International Law Situations

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1904 - International law
 

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Page 159 - A convention for the adaptation to maritime warfare of the principles of the Geneva Convention of August 22, 1864.
Page 158 - President of the United States of America, have caused the said Convention to be made public, to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.
Page 152 - To kill or wound treacherously individuals belonging to the hostile nation or army. c. To kill or wound an enemy who, having laid down his arms, or having no longer means of defence, has surrendered at discretion; d.
Page 142 - According to the view of the High Contracting Parties, these provisions, the wording of which has been inspired by the desire to diminish the evils of war...
Page 118 - Military necessity, as understood by modern civilized nations, /consists in the necessity of those measures which are indispensable for securing the ends of the war, and which are lawful according to the modern law and usages of war.
Page 39 - To make improper use of a flag of truce, the national flag, or military ensigns and the enemy's uniform, as well as the distinctive badges of the Geneva Convention; (g.) To destroy or seize the enemy's property, unless such destruction or seizure be imperatively demanded by the necessities of war.
Page 24 - In sieges and bombardments all necessary steps must be taken to spare, as far as possible, buildings dedicated to religion, art, science, or charitable purposes, historic monuments, hospitals, and places where the sick and wounded are collected, provided they are not being used at the time for military purposes.
Page 159 - Reich, the President of the United States of America, His Majesty the King of the Belgians, the President of the French Republic, His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, His Majesty the King...
Page 149 - Prisoners of war shall be subject to the laws, regulations, and orders in force in the army of the State in whose power they are. Any act of insubordination justifies the adoption towards them of such measures of severity as may be considered necessary.
Page 153 - A person can only be considered a spy when, acting clandestinely or on false pretences, he obtains or endeavors to obtain information in the zone of operations of a belligerent, with the intention of communicating it to the hostile party.

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