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1700. The confirmation of peace, and additional 15 July, articles, between Great Britain and Algiers. Pap. Off. U. 22.

1703. The treaty of peace and commerce be10 July^ tween Great Britain and Algiers.

28 Oct. Pap. Off. U. 23—24.

170*. The confirmation of the treaty dated the 26 Feb. 8th of April, 1702.

Pap. Off. U. 25.

1716. The treaty of peace and commerce be- 29 Oct. tween Great Britain and Algiers. Pap. Off U. 27.

1751. An additional article of peace. 3 June. Pap. Off U. 31.

Treat. 1785, vol, iii. p. 29.

1762. The treaty of peace and commerce be14 May., tween Great Britain and Algiers. Pap. Off. U. 34.

-{The following is printed from the treaty which was printed by authority, in 1662.]

Articles of Peace between bis Sacred Majesty Charles the Second, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, &c. and the City and Kingdom of Algier, and the Territories thereof; concluded by Sir John Lawson, Knight,the 2yil)ay of April, 1662.

Imprimis. THAT from this day and for ever forwards, there be a good and firm peace between his Sacred Majesty the King of Great Britain, &c. and the Bassa, Duan, and the governors of Algier, and the dominions thereto belonging; and the ships, subjects, and people tjf either party shall not do nor offer any offence or

injury injury to each other, but treat one another with all possible respect and friendship; and any ships belonging to the King of Great Britain, or any of his subjects, may freely come to the port of Algier, and buy and sell as in former times, and also unto any other port that belongs to the government of Algier, paying the custom of ten per cent, as in former times; and no man, within the jurisdiction of Algier, shall give the subjects of his said Majesty a bad word, or a bad deed, or a bad action.

II. That all ships, as well thofe belonging to his Sacred Majesty the King of Great Britain, &c. and any of his Majesty's subjects, as those belonging to Algier, shall freely pass the seas, and traffic, without any search, hinderance, or molestation whatsoever.

III. That all subjects of the King of Great Britain, &c. now slaves in Algier, or any of the territories thereof, be set at liberty and delivered, upon paying the price they were first sold for in the market; and that, for the time to come, no subject of his said Majesty be bought or sold, or made slaves of, in Algier or its territories.

IV. That if any ship of Tunis, Tripoli, or Salley, or any other, do bring any ships, men, or goods, belonging to any of the subjects of his Majesty of Great Britain, into Algier, or any of the ports thereunto belonging, the governors there shall not permit them to be sold in the said territories.

V. That any merchants of the subjects of the King of Great Britain, &c. dying in Algier or its territories, his goods or monies shall not be seized by the Bassa, Aga, or any other minister, but remain with the English, consul.

VI. That the English consul that lives in Algier be allowed a place to pray in, and no man to do him, or any of his said Majesty's subjects, any wrong or injury, in word or deed, whatsoever.

VII. That . *

VII. That in case any of his Majesty's subjects should happen to strike a Turk or a Moor, if he be taken, let him be punished; but it" he escape, nothing shall be said to the English consul, nor to any other of his said Majesty's subjects, upon that account.

VIII. That if any ships of war of his said Majesty shall come into Algier, or other the ports of that government, with any prize, they may fell and dispofe of it at their own pleasure, without being molested by any, and that they be not obliged to pay customs in any fort; and if the said ships of war shall want provision, victuals, or any other thing, they may freely buy it at the rate in the market.

IX. That any ships belonging to the subjects of his Majesty the King of Great Britain, Sec. coming into Algier, or any of the ports in its territories, shall, for such goods as they sell, pay the dues according to custom; and the goods they sell not, they shall freely carry on board, without paying any duties for the -fame.

X. That no shipwreck belonging to his said Majesty,. or any of his subjects, on the coast belonging to Algier, shall become prize; and that neither the goods be forseited, nor the men made slaves, but that the people of Algier shall do their best endeavour to save them and their goods.

XI. That the consul, or any other subjects of his said Majesty, be not bound to pay the debts of any other Englishman, or subject of his said Majesty, unless he become surety.

XII. That no subject of his said Majesty the King of Great Britain, &c. in matter of difference, shall be liable to any other judgment but that of the Duan.

XIII. That the subjects of his said Majesty, in difference amongst themselves, shall be subject to no other determination but that of the consul.

XIV. That

XIV. That no merchant, nor other subject of his said Majesty, being a passenger in or unto any port, Iball be molested or meddled with. And for the better practising the second article, according to the true intent and meaning thereof, it is agreed that the Algier ships of war, meeting any merchant ship belonging to the subjects of the King of Great Britain, &c. not being in any of the seas appertaining to his Majesty's dominions, have the liberty to fend one single boat, with but two fitters more than the common crew of rowers, and no more to enter on board the said merchant ships but the two sitters, without the express leave of the commander of the said merchant ship: that upon producing unto them a pass, under the hand and seal of the lord high admiral of England, the said boat do presendy depart, and the merchant ship to proceed on his voyage. And although the commander of the merchant ship produce no pass from the lord high admiral of England, yet, if the major part of the ship's company be subjects to the King of Great Britain, &c. the said boat shall presently depart, and the merchants ship proceed freely. And any ships of war of his Majesty the King of Great Britain, &c. meeting with any ship of Algier, if the commander shall produce a pass firmed by the chief governor of Algier, and the major part of the ship's company be Turks, Moors, or slaves, then the Algier ship to proceed freely.

That presendy after the signing and sealing these articles by the governors or chief authority of the city and kingdom of Algier, all injuries and damages sustained on either part shall be quite taken away and forgotten, and this peace shall be in full force and virtue; and for all damages and depredations that shall be afterwards done or committed.hy-ekherside, before notice can be given of this-peace, there shall be full satissaction made, and whatsoever remains in kind be restored.

That if any grievances happen on either side, it

shall

shall not be lawful to break the peace till satisfaction he denied.

At the court at Hampton Court, the
25th of June, 1662.

It was ordered by his Majesty in council, that the ensuing clause be imprinted together with the articles aforesaid.

His Majesty, out of his princely and tender care, having, since the conclusion of this treaty, recommended the redemption of all slaves, his subjects, in Algiers, unto the lords bishops of this kingdom; their lordships have (in this truly Christian and pious design) proceeded with such alacrity and expedition, that, for the effecting thereof, ten thousand pounds are already prepared to be transmitted into thofe parts for redemption of all captives, according to the tenor of these articles, at the rate they were first fold in the market.

[The following is printed from the treaty which was published by authority, in 1686.]

Articles of Peace and Commerce between the most Serene and Mighty Prince Charles the Second, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith, &c. and the most Illustrious Lords, the Bajhaw, Dey, Aga, and Governors of the famous City and Kingdom of Algiers, in Barbary: Concluded by Arthur Herbert, Esquire, Admiral of his Majesty's Fleet in the Mediterranean Seas, on the Tenth Day of April, Old Stile, 1682.

I. IN the first place, it is agreed and concluded, that from this day, and for ever forwards, there be a true, firm, and inviolable peace, between the most Serene King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland,

Defender

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