The Poems of Ossian, Volume 2

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W. Strahan and T. Becket, 1773
 

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Page 207 - Fingal has received his fame. We passed away, like flames that had shone for a season. Our departure was in renown. Though the plains of our battles are dark and silent; our fame is in the four grey stones. The voice of Ossian has been heard. The harp has been strung in Selma. "Come, Ossian, come away," he says, "come, fly with thy fathers on clouds.
Page 403 - As autumn's dark storms pour from two echoing hills, so towards each other approached the heroes. As two dark streams from high rocks meet and mix, and roar on the plain: loud, rough, and dark in battle meet Lochlin and Inisfail. ... As the troubled noise of the ocean when roll the waves on high; as the last peal of the thunder of heaven; such is the noise of the battle.
Page 419 - Tom? whom the foul fiend hath led through fire and through flame, through ford and whirlpool, o'er bog and quagmire; that hath laid knives under his pillow, and halters in his pew...
Page 381 - I have seen the walls of Balclutha, but they were desolate. The fire had resounded in the halls : and the voice of the people is heard no more. The stream of Clutha was removed from its place by the fall of the walls. The thistle shook there its lonely head ; the moss whistled to the wind. The fox looked out from the windows, the rank grass of the wall waved round its head. Desolate is the dwelling of Moina, silence is in the house of her fathers.
Page 344 - O Ofcar ! bend the ftrong in arm, but fpare the feeble hand. Be thou a ftream of many tides againft the foes of thy people, but like the gale that moves the grafs to thofe who afk thy aid.
Page 286 - ... The genius of men is then much turned to admiration and astonishment. Meeting with many objects, to them new and strange, their imagination Is kept glowing, and their passions are often raised to the utmost. They think and express themselves boldly, and without restraint. In the progress of society, the genius and manners of men undergo a change more favourable to accuracy, than to strength or sublimity.
Page 354 - Moina is often seen, when the sunbeam darts on the rock, and all around is dark. There she is seen, Malvina, but not like the daughters of the hill. Her robes are from the stranger's land; and she is still alone.
Page 421 - For neither were ye playing on the fteep, Where your old Bards, the famous Druids, lie, Nor on the fhaggy top of Mona high, Nor yet where Deva fpreads her wifard ftream :55 Ay me!
Page 66 - Joy, like the rustling gale, comes on the soul of the king. He remembers the battles of old; the days, wherein his fathers fought. The days of old return on Fingal's mind, as he beholds the renown of his son. As the son rejoices, from his cloud, over the tree his beams have raised, as it shakes its lonely head on the heath ; so joyful is the king over Fillan...
Page 432 - I hear, at times, the ghosts of bards, and learn their pleasant song. But memory fails on my mind. I hear the call of years! They say, as they pass along, why does Ossian sing?

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