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tion of nature. Sculptured chasms and fonts, elevated portals, formidable stockades, impregnable fortresses, deep perpendicular cascades, and successive bounding currents, added to the many rainbows that continually shine (when the sun does) through the spray that rises from the falling water, and the variegated colours in front of the rocky banks of red, white, yellow, and brown, and the small rivulets that pour down into the gulf from the mountain's top, give novelty, beauty, sublimity, and awe, to the rapids of Tallulah."

On the 5th of July, 1837, the Rev. Mr. Hawthorn, a minister of the Presbyterian Church, arrived at Clarkesville by the stage. He preached in the evening of that day and on the following Sabbath, and gained the approbation, and almost the admiration, of all who heard him. Those with whom he became partially acquainted during this time, esteemed him very highly as a Christian minister. With others, he went on a visit to the Tallulah Falls. After the party had closed their excursion to the Falls, he and some other gentlemen concluded to go into a beautiful basin of water, between two of the falls, for the purpose of bathing. Some ladies being in company, they waited on them to some distance, leaving Mr. Hawthorn alone at the water, intending to return and bathe with him. They did return, but only found his clothing on the rocks-he was gone, and gone forever.

It is supposed that he went into the water, and, from some circumstance unknown, sunk to rise no more. The strictest search, by a number of gentlemen, was made, but the body was not found.

The Toccoa Falls are on a creek of the same name. The water falls more than one hundred and eighty-five feet perpendicular. No description can give an idea of the beauties of this fall and the surrounding scenery.

“ Among the curiosities of this county is the Chopped Oak, a tree famous in Indian history, and in the traditions of the early settlers. This tree stands about six miles southeast of Clarkesville, and is noted as being the 'Law Ground, or place of holding company musters and magistrates' courts. According to tradition, the Chopped Oak was a celebrated rendezvous of the Indians in their predatory excursions, it being at a point where a number of trails met. Here their plans of warfare were laid, here the several parties separated, and here, on their return, they awaited each other; and then, in their brief language, the result of their enterprise was stated, and for every scalp taken, a gash cut in the tree. If tradition tells the truth, and every scar on the blasted oak counts for a scalp, the success of their scouting parties must have been great. This tree was alive a few years since, when a young man, possessing all the prejudices of his countrymen, and caring less for the traditions of the Indians than his own revenge, killed the tree by girdling it, that it might be no longer a living monument of the cruelties of the savages."

Minerals of almost every kind exist in Habersham. It was in this county that the first gold mines were discovered in Georgia. The following is a list of the principal ones :-Loud's, Gordon's, Lewis's,

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Holt's, Richardson's, White & McGie's, Gordon & Lumsden's, Williams's, Little John's, Horshaw's.

Iron is abundant.

In addition to the minerals already named, the county has cyanite, garnets, carnelians, augite, asbestos, tourmaline, rubies, plumbago. Three diamonds have been found in the county.

Extract from the Census of 1850.-Dwellings, 1,338; families, 1,338; white males, 3,962; white females, 3,713; free coloured males, 2. Total free population, 7,677; slaves, 1,218. Deaths, 17. Farms, 732; manufacturing establishments, 5. Value of real estate, $327,003; value of personal estate, $1,083,771.

Among the early settlers of this county were, General WAFFORD, GABRIEL Fish, Major WILLIAMS, John ROBINSON, ALEXANDER WALDEN, B. CLEAVELAND, JOHN WHITEHEAD, JOHN GRANT, JESSE KINEY, CHARLES RICHE, Mr. VANDEVIER, Hudson Moss, WM. HERRING.

This county was named after one of the Habershams, but which one we cannot say with certainty.

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HALL COUNTY.

Laid out by the Lottery Act of 1818. A part taken from Jackson and Franklin, 1818; part of new territory added to it, 1819. Length, 30 m.; breadth, 24 m.; square miles, 720. Named after Lyman Hall, a signer of the Declaration of American Independence.

The principal streams are, the Chattahoochee, Chestatee, Oconee, and Little rivers. The creeks are numerous.

The soil is productive in some parts; in others poor. GAINESVILLE is the seat of justice, 111 miles from Milledgeville, delightfully situated, with a climate equal to any in the world.

The Sulphur Spring, six miles N, of Gainesville, has been known to the public for several years.

The Limestone Spring, two miles from Gainesville, is much frequented. · Minerals in great variety are found in this county. Among them are gold, lead, ruby, tourmaline, cyanite, and emerald. The elastic sandstone abounds, in which a few diamonds have been found. · Extract from the Census of 1850.--Dwellings, 1,300; families, 1,300 ; white males, 3,639 ; white females, 3,731 ; free coloured males, 4; free coloured females, 3. Total free population, 7,377. Slaves, 1,336. Deaths, 69, Farms, 697. Value of real estate, $609,639; value of personal estate, $867,332.

Among the early settlers were, WM. H. DICKSON, E. DONEGAN,

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JOSEPH WILSON, JOHN BATES, B. REYNOLDS, R. ARMOUR, JOSEPH GAILEY, T. TERRELL, JOHN MILLAR, D. WAFFORD, M. MOORE, W. BLAKE, JOSEPH READ, R. YOUNG, J. McCONNELL, R. WINN, Thos. WILSON, WM. COBB, N. GARRISON, JOSEPH JOHNSON, JOHN BARRETT, E. COWEN, A. THOMPSON, JESSE DOBBS, JAMES ABERCROMBIE, SOLOMON PEAKE.

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HANCOCK COUNTY.

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THIS county was laid out in 1793. A part set off to Baldwin, 1807, and a part to Taliaferro, in 1825. Length, 22 m.; breadth, 20 m.; area square miles, 440. It received its name in honour of John Hancock, whose name appears so conspicuous upon the Declaration of Independence.

The north fork of the Ogeechee River separates the county from Warren, and the Oconee from Putnam.

Hancock is on the dividing ridge between the primitive and secondary, or rather tertiary formations. The northern portion is very hilly, with a red aluminous soil. The southern portion is flat pine woods, with silicious soil. The best lands are on Shoulder Bone and its waters.

SPARTA is the seat of justice, twenty-four miles N. E. of Milledgeville.

Powelton is in the N. E. part.
Mount Zion is seven miles from Sparta.

The climate is mild, but variable. The history of this county furnishes a number of instances of longevity. Dr. TIMOTHY W. RosSITTA died in 1845, aged 92; General HENRY MITCHELL, a soldier of the Revolution, died at 79; Mrs. TABITHA MARCHMAN, at 91 ; Mrs. JUDITH GREENE, at 84; Captain JAMES REESE, 84 ; WM. WYLEY, 84; Mrs. ELISABETH REID, 88.

Among the Revolutionary patriots who died in this county were, John HAMILTON, Esq., áged 78; Mr. Amos BRANTLEY, aged 70; Dr. EDWARD Hood, 71.

HENRY GRAYBILL, Esq., aged 82 years. He was born in Lancaster, (Penn.,) but removed to South Carolina before the Revolutionary War, and afterwards settled in Georgia, where he lived forty-two years. He was a conspicuous and active man during the contest which obtained our Independence, and filled with credit to himself and country the important offices of surveyor, clerk of the court, &c., and was four times elected by the Legislature of this State one of the electors of President and Vice-President. He had been a member of the Baptist Church for fifty years, and of the

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