The works of ... Henry St. John, lord viscount Bolingbroke. With the life of lord Bolingbroke by dr. Goldsmith, now enlarged, Volume 1

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 405 - God loves from whole to parts : but human soul Must rise from individual to the whole. Self-love but serves the virtuous mind to wake, As the small pebble stirs the peaceful lake ; The centre mov'd, a circle straight succeeds, Another still, and still another spreads ; Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace ; His country next, and next all human race ; Wide and more wide, th...
Page 340 - ... them in parliament, purely because they are employed and trusted by the prince. Your lordship sees, not only how much a due reflection upon the experience of other ages and countries would have pointed out national corruption, as the natural and necessary consequence of investing the crown with the management of so great a revenue; but also the loss of liberty, as the natural and necessary consequence of national corruption.
Page 7 - ... and honour, than a minister who should conduct the administration with great ability and success, and should at the same time procure and abet, or even connive at, such indirect violations of the rules of the constitution as tend to the destruction of it, or even at such evasions as tend to render it useless.
Page 461 - And Philip the fourth was obliged, at last, to conclude a peace, on terms repugnant to his inclination, to that of his people, to the interest of Spain, and to that of all Europe, in the Pyrenean treaty.
Page 157 - By constitution we mean, whenever we speak with propriety and exactness, that assemblage of laws, institutions, and customs, derived from certain fixed principles of reason, directed to certain fixed objects of public good, that compose the general system, according to which the community hath agreed to be governed.
Page 38 - The power and majesty of the people, an original contract, the authority and independency of parliament, liberty, resistance, exclusion, abdication, deposition; these were ideas associated, at that time, to the idea of a w'hig, and supposed by every whig to be incommuaioable and inconsistent with the idea of a tory. Divine, hereditary, indefeasible right, lineal succession, passive obedience, prerogative, nonresistance, slavery, nay, and sometimes popery too...
Page 428 - But there have been lawyers that were orators, philosophers, historians: there have been Bacons and Clarendons. There will be none such any more, till in some better age true ambition, or the love of fame, prevails over avarice; and till men find leisure and encouragement to prepare themselves for the exercise of this profession, by climbing up to the vantage ground...
Page 315 - I approve therefore very much the devotion of a studious man at Christ-Church, who was overheard in his oratory entering into a detail with God, as devout...
Page 440 - Sixtus the fourth was, if I mistake not, a great collector of books at least.
Page 411 - Excudent alii spirantia mollius aera, Credo equidem, vivos ducent de marmore vultus, Orabunt causas melius, caelique meatus Describent radio et surgentia sidera dicent; Tu regere imperio populos, Romane, memento : Hae tibi erunt artes, pacisque imponere morem, Parcere subiectis, et debellare superbos.

Bibliographic information