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" ... him bade him be of good cheer, for that he would take the fault on himself. He kept his word accordingly. As soon as they were grown up to be men, the civil war broke out, in which our two friends took... "
A History, Military and Municipal, of the Ancient Borough of the Devizes ... - Page 289
by Henry Bull - 1859 - 602 pages
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The Spectator, Volume 4

1738
...Severity of ' the Mailer was too well known for the Criminal to ex' pedl any Pardon for fuch a Fault ; fo that the Boy, who ' was of a meek Temper, was terrified to Death at the ' Thoughts of his Appearance, when his Friend, who fat ' next to him, bade him be of good Cheer, for...
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The Spectator ...

1729
...of the Matter was too well known for the Criminal to axpec* any Pardon fof fbcfc a Faith ( fe tht the Boy, who •was of a meek Temper, was terrified to Death at -the Thoughts of his Appearance, when his Friend, who fat next to him, bad him be of good Cheer, for that...
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The Spectator, Volume 4

1778
...youth happened, by tome mif' chance, to tear the above-mentioned curtain : the feve4 rity of the mafter was too well known for the criminal ' to expect any pardon for fuch a fault ; fo that the boy, ' who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at ' the thoughts...
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The Addisonian miscellany, a selection from the Spectator, Tatler, and ...

Joseph Addison - 1801
...I'cyerity oi the mafter was too well known for the criminal to cxpect any pardon for fuch a fault s fo that the boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend, who fat nepct to him, bade him he of good cheer, for that...
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The British Essayists: The Spectator

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1802
...youth happened, by some mischance, to tear the above-mentioned curtain. The severity of the master* was too well known for the criminal to expect any...was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend who sat next to him bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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The Spectator ...

Joseph Addison - 1803
...youth happened, by some mischance, to tear the above-mentioned curtain. The severity of the master 2 was too well known for the criminal to expect any...was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance; when his friend who sat next to him bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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Select British Classics, Volume 14

English literature - 1803
...mischance, to tear the above-mentioned curtain : ' the severity of the master wg.s. too well known fop ' the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fault...of a meek temper, was ' terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, ' when his friend who sat next to him, bade him be ' of good cheer, for...
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Selections from the Spectator, Tatler, Guardian, and Freeholder: Selections ...

English essays - 1804
...to tear the abovementioned Curtain. The severity of the master was too well known for the crirniwal to expect any pardon for such a fault ; so that the...was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance; when his friend who sat next to him bade him b? of good cheer, for that...
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The Spectator; in Miniature: Being a Collection of the Principal ..., Volume 1

1808
...A youth happened hy some mischance to tear the ahove-mentioned curtain : the severity of the master was too well known for the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fanlt ; so that Ihe hoy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance,...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

Alexander Chalmers - 1810
...youth happened, by some mischance, to tear the above-mentioned curtain. The severity of the master* was too well known for the criminal to expect any...was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend who sat next to him bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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