Shakespeare and the Rival Playwrights, 1600-1606

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Routledge, Sep 11, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 236 pages
David Farley-Hills argues that Shakespeare did not work in splendid isolation, but responded as any other playwright to the commercial and artistic pressures of his time. In this book he offers an interpretation of seven of Shakespeare's plays in the light of pressures exerted by his major contemporary rivals. The plays discussed are Hamlet, Troilus and Cressida, All's Well That Ends Well, Othello, Measure for Measure, Timon of Athens, and King Lear.

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Contents

Introduction
TROILUS AND CRESSIDA
ALLS WELL THAT ENDS WELL
A MAN KILLED WITH KINDNESS
MEASURE FOR MEASURE AND MIDDLETONS COMEDY
TIMON OF ATHENS AND KING LEAR
Notes
Index
Copyright

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