
Page 32 - Gold is for the mistress — silver for the maid — Copper for the craftsman cunning at his trade. " "Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall, "But Iron — Cold Iron — is master of them all.
Page 119 - em up with worn-out tools; If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss: If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is...
Page 23 - But — we have been out in the woods all night A-conjuring Summer in! And we bring you news by word of mouth — Good news for cattle and corn — Now is the Sun come up from the South, With Oak, and Ash, and Thorn!
Page 120 - If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: " Hold on! " If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with Kings — nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much: If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds...

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