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The 'Treaty of Peace, Union, Friendship, and mutual Defence, between the Crowns of Great Britain, France, and Spain, concluded at Seville on the $th ^'November, N. S. 1729.

In the Name of the most Holy Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, three distinct Persons, and one only true God.

THEIR most Serene Majesties the King of Great Britain, the most Christian King, and the Catholic King, desiring, with equal earnestness, not only to renew and bind more clofely their ancient friendship, but likewise to remove whatever might hereafter disturb it, to the end that being united in sentiments and inclination, they may for the future act in every thing as having but one and the same view and interest; and for this purpofe, the most Serene King of Great Britain having given full pewer for treating in his name to M. William Stanhope, vice-chamberlain of his Britannic Majesty's houshold, one of his privy-council, member of the parliament of Great Britain, colonel of a regiment of dragoons, and his said Majesty's ambassador extraordinary to his Catholic Majesty; as also to M. Benjamin Keene, his said Britannic Majesty's minister plenipotentiary to his Catholic Majesty: the most Serene most Christian King having given full power for treating in his name to the Marquis de Brancas, lieutenant-general of his armies, knight of his orders, and of that of the Golden Fleece, his lieutenant-general in the government of Provence, and his ambassador extraordinary to his Catholic Majesty: and the most Serene Catholic King having likewise given full power for treating in his name to M. John Baptist D'Orendayn Marquis de la Paz, his counsellor of state and first secretary of state and of the dispatches; and to M. Jofeph Patino, commander of Alcuesca in the Order of St. James, governor of the council of the treasury, and of the tribunals depending thereon, suprrintendant general of the general revenues, nues, and his secretary of state and of the dispatches for affairs of the marine, the Indies, and the treasury: the above-mentioned ministers have agreed between them on the following articles.

I. There shall be from this time and for ever a solid peace, a strict union, and a sincere and constant friendship, between the most Serene King of Great Britain, the most Serene most Christian King, and the most Serene King of Spain, their heirs and successors, as also between their kingdoms and subjects, for the mutual assistance and defence of their dominions and interests; there shall likewise be an oblivion of all that is past; and all the former treaties and conventions of peace, of friendship, and of commerce, concluded between the contracting Powers respectively, shall be, as they hereby are, effectually renewed and confirmed, in all thole points which are not derogated from by the present treaty, in as sull and ample a manner as if the said treaties were here inserted word for word, their said Majesties promising not to do any thing, nor suffer any thing to be done, that may be contrary thereto, directly or indirectly.

II. In consequence of which treaties, and in order to establish firmly this union and correspondence, their Britannic, most Christian, and Catholic Majesties promise and engage, by the present defensive treaty of alliance, to guaranty reciprocally their kingdoms, states, and dominions under their obedience, in what parts of the world soever situate, as also the rights and privileges of their commerce, the whole according to the treaties; so that the said Powers, or any one of them, being attacked or molested by any Power, and under any pretext whatever, they promise and oblige themselves reciprocally to employ their offices, as soon as they shall be thereto required, for obtaining satissaction to the party injured, and for hindering the continuance of hostilities; and if it happen that the said offices be not sufficient for procuring satissaction without delay, their said Majesties promise ro furnish the following succours, jointly or separately, that is to say, his Britannic Majesty, eight thousand foot and four thousand horse; his most Christian Majesty, eight thousand foot and four thousand horse; and his Catholic Majesty, eight thousand foot and four thousand horse: if the party attacked, instead of troops, should demand ships of war or transports, or even subsidies in money, he shall be free to choofe, and the other parties shall furnish the said ships or money, in proportion to the expence of troops; and, for taking away all doubt touching the valuation of the succours, their abovesaid Majesties agree, that a thousand foot shall be computed at ten thousand florins Dutch money, and a thousand horse at thirty thousand florins Dutch money, by the month -, and the same proportion shall be observed with respect to the ships that ought to be furnished; their said Majesties promising to continue and keep up the said succours as long as the trouble shall subsist; and in case it should be found necessary, their said Majesties shall mutually succour each other with all their forces, and shall even declare war against the aggressor.

III. The ministers of his Britannic Majesty and of his most Christian Majesty, having alledged that in the treaties concluded at Vienna between the Emperor and the King of Spain, in the year one thousand seven hundred twenty-five, there were divers clauses that infringed the articles of the several treaties of commerce, or of the treaties of peace in which commerce may be concerned, antecedent to the year one thousand seven hundred twenty-five; his Catholic Majesty has declared, as he declares by the present article, that he never meant to grant, nor will suffer to subsist by virtue of the said treaties of Vienna, any privilege contrary to the treaties here above confirmed.

IV. It having been agreed by the preliminary articles, that the commerce of the English and French nations, as well in Europe as in the Indies, should be reestablished established on the soot of the treaties and conventions antecedent to the year one thousand seven hundred twenty-five, and particularly that the commerce of the English nation in America should be exercised as heretofore; it is agreed by the present article, that all necessary orders shall be dispatched on both sides, without any delay, if they have not been sent already, as well for the execution of the said treaties of commerce, as for supplying what may be wanting for the entire re-establishment of commerce on the foot of the said treaties and conventions,

V. Although it was stipulated by the preliminaries that all hostilities should cease on both sides, and that if any trouble or hostilities should happen between the subjects of the contracting Powers, either in Europe, or in the Indies, the contracting powers should concur for the reparation of damages sustained by their respective subjects; and notwithstanding this it is alledged, that on the part of the subjects of his Catholic Majesty acts of disturbance and hostilities have been continued; it is agreed by this present article, that as to what relates to Europe, his Catholic Majesty shall forthwith cause reparation to be made for the damages which have been suffered there since the time prescribed by the preliminaries for the cessation of hostilities; and as to what relates to America, he will likewise forthwith cause reparation to be made for the damages which shall have been suffered there since the arrival of his orders at Cartagena on the J4 day of June one thousand seven hundred twenty-eight. And his said Catholic Majesty shall publish the most rigorous prohibitions for preventing the like violences on the part of his subjects; their Britannic and most Christian Majesties promising on their part, if there be like cases, to cause reparation to be made for what shall have been so done, and to give like orders for the preservation of the peace, tranquillity, and good intelligence.

VI. Commissaries shall be nominated, with sufficient

powers, powers, on the part of their Britannic and Catholic Majesties, who shall assemble at the court of Spain within the space of four months aster the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty, or sooner if it can be done, to examine and decide what concerns the ships and effects taken at sea on either side to the times specified in the preceding article. The said commissaries shall likewise examine, and decide, according to the treaties, the respective pretensions which relate to the abuses that are suppofed to have been committed in commerce, as well in the Indies as in Europe, and all the-other respective pretensions in America, sounded on treaties, whether with respect to the limits or otherwise. The said commissaries shall likewise discuss and decide the pretensions which his Catholic Majesty may have, by virtue of the treaty of one thousand seven hundred twenty-one, for the restitution of the ships taken by the English sleet in the year one thousand seven hundred eighteen. And the said commissaries, aster having examined, discussed, and decided the abovesaid points and pretensions, shall make a report of their proceedings to their Britannic and Catholic Majesties, who promise that within the space of six months aster the making of the said report, they will cause to be executed punctually and exactly what shall have been so decided by the said commissaries.

VII. Commissaries shall likewise be nominated on the part of his most Christian Majesty, and of his Catholic Majesty, who shall examine all grievances generally whatsoever, which the said parties therein interested may form respectively, whether for the restitution of vessels seized or taken, or with respect to commerce, limits, or otherwise.

VIII. The said commissaries shall finish punctually their commission within the space of three years, or sooner if it can be done, to be computed from the day of the signing of the present treaty, and this without

any

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