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ARNOLD'S CLASSICAL

CLASSICAL SERIES.

I.

A FIRST AND SECOND LATIN BOOK
AND PRACTICAL GRAMMAR. By Thomas K. ARNOLD, A. M. Revised and causfally

Corrected, by J. A. Spencer, A. M. One vol. 12mo., 75 cts

IL

.. LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION: A Practical Lutroduction to Latin Prose Composition. By THOMAS K. AnnOLD, A. M

Revised and Corrected by J. A. Spencer, A. M. 12mo., $1.

III.

FIRST GREEK BOOK;
Wib Easy Exercisos and Vocabulary. By Thomas K. ARNOLD, A. M.

rected by J. A. Spencer, A. M. 12ino., 75 cts.

Lovised and Oor

IV.
GREEK PROSE COMPOSITION:
A Practical Introduction to Greek Prose Composition. By Thomas K. ARNOLD, A. A.

Revised and Corrected by J. A. Spencer, A. M. One vol. 12mo., 75 cts.

v.

GREEK READING BOOK,
For the Use of Schools; containing the substance of the Practical Introduction to Greek Con

struing, and a Treatise on the Greek Particles, by the Rev. Thomas K. ARNOLD,
A. M., and also a Copious Selection from Greek Authors, with English

Notes, Critical and Explanatory, and a Lexicon, hy

J. A. Spencer, A. M. 12mo., $1 25

VI.

CORNELIUS NEPOS;
With Practical Questions and Answers, and an Imitative Exercise on each Chapter. By
THOMAS K. ARNOLD, A. M. Revised, with Additional Notes, by Prof. Johnson,
Professor of the Latin Language in the University of the City of
New-York. 12mo. A new, enlarged edition, with

Lexicon, Index, &c., $1.
" ARNOLD'S GREEK AND LATIN SERIES. –The publication of this valuable collection of
Classical school books may be regarded as the presage of better things in respect to the mode of
teaching and acquiring languages. Heretofore boys have been condemned to the drudgery of
going over Latin and Greek Grammar without the remotest conception of the value of what
They were learning, and every day becoming more and more disgusted with the dry and un.
meaning task; but now, by Mr. Arnold's admirable method-substantially the same with that oj
Allendorff-the moment they take up the study of Latin or Greek, they begin to learn sentences,
to acquire ideas, to see how the Romans and Greeks expressed themselves, how their mode of
expression differed from ours, and by degrees they lay up a stock of knowledge which is utterly
astonishing to those who have dragged on muith alter month in the old-fashioned, dry, and
tedious way of learning languages.

“Mr. Arnold, in fact, has had the good sense to adopt the system of nature. A child lear his own language by imitating what he hears, and constantly repeating it till ii is lastene i in the memory; in the same way Mr. A. puis the pupil immediately to work a: Exercises in Latin and Greck, involving the elementary principles of the language-words are supplied--the mode of putting them together is told the pupil-he is shown how the ancients expressed their ideas; and ther., by repeating these things again and again-iterum ileruinque--the docilo pupil has thern indelibly impressed upon his memory and rooted in his understanding.

“The American Editor is a thorough classical scholar, and has been a practical teacher for years in this city. He has devoted the utmost care to a complete revision of Mr. Arnold's works, has corrected several errors of inadvertence or otherwise, has rearranged and improved various matters in the early volumes of the series, and has attended most diligently to the accurate prin ing and mechanical execution of the whole. We anticipate most confidently the speedy adopcion of these works in our schools and colleges."

Arnold's Series of Classical Works has attained a circulation almost unparalleled, boing introduced into nearly all the Colleges and leading Educational Institutions in the United States

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TITUS LIVIUS.

CHIEFLY FROM THE TEXT OF. ALSCHEFSKI.

WITH

ENGLISH NOTES, GRAMMATICAL AND EXPLANATORY

TOGETHER
WITH A GEOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL INDEX.

BY J. L. LINCOLN,

Professor of Latin in Brown University. WITH AN ACCOMPANYING PLAN OF ROME, AND A MAP OF THE PASSAGE OF HANNIBAL

One volume, 12mo. Price $1. The publishers believe that, in the edition of Livy herewith announced a want is supplied which nas been universally felt; there being previous to this no American edition surnished with the requisite apparatus for the successful prosecution of the study of this Latin author.

OPINIONS OF CLASSICAL PROFESSORS.

From Professor Kingsley, of Yale College. I have not yet been able to read the whole of your work, but have examined it enough to be satisfied that it is judiciously prepared, and well adapted to the purpose intended. We use it for the present year, in connection with the edition that has been used for several years. Most of the class, however, have procured your edition ; and it is probable that next year it will be used by all.''

From Professor Tyler, of Amherst College. “ The notes seem to me to be prepared with much care, learning, and taste; the grammatica! illustrations are unusually full, faithful, and able. The book has been used by our Freshinan Class, and will I doubt not come into general use in our colleges.

From Professor Packard, of Boudoin College. “I have recommended your edition to our Freshman Class. I have no doubt that your labor will give a new impulse to the study of this charming classic.

From Professor Anderson, of Waterville College. “ A careful examination of several portions of your work has convinced me that, for the use of students it is altogether superior to any edition of Livy with which I am acquainted. Among its excellences you will I rmit me to name, the close aitention given to particles—to the subjunctive mood—the constant references to the gramınars--the discrimination of words nearly synonymous, and the care in giving the localities mentioned in the text. The book will be nere after used in our college."

From Professor Johnson, of New-York University.. “I can at present only say that your edition pleases mo much. I shall give it to one of my classes next week. I am prepared to tind it just what was wanted.”

WORKS OF HORACE. WITH ENGLISH NOTES, CRITICAL AND EXPLANATORY.

BY J. L. LINCOLN,

Professor of Latin in Brown University.
WITH MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

One volume, 12mo.

The text of this edition is chiefly that of Orelli; and the Notes, besides embodying whatever is valuable in the most recent and approved German editions of Horace, contain the results of the Editor's studies and experience as a College Professor, which he has been gathering and maturing for several years with a view to publication. It has been the aim of both the Publishers and the Editor to make this edition in all respects suitable to the wants of American schools and colleges.

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مرگ و میر میر سے مری کا کرم ایران اور پیر امین اور مریم

THE

WORKS OF HORACE:

WITH

ENGLISH NOTES.

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.

BY

J. L. LINCOLN,

PROFESSOR OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

IN BROWN UNIVERSITY.

NEW-YORK:
D. APPLETON & COMPANY, 200 BROADWAY.

PHILADELPHIA:
GEO. S. APPLETON, 164 CHESNUT-ST.

ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851, by

D. APPLETON & COMPANY,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of New York.

BRITISH

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PREFACE.

The text of this edition of Horace is that of Orelli, as it ex. ists in his second edition, published in two successive volumes in 1843 and 1844; the comparatively few readings of Orelli, which have not been adopted, are given at the foot of the page, with his name attached to them. As will be seen, the most important various readings are also given in foot-notes; a plan which, it is believed, will, so far as it has been well executed, meet with the approbation of scholars and teachers.

In preparing the Notes, I have derived invaluable aid from the edition of Orelli, already mentioned, and from the excellent work of Dillenburger, in many respects a model of a school edition of a classical author, published first in 1843, and, in a revised form, in 1848. These editions I have had constantly before me, and have freely consulted; and the obligations I am conscious of owing them are so great and various, that I cannot specify them in detail, and can adequately state them only by a general acknowledgment. At the same time, it is not improper to say, that what I have gained from these editors, I have not appropriated by mere translation or compilation, but have so modified and changed by independent examination and study, that I deem myself entitled to consider it, in some sense at least, my own; and, moreover,

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