The speeches of the Right Hon. Henry Grattan: to which is added his letter on the union, with a commentary on his career and character, Volume 3

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J. Duffy, 1822 - Ireland - 468 pages

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Page 401 - Has the gentleman done? Has he completely done? He was unparliamentary from the beginning to the end of his speech. There was scarce a word he uttered that was not a violation of the privileges of the House. But I did not call him to order — why? Because the limited talents of some men render it impossible for them to be severe without being unparliamentary. But before I sit down I shall show him how to be severe and parliamentary at the same time.
Page 387 - ... the consent of the people, given by themselves or their deputies. And this properly concerns only such governments where the legislative is always in being, or at least where the people have not reserved any part of the legislative to deputies, to be from time to time chosen by themselves.
Page 404 - I was the parent and the founder, from the assassination of such men as the right honourable gentleman, and his unworthy associates. They are corrupt — they are seditious— and they, at this very moment, are in a conspiracy against their country. I have returned to refute a libel, as false as it is malicious, given to the public under the appellation of a report of the committee of the Lords. Here I stand ready for impeachment or trial. I dare accusation.
Page 313 - There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats ; For I am armed so strong in honesty, That they pass by me as the idle wind Which I respect not.
Page 146 - Things of this world are in so constant a flux that nothing remains long in the same state. Thus people, riches, trade, power change their stations...
Page 402 - I know the difficulty the honourable gentleman laboured under when he attacked me, conscious that, on a comparative view of our characters, public and private, there is nothing he could say which would injure me. The public would not believe the charge. I despise the falsehood. If such a charge were made by an honest man, I would answer it in the manner I shall do before I sit down—but I shall first reply to it, when not made by an honest man. The right hon gentleman has called me
Page 402 - ... nothing he could say which would injure me. The public would not believe the charge ; — I despise the falsehood. If such a charge were made by an honest man, I would answer it in the manner I shall do before I sit down. But I shall first reply to it when not made by an honest man. The right honourable gentleman has called me " an unimpeached traitor." I ask, why not " traitor," unqualified by any epithet ? I will tell him ; it was because he dared not.
Page 146 - To what gross absurdities the following of custom, when reason has left it, may lead, we may be satisfied, when we see the bare name of a town, of which there remains not so much as the ruins, where scarce so much housing as a sheepcote, or more inhabitants than a shepherd is to be found, sends as many representatives to the grand assembly of law-makers, as a whole county numerous in people, and powerful in riches.
Page 402 - traitor," unqualified by any epithet ? I will tell him : it was because he durst not. It was the act of a coward, who raises his arm to strike, but has not courage to give the blow. I will not call him villain, because it would be unparliamentary, and he is a privy counsellor.
Page 402 - I care not how high his situation, how low his character, how contemptible his speech; whether a privy councilor or a parasite, my answer would be a blow. He has charged me with being connected with the rebels. The charge is utterly, totally, and meanly false. Does the honorable gentleman rely on the report of the House of Lords for the foundation of his assertion? If he does, I can prove to the committee there was a physical impossibility of that report being true. But I scorn to answer any man...

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