An Introduction to the Study of English Literature;: Comprising Representative Masterpieces in Poetry and Prose, Marking the Successive Stages of Its Growth, and a Methodical Exposition of the Governing Principles and General Forms, Both of the Language and Literature; with Copious Notes on the Selections - Glossary, and Chronology, Designed for Systematic Study

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Scribner, Armstrong, and Company, 1877 - English literature - 539 pages
 

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Page 297 - Behold, I go forward, but he is not there ; and backward, but I cannot perceive him : on the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him : he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him : but he knoweth the way that I take : when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold.
Page 304 - Oft she rejects, but never once offends. Bright as the sun, her eyes the gazers strike, And like the sun, they shine on all alike. Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride, Might hide her faults, if belles had faults to hide : If to her share some female errors fall, Look on her face, and you'll forget 'em all.
Page 381 - Ye whose hearts are fresh and simple, Who have faith in God and Nature, Who believe, that in all ages Every human heart is human, That in even savage bosoms There are longings, yearnings, strivings For the good they comprehend not, That the feeble hands and helpless, Groping blindly in the darkness, Touch God's right hand in that darkness And are lifted up and strengthened...
Page 195 - You have done that you should be sorry for. There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats; For I am arm'd so strong in honesty, That they pass by me as the idle wind Which I respect not.
Page 184 - He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man.
Page 315 - She said ; then raging to Sir Plume repairs, And bids her Beau demand the precious Hairs : (Sir Plume, of Amber Snuff-box justly vain, And the nice Conduct of a clouded Cane...
Page 399 - As unto the bow the cord is, So unto the man is woman ; Though she bends him, she obeys him, Though she draws him, yet she follows ; Useless each without the other...
Page 305 - But chiefly Love — to Love an altar built, Of twelve vast French romances neatly gilt, There lay three garters, half a pair of gloves. And all the trophies of his former loves.
Page 308 - Hampton takes its name. Here Britain's statesmen oft the fall foredoom Of foreign tyrants, and of nymphs at home; Here thou, great ANNA! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take — and sometimes tea. Hither the heroes and the nymphs resort, To taste awhile the pleasures of a court; In various talk th...
Page 384 - Showed the broad, white road in heaven, Pathway of the ghosts, the shadows, Running straight across the heavens, Crowded with the ghosts, the shadows. At the door on summer evenings Sat the little Hiawatha; Heard the whispering of the pine-trees. Heard the lapping of the water, Sounds of music, words of wonder; "Minne-wawa!

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