The History of the United States of America

Front Cover
Harper & brothers, 1871 - United States
 

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Contents

Blockade of Boston Massachusetts Army
69
New Hampshire Army
76
Battle of Bunker Hill Death of Warren
82
Indian Commissioners Postoffice Hospital
88
Georgia adopts the Association
95
British Depredations Naval Affairs
100
Camp before Boston Reenlistment of the Army
107
The British in Boston 3
113
Georgia Flight of Governor Wright
120
Hesitation of Pennsylvania and New Jersey
125
Commercial Regulations Agent sent to France
131
Ratified by New York Pennsylvania Convention
137
British Army arrives the Howes Commissioners 142
143
Battle of Long Island
149
Washington crosses the Hudson
155
State Governments of Maryland and Delaware
161
Cavalry Pickering Adjutaħt General
173
Commissioners to France
179
CHAPTER XXXVI
186
Foreign Officers Jealousy as to Rank
192
Indian Allies Proclamation Ticonderoga taken
196
Movements of the British Detachment under Baum
202
Stark the Militia in Burgoynes Rear
208
Capitulation of Burgoyne
214
Battle of Brandywine Affairs of Delaware
218
Resolution to hold the Posts on the Delaware
224
Defense of Red Bank
225
Distress of the Army
231
Detention of Burgoynes Army
237
Small Success of the British Loyalist Corps
243
Foraging Parties Washingtons Army
248
The British Commission Johnstones Overtures to Reed
254
Troubles from the Western Indians Clarkes Expedition
260
Articles of Confederation ay President of Congress
266
His Address and Paines Reply
268
Reorganization of the American Army
274
Kings Ferry on the Hudson occupied by the British
281
Danger of Charleston Neutrality proposed
284
Hostilities with the Six Nations New Jersey Troops
287
Plunder of St Eustatius
335
Supply of Provisions demanded at Mount Vernon Wash
341
Cornwallis retires toward Wilmington
347
CHAPTER XLIII
354
Nelson Governor Complaints against Jefferson Dictator
357
March to the Southward
363
Capitulation of Cornwallis
369
STATE CONSTITUTIONS THE CONFEDERATION WEST
374
Forms of Judicial Proceedings Law Reports
380
Descent of landed Property
387
Redemptioners
395
The Continental Congress
401
Heads of Departments Finance
404
Western SettlementsPennsylvania Law of Treason
410
Shelburne Prime Minister his Views 41
416
The Negotiation proceeds without the Knowledge of Ver
418
Inroads into KentuckyBattle at the Big Blue Lick
424
Letter of Marbois
429
Parties in Congress
430
Renewed Discontents among the Officers last Promotions
436
Carleton refuses to surrender the Negro Refugees
440
Paper Money Issues Continental and State
446
Resignation of Morris Livingston and Lincoln
453
Difficulties with Great Britain
455
Treaties with the Southwestern Indians and the Shawanese
461
Symptoms of Disruption
468
Troops raised by Congress
474
Protestant Episcopal Church
480
FORMATION OF THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION
482
Second Branch of the national Legislature Term of Service
488
Proposed Amendment to the Articles 403
489
The national Plan reported back to the House
494
Last Effort for a proportional second Branch
501
Delegates from New Hampshire take their Seats
503
Final Triumph of the small States
507
Regulation of Commerce Slave Trade
509
The three Compromises of the Constitution
519
CHAPTER XLVIII
527
Virginia plundered by Matthews
590

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Page 132 - ... it is necessary that the exercise of every kind of authority under the said crown should be totally suppressed, and all the powers of government exerted under the authority of the people of the colonies for the preservation of internal peace, virtue and good order, as well as for the defence of their lives, liberties and properties, against the hostile invasions and cruel depredations of their enemies...
Page 50 - I appeal to any white man if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not to eat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not.
Page 87 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birth-right, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of it; for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the honest industry of our forefathers and ourselves, against violence actually offered, we have taken up arms. We shall lay them down when hostilities shall cease on the part of the aggressors, and all danger of their being renewed shall be removed, and not before.
Page 440 - ... doubtful war. Called upon by your country to defend its invaded rights, you accepted the sacred charge, before it had formed alliances, and whilst it was without funds or a government to support you. You have conducted...
Page 391 - Every thing we can do is to improve it, if it happens in our day ; if not, let us transmit to our descendants, together with our slaves, a pity for their unhappy lot, and an abhorrence of slavery." Washington avowed to all his correspondents " that it was among his first wishes to see some plan adopted by which slavery may be abolished by law.
Page 512 - Religion and humanity had nothing to do with this question. Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. The true question at present is, whether the Southern States shall or shall not be parties to the Union.
Page 440 - Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of action, and bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.
Page 552 - THE PRESENT STATE OF NEW ENGLAND, With respect to the Indian War. Wherein is an Account of the true Reason thereof...
Page 270 - Assembly is so well disposed to second your endeavors in bringing those murderers of our cause, the monopolizers, forestallers, and engrossers, to condign punishment. It is much to be lamented that each state, long ere this, has not hunted them down as pests to society, and the greatest enemies we have to the happiness of America. I would to God that some one of the more atrocious in each state was hung in gibbets upon a gallows five times as high as the one prepared for Haman. No punishment, in...
Page 45 - This assembly is like no other that ever existed. Every man in it is a great man, an orator, a critic, a statesman; and therefore every man upon every question must show his oratory, his criticism, and his political abilities. The consequence of this is that business is drawn and spun out to an immeasurable length.

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