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I think we should read with Hanmer :

Free from all faults, as from faults seeming free.

I wish we were all as good as we appear to be; a sentiment very naturally prompted by his reflection on the behaviour of Angelo. Hanmer has only transposed a word to produce a convenient sense.

STEEVENS.
The first and second folio have
Free from our faults,

MALONE. 331. His neck will come to your waist, a cord, sér.] That is, his neck will be tied, like your waist, with a rope. The friars of the Franciscan order, perhaps of all others, wear a hempen cord for a girdle. Thus Buchaunan:

Fac gemant suis,
Variata terga funibus."

JOHNSON. 337. Pygmalion's images, newly made woman -] By Pygmalion's images, newly made woman, I believe Shakspere meant no more than-Have you no women now to recommend to your customers, as fresh and untouched as Pygmalion's statue was, at the moment when it became flesh and blood ? The passage may, however, contain some allusion to a pamphlet printed in 1598, called — The Metamorphosis of Pygmalion's Image, and certain Satires. I have never seen it, but it is mentioned by Ames, p. 568; and whatever its subject might be, we learn from an order signed by the archbishop of Canterbury and the bishop of London, that this book was commanded to be burnt.

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The order is inserted at the end of the second volume of the entries belonging to the Stationers-Company.

STEVENS. Is there none of Pygmalion's images newly made woman, to be had now?" If Marston's Metamorphosis of Pygmalion's Image be alluded to, I believe it must be in the argument.--" The maide (by the power of Venus) was metamorphosed into a living woman."

FARMER. There may, however, be an allusion to a passage in Lilly's Woman in the Moone, 1597. The inhabitants of Utopia petition Nature for females, that they may, like other beings, propagate their species. Nature grants their request, and “ they draw the curtins from before Nature's shop, where stands an image clad, and some unclad, and they bring forth the cloathed image," &c.

TEEVENS. By Pygmalion's images newly made women, I do not understand, with Mr. Steevens, virgins as fresh as if they came recently from the hands of Pygmalion. I rather think the meaning is: Is there no courtezan, whọ being newly made woman, [i. e. lately debauched,] still retains the appearance of chastity, and looks as cold as a statue, to be had ? &c.

The following passage in Blurt Master Constable, & comedy, by Middleton, 1602, seems to authorize this interpretation : " Laz. Are all these women?

lmp. No, no, they are half men and half women.

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" Laz. You apprehend too fast. I mean by wo. men, wives; for wives are no maids, nor are maids women.Mulier, in Latin, had precisely the same meaning.

MALONE. 340. --what say'st thou to this tune, matter, and method? Is't not drown'd i' the last rain?] Lucio asks Pompey, whether his answer was not drown'd in the last rain ? but Pompey returns no answer to any of his questions: or, perhaps, he means to compare Pom. pey's miserable appearance to a drown'd mouse. So, in King Henry VI. Part I. " Or piteous they will look, like drowned mice."

STEEVENS. 341. what say'st thou, trot? -] So, in Wily Beguiled, 1613: “ Thou toothless old trot thou." Again, in the Wise Woman of Hogsden, 1638: “ What can this witch, this wizard, or old trot?"!

STEEVENS. Trot, or as it is now often pronounced, honest irout, is a familiar address to a man among the provincial vulgar.

JOHNSON. 342. -Which is the way?

--] What is the mode

Johnson. 349. in the tub.] The method of cure for venereal complaints is grossly called the powdering tub.

JOHNSON. It was so called from the method of cure. See the notes on " the tub- fast and the diet---in Timon, act iv.

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-say I sent thee thither.

--] Shakspere seems here to allude to the words used by Gloster in Henry VI. Part III. act v. sc. 6. “ Down, down to hell ; and sayI sent thee thi

ther." -go; say I sent thee thither. For debt, Pompey? or how?] It should be pointed thus, Go, say I sent thee thither for debt, Pompey; or how--i. e. to hide the ignominy of thy case, say, I sent thee to prison for debt, or whatever other pretence thou fanciest better. The other humorously replies, For being a bawd, for being a bawd, i.e. the true cause is the most honour. able. This is in character.

WARBURTON. I do not perceive any necessity for the alteration. Lucio first offers him the use of his name to hide the seeming ignominy of his case; and then very natu. rally desires to be informed of the true reason why he was ordered into confinement.

STEEVENS. 367. -it is not the wear.] 1. e, it is not the fashion.

Steevens, 376. Then, Pompey ? nor now.] I think there, should not be a note of interrogation here. The meaning is : I will neither bail thee then, nor now. So again in this play,

More, nor less to others paying.” MALONE... 379. Go.--to kennel, Pompey,-go:] It should be remembered, that Pompey is the common name of a, dog, to which allusion is made in the mention of a

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395. It is too general a vice,] Yes, replies Lucio, the vice is of great kindred; it is well ally'd, &c. As much as to say, Yes, truly, it is general; for the greatest men have it as well as we little folks. A little lower he taxes the duke personally with it.

EDWARDS. 408. and he is a motion ungenerative, that's infallible. ] A motion generative means a puppet of the masculine gender; a thing that appears to have those powers of which it is not in reality possessed.

STEEVENS. much detected for women ; appears so like the language of Dogberry, that at first I thought the passage corrupt, and wished to read suspected. But perhaps detected had anciently the same meaning. So in an old collection of tales, entitled, Wits, Fits, and Fancies, 1595: ~ -- An officer whose daughter was detected of dishonestie, and generally so reported."- That detected is there used for suspečled, and not in the present sense of the word, appears, I think, from the words that followmand generally so reported, which seem to relate not to a known but sus

MALONE. In Rich's Adventures of Simonides, 1584, 4to. “ all Rome, deteEled of inconstancie." HENDERSON

-clach-dish:] The beggars, two or three centuries ago, used to proclaim their want by a wooden dish with a moveable cover, which they clacked to shew that their vessel was empty. This

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