The Psychology of Conduct: Applied to the Problem of Moral Education in the Public Schools

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"This book represents an attempt to draw on the best of ancient and modern thought for contributions to an effort toward the solution of the main problems of moral education. Its chief concern is to trace conduct to its sources, and to show briefly how the principles evolved may be applied to the actual work of teaching. The book was not written for specialists. It is in tended for the use of teachers and those preparing to teach, and contains material elaborated and tested in the author's classes during a period of ten years. The educational applications of the principles studied are worked out only in part, as the teacher will readily make his own applications to the varying situations and conditions he meets in the course of his work. No great amount of originality is claimed for the book. Something of the historical development of certain phases of the problem of moral education has been given, and numerous quotations are made from Kant to show that to-day the problems of ethical theory and of moral education are practically what they were in the days of that great thinker"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

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Page 65 - tis no matter; Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on ? how then ? Can honour set to a leg? No. Or an arm? No. Or take away the grief of a wound ? No. Honour hath no skill in surgery then ? No. What is honour? A word. What is in that word, honour? What is that honour? Air. A trim reckoning ! — Who hath it? He that died o
Page 116 - Then gently scan your brother man, Still gentler sister woman ; Tho' they may gang a kennin wrang, To step aside is human : One point must still be greatly dark, The moving why they do it : And just as lamely can ye mark, How far perhaps they rue it.
Page 90 - Then let us pray that come it may, As come it will for a' that ; That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth, May bear the gree, and a' that. For a
Page 98 - True love's the gift which God has given To man alone beneath the heaven : It is not fantasy's hot fire, Whose wishes, soon as granted, fly ; It liveth not in fierce desire, With dead desire it doth not die ; It is the secret sympathy, The silver link,1 the silken tie, Which heart to heart, and mind to mind, In body and in soul can bind.
Page 177 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 103 - Perception of distress in others, is a natural excitement, passively to pity, and actively to relieve it : but let a man set himself to attend to, inquire out, and relieve distressed persons, and he cannot but grow less and less sensibly affected with the various miseries of life, with which he must become acquainted ; when yet, at the same time, benevolence, considered not as a passion, but as a practical principle of action, will strengthen: and whilst he passively compassionates the distressed...
Page 101 - The chariest maid is prodigal enough, If she unmask her beauty to the moon : Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes : The canker galls the infants of the spring Too oft before their buttons be disclosed, And in the morn and liquid dew of youth Contagious blastments are most imminent.
Page 116 - Tho' they may gang a kennin wrang, To step aside is human : One point must still be greatly dark, The moving Why they do it ; And just as lamely can ye mark, How far perhaps they rue it. Who made the heart, 'tis He alone Decidedly can try us, He knows each chord its various tone, Each spring its various bias : Then at the balance let's be mute, We never can adjust it ; What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted.
Page 155 - What conscience dictates to be done, Or warns me not to do, This, teach me more than hell to shun, That, more than Heaven pursue. What blessings Thy free bounty gives, Let me not cast away; For God is paid when man receives, T
Page 173 - Truth crushed to earth, shall rise again The eternal years of God are hers; But Error, wounded, writhes in pain, And dies among his worshippers.

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