The History of the United States of America, Volume 5

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Contents

Jeffersons Hatred of the New England Clergy
459
Progress and Effects of religious Enthusiasm
465
Republican Dissensions Politics of New York
466
Other Proceedings of Congress
473
Instructions to Livingston and Monroe 479 1
479
Cession by the Indians of Southern Illinois
482
Close of the Commission under Jays Treaty
488
Opinions as to the Acquisition of Louisiana
494
Revival of the Slave Trade by South Carolina
500
Amendment of the Constitution proposed
506
Impeachment of Addison in that State
512
Freedom of the Press in New York
518
He forces a Quarrel on Hamilton
520
His Character
526
Politics of Connecticut
532
Jeffersons Plan of Seaboard Defense Gunboats
538
Duane the public Printing
544
Vote of the electoral Colleges Jeffersons inaugural Speech
548
New York School Fund
550
Gubernatorial Election
556
Relations with Tunis
562
Contest for Speaker John Randolph
566
Debate thereon Bill passed
570
Political Grounds of the New England Church Establish
573
Smiths Project
574
Death of Pierce Jeffersons disproportionate Views
580
Failure of the Expedition
586
Affairs of Pennsylvania Prosecutions for Libel
591
BURRS MYSTERIOUS ENTERPRISE AFFAIRS OF KEN
594
Return to Philadelphia
600
Wilkinsons Determination
607
Excitement in Kentucky
614
Tylers Flotilla
619
Second Session of the Ninth Congress Habeas Corpus
625
Provisions of the Act
639
Judicial Appointments
645
Gunboat Appropriation defeated
651
The Treaty as agreed to
657
Reasons given for that Rejection
662
Proceedings against Burr
668
The Driver Sloop of War
674
Measures taken in consequence
681

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Page 189 - I will never send another minister to France without assurances that he will be received, respected, and honored as the representative of a great, free, powerful, and independent nation.
Page 145 - The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the press ; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity.
Page 418 - Mexican republic, conformably with what is stipulated in the preceding article, shall be incorporated into the union of the United States and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States...
Page 145 - But, to punish (as the law does at present) any dangerous or offensive writings, which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial trial, be adjudged of a pernicious tendency, is necessary for the preservation of peace and good order, of government and religion, the only solid foundations of civil liberty.
Page 38 - Such is the amiable and interesting system of government (and such are some of the abuses to which it may be exposed) which the people of America have exhibited to the admiration and anxiety of the wise and virtuous of all nations, for eight years, under the administration of a citizen, who, by a long course of great actions, regulated by prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude, conducting a people inspired with the same virtues, and animated with the same ardent patriotism and love of liberty,...
Page 39 - If a preference, upon principle, of a free republican government, formed upon long and serious reflection, after a diligent and impartial inquiry after truth ; if an attachment to the Constitution of the United States, and a conscientious determination to support it, until it shall be altered by the...
Page 242 - States are parties, as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact; as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact; and that, in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the States, who are parties thereto, have the right and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities,...
Page 239 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Page 197 - ... to bring them, or either of them, into contempt or disrepute ; or to excite against them, or either or any of them, the hatred of the good people of the United States...
Page 278 - Government is the exclusive judge of the extent of the powers delegated to it, stop nothing [short] of despotism — since the discretion of those who administer the government, and not the Constitution, would be the measure of their powers: That the several states who"' -'formed that instrument being sovereign and independent, have the unquestionable right to judge of the infraction; and, That a Nullification by those sovereignties, of all unauthorized acts done under color of that instrument is...

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