The Pioneers, Or The Sources of the Susquehanna: A Descriptive Tale, Volume 2

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Carey, Lea, & Blanchard, 1838

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Page 2 - In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States. entitled, " an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned." And also to an act, entitled, " an act, supplementary to an act, entitled, an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page 125 - What does he see?" said Elizabeth: "there must be some animal in sight." Hearing no answer from her companion, Miss Temple turned her head, and beheld Louisa standing with her face whitened to the color of death, and her finger pointing upward, with a sort of flickering, convulsed motion.
Page 2 - District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " THE CHILD'S BOTANY," In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page 127 - Elizabeth saw, as Brave fastened his teeth in the side of his enemy, that the collar of brass around...
Page 125 - be quiet, Brave ! what do you see, fellow ?" At the sounds of her voice, the rage of the mastiff, instead of being at all diminished, was very sensibly increased. He stalked in front of the ladies, and seated himself at the feet of his mistress, growling louder than before, and occasionally giving vent to his ire by a short, surly barking. " What does he see ?" said Elizabeth, " there must be some animal in sight.
Page 42 - ... to a body ; hurting nothing ; being, as it was, as harmless as a garter-snake. But now it gives me sore thoughts when I hear the frighty things whizzing through the air, for I know it's only a motion to bring out all the brats in the village.
Page 43 - ... or how to bring it up again with a true aim; but it's wicked to be shooting into flocks in this wasty manner; and none do it who know how to knock over a single bird. If a body has a craving for pigeon's flesh, why! it's made the same as all other creaters, for man's eating; but not to kill twenty and eat one.
Page 123 - By this time they had gained the summit of the mountain, where they left the highway and pursued their course under the shade of the stately trees that crowned the eminence. The day was becoming warm, and the girls plunged more deeply into the forest, as they found its invigorating coolness agreeably contrasted to the excessive heat they had experienced in the ascent.
Page 45 - Put an ind, Judge, to your clearings. An't the woods His work as well as the pigeons? Use, but don't waste. Wasn't the woods made for the beasts and birds to harbor in? and when man wanted their flesh, their skins, or their feathers, there's the place to seek them. But...

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