The United Service Magazine, Part 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 125 - Then, as to the great question of Church Reform, on that head I have no new professions to make. I cannot give my consent to the alienation of Church property, in any part of the United Kingdom, from strictly ecclesiastical purposes.
Page 122 - My acceptance of the first office in the Government terminates for the present my political connexion with you. In seeking the renewal of it, whenever you shall be called upon to perform the duty of electing a representative in Parliament, I feel it incumbent upon me to enter into a declaration of my views of public policy — as full and unreserved as I can make it, consistently with my duty as a Minister of the Crown. You are entitled to this from the nature of the trust which I again solicit —...
Page 123 - Bill itself ; and, secondly, whether he will act upon the spirit in which it was conceived. With respect to the Reform Bill itself, I will repeat now the declaration which I made when I entered the House of Commons as a Member of the Reformed Parliament, that I consider the Reform Bill a final and irrevocable settlement of a great constitutional question — a settlement which no friend to the peace and welfare of this country would attempt to disturb, either by direct or by insiduous means.
Page 418 - Accordingly he, with two or three others, went down into the hold, and closing up all the hatches, filled several pots full of brimstone and other combustible matter, and set it on fire, and so continued till they were almost suffocated, when some of the men cried out for air. At length he opened the hatches, not a little pleased that he held out the longest.
Page 106 - ... honour him through the day ; to govern your temper and your tongue ; to be faithful to your duty ; to keep yourselves unspotted from the world ; to keep your " hands from picking and stealing, and your tongues from evil speaking, lying, and slandering ;" to enable you to love all men, and to do your " duty in that state of life in which it hath pleased God to call you.
Page 124 - ... undergo modification, with the view of placing all the King's subjects, whatever their religious creeds, upon a footing of perfect equality with respect to any civil privilege. " I appeal to the course which I pursued on those several questions when office must have been...
Page 125 - I have said enough, with respect to general principles and their practical application to public measures, to indicate the spirit in which the King's Government is prepared to act. Our object will be — the maintenance of peace — the scrupulous and honourable fulfilment, without reference to their original policy, of all existing engagements with Foreign Powers, — the support of public credit — the enforcement of strict economy — and the just and impartial consideration of what is due to...
Page 122 - I feel it incumbent on me to enter into a declaration of my views of public policy, as full and unreserved as I can make it, consistently with my duty as a Minister of the Crown. You are entitled to this, from the nature of the trust which I again solicit, from the long habits of friendly intercourse in which we have lived, and from your tried adherence to me in times of difficulty, when the demonstration of unabated confidence was of peculiar value. I gladly avail myself also of this, a legitimate...
Page 124 - Universities ; but I expressly declared that, if regulations, enforced by public authorities superintending the professions of law and medicine and the studies connected with them, had the effect of conferring advantages of the nature of civil privileges on one class of the King's subjects from which another class was excluded, those regulations ought to undergo modification, with the view of placing all the King's subjects, whatever their religious creeds, upon a footing of perfect equality with...
Page 123 - Bill implies merely a careful review of institutions, civil and ecclesiastical, undertaken in a friendly temper, combining, with the firm maintenance of established rights, the correction of proved abuses and the redress of real grievances—in that case, I can for myself and colleagues undertake to act in such a spirit and with such intentions.

Bibliographic information