The Classic Myths in English Literature: Based Chiefly on Bulfinch's "Age of Fable" (1855), Accompanied by an Interpretative and Illustrative Commentary

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Charles Mills Gayley
Ginn, 1893 - English literature - 540 pages

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Contents

The Silver Age
44
Longfellows Prometheus
46
The Brazen Age
48
Deucalion and Pyrrha
49
ATTRIBUTES OF THE GODS OF HEAVEN 5173
51
The Great Gods
52
Juno Hera
54
Minerva Athene
56
36 Mars Ares
57
Vulcan Hephæstus
58
Phæbus Apollo Shelleys Hymn of Apollo
59
Diana Artemis Ben Jonsons Hymn to Diana
63
Venus Aphrodite Extract from Sills Venus of Milo
65
Mercury Hermes
66
Vesta Hestia
69
Lesser Divinities of Heaven Gosses Eros
70
Lines by Spenser 7
71
ATTRIBUTES OF THE GODS OF EARTH 7477
74
ATTRIBUTES OF THE GODS OF
85
MYTHS OF THE GREAT DIVINITIES
91
Ægina
100
Antiope Lines from Tennysons Amphion
102
Jupiter a friend of man Baucis and Philemon Lines from Swifts Baucis and Philemon
105
Junos Best Gift Lines from Gosses Sons of Cydippe
108
The Contest with Neptune Arachne Extract from Spensers Muiopotmos
109
Mars and Diomede Extract from Lang Leaf Myers Iliad
112
Mars and Minerva Extract from Lang Leaf Myers Iliad
113
Mars and Mortals The Fortunes of Cadmus
114
Myths of Vulcan
117
The Wanderings of Latona
118
Apollo the Light Triumphant
119
Hyacinthus I 20
120
Phaëton
121
The Plague sent upon the Greeks before Troy Extract from Lang Leaf Myers Iliad
125
The Punishment of Niobe Lines from Landors Niobe 126
129
Æsculapius
130
Admetus and Alcestis Extracts from Brownings Balaus tions Adventure
132
Apollo the Musician
136
The Loves of Apollo
138
Clytie Lines by Thomas Moore
141
The Flight of Arethusa Shelleys Arethusa
142
The Fate of Actæon
145
The Fortunes and Death of Orion
146
Hero and Leander Extracts from Marlowes Hero
164
Pyramus and Thisbe
170
FROM THE EARTH TO THE UNDER
181

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Page 434 - And, missing thee, I walk unseen On the dry smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.
Page 335 - Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades Vext the dim sea : I am become a name ; For always roaming with a hungry heart Much have I seen and known ; cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but...
Page 80 - From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods may be That no life lives for ever; That dead men rise up never ; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea.
Page 444 - The Niobe of nations ! there she stands, Childless and crownless, in her voiceless woe; An empty urn within her withered hands, Whose holy dust was scattered long ago ; The Scipios...
Page 197 - THE woods decay, the woods decay and fall, The vapours weep their burthen to the ground, Man comes and tills the field and lies beneath, And after many a summer dies the swan.
Page 467 - Castalian spring, might with this Paradise Of Eden strive ; nor that Nyseian isle Girt with the river Triton, where old Cham, Whom Gentiles Ammon call and Libyan Jove, Hid Amalthea, and her florid son Young Bacchus, from his stepdame Rhea's eye ; Nor where Abassin kings their issue guard, Mount Amara, though this by some supposed True Paradise, under the Ethiop line By Nilus...
Page 421 - The oracles are dumb, No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance or breathed spell Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Page 222 - Wherewith she sits on diamond rocks, Sleeking her soft alluring locks; By all the nymphs that nightly dance Upon thy streams with wily glance: Rise, rise, and heave thy rosy head From thy coral-paven bed, And bridle in thy headlong wave, Till thou our summons answered have.
Page 249 - Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake : Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog...
Page 418 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...

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