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nel Lindsey to order Captain Buffington and his command to that place, to enable the Judge of the Superior Court to execute the laws of Georgia, he was not aware there existed any necessity for his services, or that of his command ; that Georgia was abundantly able to execute her own laws; and that so far as that duty devolved upon him, on that occasion he expected to have no difficulty in doing it,” without his assistance. In less than thirty minutes after the receipt of the communication the soldiers' tents were struck, and Captain Buffington and his command were on their march to their quarters in Tennessee. Several of the Anti-Bishop party implored the judge not to send the soldiers away; the women cried, and said they would all be killed, the court could not be held, &c.

When the time arrived for opening the court, the Sheriff was reluctant to go to the court-house, saying that he was certain he would be killed before the trials were over. The judge assured him that he should be protected-took him by the arm, walked to the court house, opened court, and during the term tried Bishop and other im portant criminal causes, growing out of the Murray difficulties, without the least disturbance. Judge Warner's conduct on this occasion was the theme of admiration.

Of the legal qualifications of this gentleman it is scarcely necessary to speak, as the evidences of their high order have been already exhibited in the positions to which he has been so repeatedly elevated. The characteristic feature of his mind is its remarkable logical force. His efforts at the bar and his decisions on the bench alike disclose this feature. His style is free from ornament, and with an unusual directness, he approaches and discusses the question controlling every case-not one redundant word, not one of repetition, and yet complete. His language, with perfect accuracy, conveys precisely the idea intended.

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MONROE COUNTY.

Laid out by the Lottery Act of 1821, and a part set off to Butts, 1825, and named after James Monroe, President of the United States. Length, 21 m.; breadth, 16 m. ; area square miles, 336.

The Ocmulgee forms the eastern boundary. The Towaliga empties into the Ocmulgee. There are several creeks, viz., Tobesofkee, Crooked, Shoal, &c.

Extract from the Census of 1850.-Dwellings, 1,194 ; families, 1,194 ; white males, 3,472 ; white females, 3,338; free coloured males, 2; free coloured females, 3. Total free population, 6,815 ; slaves, 10,170. Deaths, 210. Farms, 746; manufacturing establishments, 2. Value of real estate, $2,580,103; value of personal estate, $5,684,909.

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The soil is various, combining the best and the worst. The lands on the water-courses are rich, dark, chocolate soil, well timbered, and admirably adapted to the cultivation of cotton. The mulatto and gray lands are tolerably productive.

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Forsyth is the county town, situated on a ridge dividing the waters of Rum and Tobesofkee creeks, 50 miles W. N. W. of Milledgeville.

At this place is located the Forsyth Female Collegiate Institute. The wealthy and intelligent citizens of Forsyth, and Monroe County generally, having felt for some years the inconvenience and impolicy of sending their daughters far from home to obtain a suitable education, determined to change their course, and throw themselves upon their own resources.

Accordingly, the citizens of the county and village determined to establish a female school of high order. An act, incorporating a college seminary at Forsyth, passed the State Legislature in 1849, which was at once carried into effect by the friends of the enterprise. The brick building known as the Monroe Railroad Bank, owned by the Masonic Fraternity, was repaired, and enlarged with a third story, at a cost of several thousand dollars, so as to accommodate a school

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The Board of Trustees chose the Rev. E. J. C. Thomas Principal during the year 1850. He was succeeded by the Rev. William C. Wilkes, who entered upon his duties with a determination to elevate the institution to a rank equal to any in the South. He well knew the difficulties to be encountered ; but with prudence, energy, and a full board of efficient assistants, the College was soon placed in a position to secure confidence and command extensive patronage. The annual increase of pupils has been over twenty-five per cent.

In two years, under its present organization, the increase of pupils was so great, and the audiences which attended the commencement occasions were so large, that the Trustees were convinced other and more extensive arrangements should be made to meet the wants of the institution.

The old Southern Botanic College building, a large and imposing edifice in an unfinished condition, was purchased and completed for a sum little less than $10,000, and is now an ornament to the town, and well suited to the purposes contemplated.

The principal and nearly all his assistants reside in the College. Connected with it are a good library, a well-selected chemical, philosophical, and astronomical apparatus, and a mineralogical cabinet, with some of the rarest and finest specimens.

Culloden is a quiet and pleasant village, 32 miles west of Macon. It was selected by gentlemen of wealth having large families to educate, on account of its healthiness. It is named after Mr. William Culloden, one of the first settlers of the county. At this place there has been for several years an excellent seminary for young ladies.

Gulletsville, or New Market, is twelve miles north of Forsyth.
Russellville is eight miles northeast of Culloden.
Prattsville is nine miles from Forsyth.

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· On the Towaliga River are the falls known as the Towaliga Falls. In the “Illustrations of Georgia," by William C. Richards, Esq., they are thus described :-" The pleasing impressions first received were continually enhanced by successive and varied views, which may be obtained at will. Indeed, so fine is the view afforded from many points, that it is difficult to decide which is the most attractive; and passing from rock to rock, the beholder is ever delighted with new features. This variety is the greatest charm of the scene. The river above the falls is about three hundred feet wide, flowing swiftly over a rocky shoal. At its first descent it is divided by a ledge of rock, and forms two precipitous falls for a distance of fifty feet. The falls are much broken by the uneven surface over which the water flows, and on reaching their rocky basin are shivered into foam and spray.”

GEORGIA: EPISCOPAL INSTITUTE.— The Episcopal Church is chiefly indebted to the liberality of G. B. Lamar, Esq., formerly of the city of Savannah, now of the city of New York, for this invaluable seminary. It is located at Montpelier, in this county, about seventeen miles from Macon, fourteen from Forsyth, and six from the Macon and Western Railroad. Its advantages are not surpassed by those of any school in the United States. Until the property was purchased by Mr. Lamar, it was a favourite resort for invalids, who were attracted by its medicinal springs, healthful climate, and delightful tem

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