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measures established by Congress, to be kept for the use of this Territory.

Approved March 3, 1852.

RESOLUTION MAKING AN APPROPRIATION TO THE
SURVEYOR GENERAL.

Resolved by the Governor and Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, That the sum of five hundred dollars be, and is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury, not otherwise appropriated, to the surveyor general of the Territory, for his official service, due from the date of his appointment to oflice, to the first day of August, 1851.

Approved March 3, 1852.

RESOLUTIONS TO REVISE AND CLASSIFY THE LAWS
OF DEŞERET.

Resolved by the Governor and Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, That a Joint Committee of the two committee to Houses of the Legislative Assembly, to consist of threerevine and members of the House of Representatives, and two mem-laws of Desere bers of the Council, be elected by the joint vote of the Legislative Assembly, whose duty it shall be, to revise and classify the laws of the State of Deseret, which have been legalized by this assembly, so as to apply to the Territor-who sball act ial organization of the Territory, and that they be, and during recese are hereby authorized to perform said duty during the assembly. recess of the Legislative Assembly, and make report to the Legislature on the first Monday of January next.

Approved Oct, 4, 1851.

RESOLUTION IN RELATION TO WILLIAM M. LEMON'S
SURVEYS.

Resolved by the Governor and Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, That all lands within this Territory, that were surveyed by the late William M. Lemon, county surveyor of Great Salt Lake county, which have not been returned in the office of the surveyor general, the claimants of such lands are hereby required to present such claims with the claimants names,tracts, parcel, piece or parts of land so claimed, to the surveyor general, by or before the first day of June, A. D. 1852. All pieces and parcels of land not known in said office after that date, will be only known as unsurveyed land, subject to be given out to applicants.

Approved March 3, 1852.

MEMORIAL SIGNED BY THE MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF UTAH, TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

GREAT Salt Lake City, Sept. 29, 1851. To Millard Fillmore, President of the United States, of Vorth America.

The undersigned, members of the Legislative Assembly for the Territory of Utah, do hereby most respectfully beg leave to show, that, whereas, two of the Honorable Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States for the Territory of Utah, and the Hon. B. D. Harris, secretary of the Territory, have removed from the Territory of Utah, and consequently vacated their offices within the same therefore your memorialists do most earnestly solicit, and pray the Chief Executive of the United States to fill those vacancies as speedily as possible.

Accumulated influences of a disagreeable nature may be regarded as our apology for trespassing upon the attention of our highly honored Chief Magistrate at this time. The vacating of important public offices in a manner as unwarranted as it is unprecedented at this peculiar crisis of our colonial settlement and government, have created mingled sensations of an extraordinary character, whieh we wish briefly to pour into the bosom of the National Executive.

Immediately consequent upon the settlement of this colony, a large and heterogenious emigration followed upon our heels,remaining here

a shorter or longer time, imperatively requiring the establishment of an efficient government, for the speedy protection of life, peace, virtue, and property. In addition to a transient and ungovernable emigration, almost constant Indian depredations have plead like the irresisiable maw of death for the institution of some formidable order, and power of government amongst us. A provisional government was accordingly formed, which has met the exigencies of the people, and secured general tranquility, order, and satisfaction. And when the announcement of a Territorial government, under your fostering hand, reached us, it was hailed with shoutings and firing of eannon. But, sir, the officers appointed sufficiently early to have reached here last winter, did not arrive till July last, when measures had been taken by the Governor of Utah, for taking the census, and securing an election of delegate to Congress, and members of the Legislature, without the seal of the Hon. Secretary of the Territory. And now, in the very dawn of the arrival of the government oflicers, and of our hopes of an efficient Territorial government, we are most seriously embarrassed with their unprovoked departure from the limits of the Territory, taking with them the judiciary, the public seal, and public fund, leaving us in a more crippled condition, if possible, than previous to their arrival, thereby tantalizing a people of more than spartan intrepidity and fortitude, that have long been struggling against the most invincible difficulties. The first demand upon the honorable Secretary, for stationery, desks, and such contingent expenses as might necessarily accrue in the outset of a Legislative Assembly, has been peremptorily refused. Not only so, but all the authorities of the Territory, including the Governor and both Houses of the Assembly and Marshal, have been set at nought, as exercising their functionsillegally and unconstitutionally. (Sce document marked No. 8.)

Thus, sir, when we have looked for the fostering aid of such a functionary as the honorable Secretary, and for a fellow citizen, worthy the honor conferred by our illustrious Chief Magistrate, we have been annoyed with the technics, of legal quackery, and our respectful address for stationery, &c., has been responded to, not as to legislators of the undivided choice, and sole representation of a sovereign people, who know the right of franchise, and of self government under the conslitution, but as to men who ape authority that does not belong to them. Although we are ipso facto honored with the choice of a sorerign and free people to be their representatives in Legislative Assembly, and the refusal of a captious stranger to accredit us with the fact, does not shake the truth, still a studious violation of etiquette when it is designed to convey burlesque, contempt, and indignity, upon a legislative body, is calculated to alien ate a people from such functionaries.

Your memorialists being aware of the difficulty of sending mer from the states to fill the vacancies that have accrued from the removal of the two honorable Judges, and the Hon. B. D. Harris, during the period of many months to come; and feeling cautious against any possible future removals like those which now embarrass us with the want of a Territorial seal and funds to meet constantly accruing expenses, and also the want of a full Supreme Court of the United States for Utah Territory; and desirous to dwell in peace and unfeigned loyalty to the constitution and General Government of the United States, do therefore pray our highly honored Chief Magistrate to appoint men to fill the aforesaid vacancies, by and with the consent of the Senate, who are indeed residents amongst us, in order that we may enjoy the full administration of every department of government speedily,as the prosperity of the Territory shall require And your memorialists, as in duty bound, will ever pray.

WILLARD RICHARDS,

President of the Council. A. L. LAMEREAUX,

HEBER C. KIMBALL, JOHN STOKER,

DANIEL H. WELLS, GIDEON BROWNELL, AARON JOHNSON, JAMES BROWN,

ALEXANDER WILLIAMS, DAVID B. DILLE,

ISAAC MORLEY, JAMES G. BROWNING, JOHN S. FULLMER, DAVID EVANS,

CHARLES R. DANA, WILLIAM MILLER,

ORSON SPENCER, LEVI W. HANCOCK,

GEO. A. SMITH, CHARLES SHUMWAY. LOREN FARR,

W. W. PHELPS,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. DAVID FULLMER,

DANIEL SPENCER, ALBERT P. ROCKWOOD, NATHANIEL H. FELT, EDWIN D. WOOLLEY, PHINEAS RICHARDS, JOSEPH YOUNG,

B. F. JOHNSON, H. G. SHERWOOD,

HOSEA STOUT. WILFORD WOODRUFF,

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MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS FOR AN APPROPRIATION FOR THE

ERECTION OF A TERRITORIAL PRISON.

To the Honorable, the Senate and House of Representatives of the Uni

ted States, in Congress Assembled.

Your memorialists, the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, would respectfully suggest to your honorable body, the necessity of a suitable building for a Territorial Prison in this Territory.

In doing this, we would remind your honorable body, though our locality is quite remote from the exercise of Judicial authority in other states or territories, still we are not beyond the pale of frequent and multiplied crimes and offenses which demand the retribution of imprisonment. The expense of building a safe prison, sufficiently large to meet the liabilities of convicted criminals in this Territory, is greater than a distant observer might readily apprehend.

This more than ordinary expense arises both from the extraordinary cost of labor and materials, and also from the multiplication of criminals thrown into the Territory by a transient and wayfaring population, as well as our own. The early erection of a substantial prison it is believed would not only tend to prevent crime, but also to reform the offenders and put them in the way of self support. The infancy of the Territory renders the erection of such a prison, at present, without the aid of Congress, too great a work for the finanyour

memorialists. Your memorialists therefore respectfully pray your honorable body, to appropriate the sum of sixty thousand dollars for the speedy erection of a Territorial Prison for Utah Territory; and your memorialists, as in duty bound, will ever pray.

Approved Jan. 30, 1852.

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MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS TO ESTABLISH A SEMI-MONTHLY MAIL

FROM GREAT SALT LAKE CITY TO SAN DIEGO.

To the Honorable, the Senate and House of Representatives of the United

States in Congress Assembled.

The Governor and Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, respectfully memorialize your honorable body for the following pur

pose, viz:

Whereas, the locality of Utah Territory is such, as to render it inaccessible to the mail from Missouri during four months in the year, previous to the present winter; and also, for a period of six months in the year, it is inaccessible to the mail from Sacramento and Oregon

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