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The benefit of the Free Surgical Hospital for Women, supported by the Mur»ck Liquid Food Company, Boston, is being recognized in all parts of the nited States. Ladies suffering for the want of an operation (known as capital se) are coming from all sections.

Liquid food is given before and after all operations.
The quarterly report ending June 1st, 1887, shows

-132

Operations were made, and the patients camefrom Texas. 2 from Colorado. 1 from Montreal. 2 from Alabama. 2 from since Edward Island. 5 from Rhode Island. + from Connecticut. 4 from ermont. 10 from Maine. 4 from New Hampshire. 97 from Massachusetts, om 20 towns and cities.

And physician having a surgical case can have a bed assigned to him by forming us of the case. In addition to our 150 FREE BEDS!

we have just completed a Septic IIospital of 12 Free Beds, all for Surgical Cases.

The Surgical Staft at Murdock's Free Hospital for Women are in daily attendance, except Saturdays, to examine patients and assign beds.

EVERY BED FREE. Cases have been built up by the use of our Liquid Food for 30 to 60 days so at the wound healed without the aid of an operation. We also have cases where e has been sustained by its aid alone for several days. When not retained by e stomach, injections can be given with success.

Liquid Food is adapted for all ages, in health or disease, as it will make by le use of one tablespoonful four times daily for an adult, eight per cent. new ood weekly. It is recommended by the Medical Profession as the ONLY RAW OOD KNOWN, free from insoluble matter, drugs, materials, salts or acids, and rries the blood corpuscles.

If a baby does not thrive, never change its food, but add five or more drops each feeding, and its lost or needed vitality will be developed in 30 days.

Our Free Home for Homeless Boys contains 50 beds, and is located at 11 to Causeway Street. When any of the boys suffer from Scrofula, Eczema or other in discases, they recover quickly by the use of onr Liquid Food.

We use in our Hospital 200 large bottles of every lot made. This gives a guarantee of Teetness of every botile sold, and is not given by any manufacturer of any other preparation in e world.

Murdock's Liquid Food Co., Boston.

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College of Physicians and Surgeons

STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOW

OF CHICAGO.
REGULAR SESSION OPENS SEPTEMBER 21, 1887.
GRADED COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.

Excellent Clinical Advantages,
The College Building, directly opposite the Cook
County Hospital, is one of the most complete and
elaborate edifices devoting to medical teaching in this
country.

FEES.-WINTER SESSION : Matriculation (paid annually), $5; General Ticket, admitting to all the lectures and including ali practical work in the chemical and physiological laboratories, $60. D. A. K. STEELE, M. D., Secretary,

1801 State St., Chicago, Ill. A. REEVES JACKSON, M. D., President.

271 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Ni.

AT IOWA CITY, IA. The next Session will begin on October 5th, 13 and continue until March 7th, 1888.

There are two plans of instruction, viz: courses graded and three courses non-graded.

The facilities for dissecting and clinical study 3 unsurpassed.

TERM EXPENSES.
Decture Ticket, $20. Demunstrators Ticket Sr.
Matriculation Ticket $5. Hospital Tiekei

Examination Fee (for final examination) $25.
No Charge for dissecting Material.
For further Information address,
Dr. R. W. Hill, Sec'y,

IOWA CITY, IA.

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL MEDICAL COLLEGE

CITY OF NEW YORK.

SESSIONS OF 1887--88. The REGULAR SESSIon begins on Wednesday, September 21, 1887, and ends about the midd of March, 1888. During this Session, in addition to the regular didactic lectures, two or three hours are daily allotted to clinical instruction. Attendance upon at least two regular course of lectures is required for graduation.

The SPRING SESSION consists of recitations, clinical lectures and exercises, and didactic lectures on special subjects. This Session-begins about the middle of March and continues until the middle of June. During this Session, daily recitations in all the departments are held by : corps of Examiners appointed by the Faculty.

The CARNEGIE LABORATORY is open during the collegiate year, for instruction in microscopical examinations of urine, practical demonstrations in medical and surgical pathology, and lessons in normal histology and pathology, including bacteriology.

For the annual Circular and Catalogue, giving requirements for graduation and other information, address Prof. AUSTIN FLINT, Secretary, Bellevue Hospital Medical College, foot of East 26th Street, New York City.

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Cincinnati Sanitarium.
A PRIVATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE.

COLLEGE HILL, OHIO. Thirteen years successful operation. One hundred and fifty patients admitted annually. Daily average sixty. Cottages for nervous invalids, opium habit, inebriety, etc. Location salubrious. Surroundings delightful. Appliances ample. Charges reasonable. Accessible by rail, six trains daily, 40 minutes from C. H. & D. depot., Fifth and Hoadly Sts., Cincinnati. For particulars, address ORPHEUS EVERTS, M. D., Supt., College Hill, Ohio.

[16]

W

WONDERFUL!
The Publisher of this Journal can now furnish the readers an opportunity for obtaining

JOURNALS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE.
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Name.

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Annals of Surgery (new subscribers only)...$5... $2... $7... $5.50
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5... 4.00 Make all drafts, checks and money orders to payable to S. EMORY LANPHEAR, M, D.,

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LIO.

fou:

EUREKA CHAIR CO.,

FACTORY: WORCESTER, MASS. For further information address

P. P. Bradt, Lowell, Mass.

FOR OR AGAINST.

Nations, states, political parties, all organizations as well as individuals have their principles or policy, good or bad, by which their actions are governed, and commercial houses are no exception to the rule..

It sometimes happens that a thoroughly bad or dishonest policy may seem to be remunerative for a time. Commercial history has, however, emphatically taught the truth of the old platitude, that “honesty is the best policy.”

Honesty applied to the manufacture of medicines means recognition of the fact that the permanence of a business existence depends on appreciation of the identity of the interests of the seller and buyer.

In no industry has this principle been more openly ignored and violated than in the drug trade. The consumers of drugs, the public, are not judges of the purity or value of a medicinal product as they are of other necessaries, as bread or meat, and hence the way is open for imposition by the sale of nostrums and patent medicines, many of which are either inert or positively harmful.

The evils of the sale of patent medicines to the public are, however, recognized and condemned by physicians. An abuse which is not so well recognized is the protection of medicinal preparations by securing and maintaining a proprietary interest therein. Such protection places on the market a class of products which, equally with nostrums, can be sold to the public without the intervention of the physician. Moreover, whatever may have been their original value the fact that their working formula is known only to their proprietors opens the way to sophistication, the substitution of cheaper or inferior, inert or even dangerous, ingredients for those on which the reputation of the product has been based.

The sale of these classes of medicines, we believe, does great injustice to physicians and harm to the public. The principle of protection as applied to medicinal formula is radically wrong.

In this belief, we resolved at the commencement of our business career to protect none of our products by patent, copyright or trade mark, but to rely for reputation and commercial success on their superior excellence, on our skill in manufacture, our enterprise in discovering new preparations of value and in improving old ones. Our products reach the public only through the physician's prescription.

This policy all thoughtful physicians must appreciate is not only the most liberal, and intrinsically the most ethical, but must necessarily lead us, in carrying it out, to work with and for, not against, the medical profession. We feel, therefore, that our claim for the patronage of physicians is a valid one based on our mutual interests, and that preference for our products should be shown in prescribing.

a

Very respectfully yours,

PARKE, Davis & Co.,

Manufacturing Chemists,

EW YORK:

60 Maiden Lane and
21 Liberty Street.

DETROIT, MICH.

KANSAS CITY MEDICAL INDEX.

EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY

S. EMORY LANPHEAR, M. D.' PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE MIND AND NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE UNIVERSITY O KANSAS CITY, PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA IN THE KANSAS

CITY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY.

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Glioma is a name given to a tumor found principally in the brain, optic nerve, and retina ; it shows no tendency to invade the meni.ges of the brain; it has been found in the liver and other organs. Virchow records a case as occurring in the supra-renal capsule. Its position among morbid growths has not been positively settled, some authors placing it as a neuroma; others as a sarcoma. It occurs most frequently in the retina and when found in this locality is almost always in early childhood. It is in most cases probably a congenital affection, the oldest patient in whom it has been observed being twelve years old. Glioma is the only malignant growth observed taking its origin from the retinal tissue.

From a histological point, glioma (or glio-sarcoma) must be placed among the small round-cell sarcomata. Its elements are about the size of white blood cells, with a very small amount of intra-cellular tissue. The cells are inclined to degenerate, as deposits of lime are often found in these growths. The question as to whether glioma is a malignant growth is unsettled, Von Graefe places it among the malignant neoplasms and adds that it becomes more so by the length of its ex. istence and increase of its development. When occurring in the retina, in the majority of cases it extends to the optic nerve and from thence to the brain. It is in this tendency to extend to the brain that the greatest danger from retinal glioma lies.

The prognosis is always extremely grave, even though the eye is early removed, as we have no guarantee that the optic nerve is not already implicated. For this reason the eye should be removed as soon as possible for by an early operation we give the patient the only hope of recovery. Cases are recorded where by an early operation several years have elapsed before the disease returned. I copy the follow

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