Annual Report of the Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, Volume 2

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Vols. for 1889-1894, 1906-1912 issued with the Annual report of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; vols. for 1895-1905 issued with the Annual report of the Hatch Environment Station of the Massachnusetts Agricultural College.

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Page 70 - there is more joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, than over ninety and nine just persons that need no repentance.
Page 449 - Thou shalt not eat of it : cursed is the ground for thy sake ; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life ; thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee...
Page 392 - And then it started like a guilty thing Upon a fearful summons; I have heard, The cock that is the trumpet to the morn Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat Awake the god of day...
Page 139 - O'er mount and vale, where never summer ray Glanced, till the strong tornado broke his way Through the gray giants of the sylvan wild ; Yet many a sheltered glade, with blossoms gay. Beneath the showery sky and sunshine mild, Within the shaggy arms of that dark forest smiled XXX.
Page 32 - We set the last spring some twenty acres of Indian corn, and sowed some six acres of barley and pease ; and according to the manner of the Indians, we manured our ground with herrings, or rather shads, which we have in great abundance, and take with great ease at our doors.
Page 155 - ... for the men, and Indian meal for the oxen. Some beans, tea, and molasses, are added. Formerly hogsheads of rum were considered indispensable, and I have before me a bill of supplies for a logging concern of three teams in 1827-28, in which I find one hundred and eighty gallons of rum charged.
Page 146 - But Deborah Rebekah's nurse died, and she was buried beneath Beth-el under an oak: and the name of it was called Allon-bachuth.
Page 155 - ... that is, most hands are required when the distance is shortest, because the oxen, returning more frequently, require their loads to be prepared more expeditiously. Having built their camps, or while building them, the main roads are to be cut out. These run from the camps to the landing places, or some stream of sufficient size to float down the logs on the spring freshet. Other roads are cut to other clumps of timber. They are made by cutting and clearing away the underbrush, and such trees...
Page 160 - Very frequently he is obliged to make one contract to have the timber cut and hauled to the landing-places, and another to have it run down ; for the river drivers are a distinct class from the lumberers. Most of them, indeed, are lumberers ; yet it is but a small part of the lumberers that are river drivers. A great part of the lumberers are farmers, who must be on their farms at the season of driving, and therefore cannot undertake anything but the cutting and hauling.
Page 157 - ... trees that cover the low lands adjoining the river, and breaking up jams that form in narrow or shallow places. A jam is caused by obstacles in the river catching some of the sticks, which in their turn catch others coming down ; and so the mass increases until a solid dam is formed, which entirely stops up the river and prevents the further passage of any logs. These dams are most frequently formed at the top of some fall ¡and it is often a service that requires much skill and boldness, and...

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