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make report of the results of such investigation to the Secretary of the Treasury, who shall, from time to time, establish such regulations concerning the exportation and transportation of live stock as the results of said investigations may require.

Sec. 5. That to prevent the exportation from any port of the United States to any port in a foreign country, of live stock affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially pleuro-pneumonia, the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized to take such steps and adopt such measures not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, as he may deem necessary.

Sec. 6. That no railroad company within the United States, or the owners or masters of any steam or sailing or other vessel or boat, shall receive for transportation or transport, from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from the District into any State, any live stock affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuro-pneumonia; nor shall any person, company, or corporation deliver for transportation to any railroad company, or master or owner of any boat or vessel, any live stock, knowing them to be affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease; nor shall any person, company, or corporation drive on foot or transport in private conveyance from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from the District into any State, any live stock, knowing them to be affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuro-pneumonia: Provided, That the so-called splenetic or Texas fever shall not be considered a contagious, infectious, or communicable disease within the meaning of sections four, five, six and seven of this act, as to cattle being transported by rail to market for slaughter, when the same are unloaded only to be fed and watered in lots on the way thereto.

Sec. 7. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Agriculture to notify, in writing, the proper officials or agents of any railroad, steamboat, or other transportation company doing business in or through any infected locality, and by publication in such newspapers as he may select, of the existence of said contagion; and any person or persons operating any such railroad, or master or owner of any boat or vessel, or owner or custodian of or person having control over such cattle or other live stock within such infected district, who shall knowingly violate the provisions of section six of this act, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not less than one hundred nor more than five thousand dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Sec. 8. That whenever any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease affecting domestic animals, and especially the disease known as pleuro-pneumonia, shall be brought into or shall break out in the District of Columbia, it shall be the duty of the Commissioners of said District to take measures to suppress the same promptly and to prevent the same from spreading; and for this purpose the said Commissioners are hereby empowered to order and require that any premises, farm, or farms where such disease exists, or has existed, be put in quarantine; to order all or any animals coming into the District to be detained at any place or places for the purpose of inspection and examination; to prescribe regulations for and to require the destruction of animals affected with contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and for the proper disposition of their hides and carcasses; to prescribe regulations for disinfection, and such other regulations as they may deem necessary to prevent infection or contagion being communicated, and shall report to the Commissioner of Agriculture whatever they may do in pursuance of the provisions of this section.

Sec. 9. That it shall be the duty of the several United States district attorneys to prosecute all violations of this act which shall be brought to their notice or knowledge by any person making the complaint under oath; and the same shall be heard before any district or circuit court of the United States or Territorial court holden within the district in which the violation of this act has been committed.

Sec. 10. That the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, to be immediately available, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated, out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to carry into effect the provisions of

this act.

Sec. 11. That the Commissioner of Agriculture shall report annually to Congress, at the commencement of each session, a list of the names of all persons employed, an itemized statement of all expenditures under this act, and full particulars of the means adopted and carried into effect for the suppression of contagious, infectious, or communicable diseases among domestic animals. (23 Stat. L., 31.)

TRANSFER OF WEATHER BUREAU TO THE DEPARTMENT.

The Weather Bureau was transferred from the War Department to the Department of Agriculture under a law approved October 1, 1890. The principal sections of this law are given here. AN ACT to increase the efficiency and reduce the expenses of the Signal Corps of the Army, and to

transfer the weather service to the Department of Agriculture. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the civilian duties now performed by the Signal Corps of the Army shall hereafter devolve upon a bureau to be known as the Weather Bureau, which, on and after July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, shall be established in and attached to the Department of Agriculture, and the Signal Corps of the Army shall remain a part of the military establishment under the direction of the Secretary of War, and all estimates for its support shall be included with other estimates for the support of the military establishment.

SEC. 3. That the Chief of the Weather Bureau, under the direction of the Secretary of Agriculture, on and after July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, shall have charge of the forecasting of weather, the issue of storm warnings, the display of weather and flood signals for the benefit of agriculture, commerce, and navigation, the gauging and reporting of rivers, the maintenance and operation of sea-coast telegraph lines and the collection and transmission of marine intelligence for the benefit of commerce and navigation, the reporting of temperature and rain-fall conditions for the cotton interests, the display of frost and cold-wave signals, the distribution of meteorological information in the interests of agriculture and commerce, and the taking of such meteorological observations as may be necessary to establish and record the climatic conditions of the United States, or as are essential for the proper execution of the foregoing duties.

SEC. 4. That the Weather Bureau shall hereafter consist of one Chief of Weather Bureau and such civilian employees as Congress may annually provide for and as may be necessary to properly perform the duties devolving on said bureau by law, and the chief of said bureau shall receive an annual compensation of four thousand five hundred dollars, and be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate: Provided, That the Chief Signal Officer of the Army may, in the discretion of the Presiden:, be detailed to take charge of said bureau, and in like manner other officers of the Army, not exceeding four, expert in the duties of the weather service, may be assigned to duty with the Weather Bureau, and while so serving shall receive the pay and allowances to which they are entitled by law.

Sec. 5. That the enlisted force of the Signal Corps, excepting those hereinafter provided for, shall be honorably discharged from the Army on June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and such portion of this entire force, including the civilian employees of the Signal Service, as may be necessary for the proper performance of the duties of the Weather Bureau, shall, if they so elect, be transferred to the Department of Agriculture, and the compensation of the force so transferred shall continue as it shall be in the Signal Service

on June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, until otherwise provided by law: Provided, That skilled observers serving in the Signal Service at said date shall be entitled to preference over other persons not in the Signal Service for appointment in the Weather Bureau to places for which they may be properly qualified until the expiration of the time for which they last enlisted.

Sec. 9. That on and after July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, the appropriations for the support of the Signal Corps of the Army shall be made with those of other staff corps of the Army, and the appropriations for the support of the Weather Bureau shall be made with those of the other bureaus of the Department of Agriculture, and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of Agriculture to prepare future estimates for the Weather Bureau which shall be hereafter specially developed and extended in the interests of agriculture. (26 Stat. L., 653.)

LANDS FOR AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES.

The day following the establishment of the Department the law granting public lands for the establishment of agricultural colleges was approved by President Lincoln. The original bill for this purpose was introduced in the House in 1857 by Hon. Justin S. Morrill. It was passed, but was vetoed by President Buchanan. In December, 1861, Mr. Morrill introduced his bill again, but on May 2, 1862, Senator Wade offered a similar bill in the Senate, and in June it passed both Houses.

The act passed through the efforts of Hon. William Hatch, the Morrill law of 1890, the Adams law of 1906 (p. 67), and this act constitute the largest Government aid to education in the history of this country.

AN ACT donating public lands to the several States and Territories which may provide colleges for

the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That there be granted to the several States, for the purposes hereinafter mentioned, an amount of public land, to be apportioned to each State a quantity equal to thirty thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in Congress to which the States are respectively entitled by the apportionment under the census of eighteen hundred and sixty: Provided, That no mineral lands shall be selected or purchased under the provisions of this act.

Sec. 2. That the land aforesaid, after being surveyed, shall be apportioned to the several States in sections or subdivisions of sections, not less than one-quarter of a section; and whenever there are public lands in a State subject to sale at private entry at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, the quantity to which said State shall be entitled shall be selected from such lands within the limits of such State, and the Secretary of the Interior is hereby directed to issue to each of the States in which there is not the quantity of public lands subject to sale at private entry at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, to which said State may be entitled under the provisions of this act, land scrip to the amount in acres for the deficiency of its distributive share; said scrip to be sold by said States and the proceeds thereof applied to the uses and purposes prescribed in this act, and for no other use or purpose whatsoever: Provided, That in no case shall any State to which land scrip may thus be issued be allowed to locate the same within the limits of any other State, or of any Territory of the United States, but their assignees may thus locate said land scrip upon any of the unappropriated lands of the United States subject to sale at private entry at one dollar and twenty-five cents, or less, per acre: And provided further, That not

PLATE II.

Bul. 3. Division of Publications, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture.

SENATOR JUSTIN S. MORRILL. Father of the Agricultural and Mechanical Colleges. Die

ural and Mechanical Colleges. Died December 28, 1898.

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HON. WILLIAM H. HATCH. Father of Agricultural Experiment Stations. Died December 24, 1896.

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