History of the Peloponnesian War: Translated from the Greek of Thucydides

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Harper & Brothers, 1848 - Greece

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Page 113 - Of flutes and soft recorders - such as raised To height of noblest temper heroes old Arming to battle, and instead of rage Deliberate valour breathed, firm, and unmoved With dread of death to flight or foul retreat; Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
Page 113 - Their painful steps o'er the burnt soil : and now Advanced in view they stand ; a horrid front Of dreadful length and dazzling arms, in guise Of warriors old with order'd spear and shield ! Awaiting what command their mighty chief Had to impose : he through the armed files Darts his experienced eye, and soon traverse The whole battalion views, their order due, Their visages and stature as of gods ; Their number last he sums. And now his heart Distends with pride, and hardening in his strength Glories...
Page 113 - Deliberate valour breathed, firm and unmoved With dread of death to flight or foul retreat ; Nor wanting power to mitigate and suage, With solemn touches, troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish, and doubt, and fear, and sorrow, and pain, From mortal or immortal minds.
Page 113 - With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish, and doubt, and fear, and sorrow, and pain From mortal or immortal minds. Thus they, Breathing united force, with fixed thought, Moved on in silence to soft pipes, that charmed Their painful steps o'er the burnt soil...
Page 66 - Lacedaemonian allies ; otherwise, must continue to be the slaves of the Athenians ; where the best that can befall you, if neither sold for slaves nor put to death as rebels, will be a heavier yoke of tyranny than you ever yet have felt, while the liberty of the rest of Greece must by you for ever be obstructed.
Page 218 - The king or his general, at the head of his army drawn up in order of battle after a victory, under the royal standard displayed, attended by all the officers and nobility...
Page 297 - Having, moreover, fetched off the seven vessels belonging to the Chians, which assisted in forming the blockade at Piraeus, they set at liberty the slaves who were on board them, and threw all the freemen into prison. But to replace the whole number detached from the blockade of the Peloponnesians, they lost no time in fitting out other vessels and sending them to that post. They had also a scheme for the expeditious equipi 193,750*.
Page 283 - Thucydides has dexterously applied one to his countrymen that perished in Sicily. "The Syracusans," says he, " came down upon them and made a slaughter chiefly of those who were in the river. The water was immediately discolored with blood. But the stream polluted with mud and gore deterred them not from drinking it greedily, nor many of them from fighting desperately for a draught of it.
Page 136 - But, in process of time, these people were driven from thence by the Samians and other lonians, who, flying from the Medes, had landed in Sicily. And, after a short interval...
Page 136 - They declared Aristonus and Pystilus to be its founders, and gave it the civil institutions of Gela. Zancle was originally founded by a band of pirates, who arrived there from Cyme, a Chalcidic city in Opicia; though afterwards a numerous reinforcement from Chalcis and the rest of Euboea joined them, and possessed that district in community. The founders were Perieres and Crataemenes ; one of them from Cyme, the other from Chalcis. But the name of Zancle was first of all given it by the Sicilians,...

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