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somewhere or give them to someone, maybe Betty. And he sort of said I think he responded, 'I don't know or 'Let me think about that.' And left that topic.” Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, p. 152, H. Doc. 105–311, p. 872; See also 7/27/98 OIC Interview of Monica Lewinsky, p. 7, H. Doc. 105–311, p. 1395. Ms. Lewinsky also testified that both she and the President had a specific concern about the hat pin being on the list; "I mentioned that I had been concerned about the hat pin being on the subpoena and he said that had sort of concerned him also.” Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, p. 152, H. Doc. 105–311, p. 872; see also 7/27/98 OIC Interview of Monica Lewinsky, p. 7, H. Doc. 105–311, p. 1395.

President Clinton provided the following explanation to the grand jury and this Committee regarding this conversation: “Ms. Lewinsky said something to me like, "what if they ask me about the gifts you've given me," but I do not know whether that conversation occurred on December 28, 1997, or earlier. Whenever this conversation occurred, I testified, I told her 'that if they asked her for gifts, she'd have to give them whatever she had. * * *'I simply was not concerned about the fact that I had given her gifts. Indeed, I gave her additional gifts on December 28, 1997. I also told the grand jury that I do not recall Ms. Lewinsky telling me that the subpoena specifically called for a hat pin that I had given her.” Request for Admission number 24; see also Grand Jury Testimony of President Clinton, 8/17/98, H. Doc. 105-311, p. 495-98.

Ms. Lewinsky testified that she was never under the impression from anything the President said that she should turn over to Ms. Jones's attorneys all the gifts that he had given her. Deposition of Monica Lewinsky, 8/26/98, p. 58, H. Doc. 105–311, p. 1337.

Additionally, she said she can't answer why the President would give her more gifts on the 28th when he knew she was under an obligation to produce gifts in response to a subpoena. She did testify, however, that, “to me it was never a question in my mind and I—from everything he said to me, I never questioned him, that we were never going to do anything but keep this private, so that meant deny it and that meant do-take whatever appropriate steps needed to be taken, you know, for that to happen. *** So by turning over these gifts, it would at least prompt (the Jones attorneys] to question me about what kind of friendship I had with the Presi

Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, pp. 166–67, H. Doc. 105–311, pp. 886–87.

After this meeting on the morning of December 28th, Ms. Currie called Monica Lewinsky and made arrangements to pick up gifts the President had given to Ms. Lewinsky. Monica Lewinsky testified under oath before the grand jury that a few hours after meeting with the President on December 28, 1997, a meeting in which Ms. Lewinsky and President Clinton discussed the fact that gifts given to her by Mr. Clinton had been subpoenaed in the case of Jones v. Clinton, Betty Currie called her. The record indicates the following discussion occurred:

Q. What did (Betty Currie] say?

A. She said, “I understand you have something to give me.” Or, “The President said you have something to give me.” Along those lines. * * *

dent *

Q. When she said something along the lines of "I understand you have something to give me,” or “The President says you have something for me,” what did you understand her to mean?

A. The gifts. Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, pp. 154–55, H. Doc. 105–311, pp. 874.

Later in the day on December 28, Ms. Currie drove to Ms. Lewinsky's home and Ms. Lewinsky gave her a sealed box that contained several gifts Ms. Lewinsky had received from the President, including the hat pin. Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, pp. 156–58, H. Doc. 105–311, pp. 875–78. Ms. Currie testified that she understood the box contained gifts from the President. She took the box home and put it under her bed. Grand Jury Testimony of Betty Currie, 5/6/98, pp. 107–8, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 581. In Monica Lewinsky's February 1, 1998 handwritten statement to the OIC, which Ms. Lewinsky has testified is truthful, she stated, "Ms. Currie called Ms. L later that afternoon and said that the Pres. had told her Ms. L wanted her to hold onto something for her. Ms. L boxed up most of the gifts she had received and gave them to Ms. Currie.” 2/1/98 Handwritten Proffer of Monica Lewinsky, p. 7, H. Doc. 105-311, p. 715.

Betty Currie testified that she did not recall the President telling her that Ms. Lewinsky wanted her to retrieve and hold some items; that Ms. Lewinsky called her and asked her to come get the gifts. Grand Jury Testimony of Betty Currie, 5/6/98, pp. 105–6, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 581. When asked if a contrary statement by Ms. Lewinsky-indicating that Ms. Currie had in fact spoken to the President about the gift transfer—would be false, Ms. Currie replied: "She may remember better than I. I don't remember.” Grand Jury Testimony of Betty Currie, 5/6/98, p. 126, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 584.

Further evidence before the Committee reveals that Betty Currie telephoned Monica Lewinsky regarding the gifts, and not the other way around:

Mr. Schippers: When Ms. Currie, when they wanted to get rid of the gifts, Ms. Currie went and picked them up, put them under her bed to keep them from anybody else. Another mission accomplished?

Mr. Starr: That's right.

Mr. Schippers: By the way, there has been some talk
here that Monica said that she recalled that Betty Currie
called her and said, either the President wants me to pick
something up, or I understand you have something for me
to pick up. Later, Ms. Currie backed off that and said,
well, I am not sure, maybe Monica called me. In the mate-
rial that you made available, you and your staff made
available to us, there were 302s in which Monica said, I
think when Betty called me, she was using her cell phone.
Do you recall that, Judge Starr?

Mr. Starr: I do.
Mr. Schippers: And in that same material that is in your
office that both parties were able to review and that we

did, in fact, review, there are phone records of Ms. Currie;
are there not?

Mr. Starr: There are.
Mr. Schippers: And there is a telephone call on her cell
phone to Monica Lewinsky's home on the afternoon of De-
cember 28, 1997; isn't there?

Mr. Starr: That is correct.

Mr. Schippers: Once again, Monica is right and she has been corroborated, right?

Mr. Starr: That certainly tends to corroborate Ms.

Lewinsky's recollection. Impeachment Hearing on Inquiry Pursuant to H. Res. 581, Thursday, November 19, 1998, Transcript pp. 407–409.

President Clinton testified before the grand jury, and reiterated to this Committee (Request for Admission Number 26) that he did not recall any conversation with Ms. Currie on or about December 28, 1997, about gifts previously given to Ms. Lewinsky and that he never told Ms. Currie to take possession of gifts he had given Ms. Lewinsky. Grand Jury Testimony of President Clinton, 8/17/98, p. 50, H. Doc. 105–311, p. 502; see also Id. at 113–114, H. Doc. 105– 311 at 565-66. The Committee believes this answer is false because the evidence reveals that Betty Currie did call Monica Lewinsky about the gifts and there is no reason for her to do so unless instructed by the President. Because she did not personally know of the gift issue, there is no other way Ms. Currie could have known to call Ms. Lewinsky about the gifts unless the President told her to do so. The President had a motive to conceal the gifts because both he and Ms. Lewinsky were concerned that the gifts might raise questions about their relationship. By confirming that the gifts would not be produced, the President ensured that these questions would not arise. The concealment and non-production of the gifts to the attorneys for Paula Jones, allowed the President to provide false and misleading statements about the gifts at his deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton. Additionally, Ms. Lewinsky's testimony on this subject has been consistent and unequivocal; she recited the same facts in February, July and August. 4. The Committee concluded that beginning on or about December

7, 1997, and continuing through and including January 14, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton intensified and succeeded in an effort to secure job assistance to a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him in order to corruptly prevent the truthful testimony of that witness in that proceeding at a time when the truthful testimony of that witness would have

been harmful to him Beginning on or about December 7, 1997, and continuing through and including January 14, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton intensified and succeeded in an effort to secure job assistance to a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him in order to corruptly prevent the truthful testimony of that witness in that proceeding at a time when the truthful testimony of that witness would have been harmful to him.

Although Monica Lewinsky discussed jobs in New York with the President in October, interviewed with Bill Richardson in October and met with Vernon Jordan regarding her move to New York on November 5, 1997, the effort to obtain a job for Monica Lewinsky in New York intensified after the President learned, on December 6, 1997, that Monica Lewinsky was listed on the witness list for the case of Jones v. Clinton.

On December 7, 1997, President Clinton met with Vernon Jordan at the White House. Ms. Lewinsky met with Mr. Jordan on December 11 to discuss specific job contacts in New York. Jordan then made calls to certain New York companies on Ms. Lewinsky's behalf. Jordan telephoned President Clinton to keep him informed of the efforts to get Ms. Lewinsky a job. Grand Jury Testimony of Vernon Jordan, 3/3/98, pp. 64-66, H. Doc. 105–316, pp. 1710-11.

On December 11, Judge Wright ordered President Clinton to answer interrogatories, including whether he has engaged in sexual relations with any government employees. On December 16, the President's attorneys received a request for production of documents that mentioned Monica Lewinsky by name. On December 18 and 23, Monica Lewinsky interviewed with New York based companies that had been contacted by Vernon Jordan. On December 19, Monica Lewinsky was served with a deposition subpoena in the case of Jones v. Clinton. On December 22, Vernon Jordan took Monica Lewinsky to see her new attorney, Frank Carter, who had been recommended by Vernon Jordan. During the car ride to Mr. Carter's office, Monica Lewinsky and Vernon Jordan discussed the subpoena, the case of Jones v. Clinton, and her job search. Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, p. 138–42, H. Doc. 105-311, pp. 997–98; see also Grand Jury Testimony of Vernon Jordan, 3/3/98, p.183–85, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 1730.

On December 28, 1997, the President had a discussion with Monica Lewinsky at the White House in which they discussed Monica Lewinsky's involvement in the case of Jones v. Clinton and her plan to move to New York. Ms. Lewinsky recalled that President Clinton suggested to her that she move to New York soon because by moving to New York, the lawyers representing Paula Jones in the case of Jones v. Clinton may not contact her. The following statement was recorded by an OIC investigator after interviewing Monica Lewinsky

"On December 28, 1997, Lewinsky visited the President at the White House *** the President said that if Lewinsky was in New York the Jones lawyers might not call; that the sooner Lewinsky moved the better; and that maybe the lawyers would ignore her." 7/27/98 OIC Interview of Monica Lewinsky, p. 7, H. Doc. 105–311,

p. 1395.

The President stated to the Committee he did not suggest that Monica Lewinsky could avoid testifying in the Jones v. Clinton case by moving to New York. See Request for Admission number 23.

On January 5, Monica Lewinsky had a telephone conversation with the President in which they discussed the signing of an affidavit in the case of Jones v. Clinton. Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, pp. 191–98, H. Doc 105–311, pp. 1010–12. On January 7, 1998, Monica Lewinsky signed an affidavit to be filed in the case of Jones v. Clinton in which she denied having a sexual relationship with President Clinton. On or about January 7, 1998, the President had a discussion with Vernon Jordan in which Mr.

Jordan mentioned that he was assisting Monica Lewinsky in finding a job in New York. Mr. Jordan made the following statement before the grand jury: "I'm sure I said, 'I'm still working on her job [in New York).” To which Jordan quotes the President as responding, “Good.” Grand Jury Testimony of_Vernon Jordan, 5/5/98, p. 225–26, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 1828–29. President Clinton cknowledges that he was aware that Mr. Jordan was assisting Ms. Lewinsky in her job search in connection with her move to New York. See Request for Admission number 31.

On January 8, 1998, Monica Lewinsky interviewed in New York with MacAndrews and Forbes, a company recommended by Vernon Jordan. Ms . Lewinsky informed Mr. Jordan that the interview did not go well, so he called the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer at MacAndrews and Forbes. Ms. Lewinsky was given a second interview with MacAndrews and Forbes on the morning of January 9, 1998, and she was given an informal job offer that she informally accepted on the afternoon of January 9th. Ms. Lewinsky conveyed the news of the job offer to Vernon Jordan. Grand Jury Testimony of Monica Lewinsky, 8/6/98, pp. 206-210, H. Doc. 105–311, pp. 1014–15; Grand Jury Testimony of Vernon Jordan, 5/5/98, p. 229–31, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 1829. On or about January 9, 1998, the President received a message from Vernon Jordan indicating that Monica Lewinsky had received a job offer in New York. Sometime shortly thereafter, Vernon Jordan had a conversation with the President, during which Vernon Jordan testified that he told the President, “Monica Lewinsky's going to work for Revlon and his response was thank you very much.” Grand Jury Testimony of Vernon Jordan, 5/28/98, p. 59, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 1903. The President acknowledges that he was informed that Monica Lewinsky had received a job offer in New York, but cannot recall who told him or when he first learned of the job offer. See Request for Admission number 37.

On January 13, 1998, Monica Lewinsky received a formalized job offer from Revlon (a MacAndrews and Forbes company) and was asked to provide references. The evidence shows that President Clinton, after learning of Monica Lewinsky's New York job offer, asked Erskine Bowles if he would ask John Hilley to give Ms. Lewinsky a job recommendation. Mr. Bowles testified that the President told him that “[Monica Lewinsky) had found a job in the private sector, and that she had listed John Hilley as a reference, and could we see if he could recommend her, if asked." Grand Jury Testimony of Erskine Bowles, 4/2/98, p. 78, H. Doc. 105–316, p. 238.

It is logical to infer from this chain of events that the efforts of the President and others at the President's direction to obtain a job in New York for Monica Lewinsky were motivated to influence the testimony of a potential witness in the case of Jones v. Clinton, if not to prevent her testimony outright. The job search for Monica Lewinsky was intensified in late 1997, when it became likely that Monica Lewinsky would be asked to provide testimony in the case of Jones v. Clinton and her truthful testimony would be harmful to the President.

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