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BOOKS ON CHEMISTKY,

PUBLISHED BY MR. VAN VOORST.

THE ELEMENTS OF HEAT AND OF NON-METALLIC CHEMISTRY. Especially designed for Candidates for the Matriculation Pass Examination of the University of London. By Frederick Guthrie, B.A. (Lond.), Ph.D., F.R.S.E., F.C.S., Late Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Royal College, Mauritius. Post 8vo, 7*.

HANDBOOK OF CHEMICAL MANIPULATION. By C. Grevtlle Williams. Fully Illustrated. Post 8vo, 15s.

INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY. By John Attfield, Ph.D.,. F.C.S., Professor of Practical Chemistry to the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Post 8vo, 10s. Gd.

LECTURE NOTES FOR CHEMICAL STUDENTS, embracing both Mineral and Organic Chemistry. By E. Frankland, F.R.S., Professor of Chemistry in the Royal Institution of Great Britain, and in the Government School of Mines. Post 8vo, 12s.

MANUAL OF CHEMICAL QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. By A. B. Northcote, F.C.S., and Arthur H. Church, F.C.S. Post 8vo, 10s. Qd.

THE LABORATORY GUIDE FOR STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. By A. H. Church, M. A, Professor of Chemistry, Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester. Post 8vo, 4s. Gd.

A MANUAL OF INORGANIC CHEMlSTRY, arranged to facilitate the Experimental Demonstration of the Facts and Principles of the Science. By Charles W. Eliot, Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Metallurgy, and Frank II. Storer, Professor of General and Industrial Chemistry, in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. First English Edition. Post 8vo, 10s. Gd.

THE MECHANICAL THEORY OF HEAT, with its applications to the Steam-engine and to the Physical Properties of Bodies. By R. Clausius, Professor of Physics in the University of Zurich. Edited by T. Archer Hirst, F.R.S., Professor of Mathematics in University College, London. 8vo, 15s.

THE JOURNAL OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY. Is. monthly.

Other Books for Students.

ELEMENTARY COURSE OF GEOLOGY, MINERALOGY, AND PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. By Professor Ansted, M.A. &c. Post 8vo. Second Edition, 12s.

MANUAL OF THE MINERALOGY OF.GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. By Robert Philips Greg, F.G.S., and Wm. G. Lettsom. 8vo, with numerous Woodcuts. 15s.

ELEMENTARY COURSE OF BOTANY: Structural, Physiological, and Systematic. By Professor Henfrey. Post 8vo, 12s. 6d.

MANUAL OF BRITISH BOTANY. By Professor C. C. BaBington, M.A. &c. Sixth Edition. 10s. Qd.

GENERAL OUTLINE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM. By Professor T. Rymer Jones. 8vo. Third Edition. £1 lis. Qd.

-TW ELEMENTARY TEXT-BOOK OF THE MICROSCOPE: including a Description of the Methods of Preparing and Mounting Objects, &c. By J. W. Griffith, M.D., F.L.S. &c. Post 8vo, Is. Qd.

THE FIRST PRINCIPLES OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. By William Tiiynnk Lynn, B.A. Lond., A.K.C., F.R.A.S., of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Fcap. 8vo, price 3s.

"A small and well-wrought book. A person having three books of Euclid, and the commonest algebra, and who wants some insight into the way of applying mathematics to physios, will find here just what he wants."—Alkemrum, Nov. 14,1863.

JOHN VAN VOORST, 1 PATERNOSTER ROW.

THE

ELEMENTS OF HEAT

AND OF

NON-METALLIC CHEMISTRY.

ESPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR CANDIDATES FOR THE

MATRICULATION PASS EXAMINATION OF

THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON.

BY

EREDERICK GUTHRIE,

B.A. (loud.), Ph.d., F.E.S.E., F.C.S.,

LATE PROFESSOR OP CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, ROYAL COLLEGE, MAURITIUS.

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PREFACE.

This little treatise is intended for the use of Candidates for the Matriculation Pass Examination of the University of London. It is believed to contain all (and hut little more than all) that is required for the chemical branch of that examination.

On page ix will be found a list of the subjects in this branch, a knowledge of which is demanded by the University. Attached to each is given the number of page and paragraph where the subject is discussed. It will be seen that the order of the subjects required for the examination has been adhered to as strictly as possible.

There is in each Chapter about sufficient material for a lesson. Those to whom the subject is entirely new and who have not the advantage of receiving oral instruction, should not attempt to understand everything on the first reading. They should read the book carefully, but rapidly, once or twice, so as to gain a general idea of the nature of the subject. After being laid aside for a time, the book should be taken up again and studied so as not to leave a single point in obscurity.

The considerable changes which have recently been introduced into the views regarding the composition of many bodies, have received careful consideration. The combining weights or equivalents of the elements here given are those almost universally

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